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Found 10 records similar to Potential Sediment Transport by Wind in the Prairie Provinces (PSTWPP)

Provincial

This map displays the risk of soil degradation by wind in the agricultural region of Alberta. Wind erosion is a concern because it reduces soil quality by removing soil nutrients, smaller soil particles and organic matter. Wind erosion can reduce air quality during extreme erosion events and also reduce water quality if eroded particles drift into streams and lakes. The map uses five classes to describe the wind erosion risk on bare, unprotected mineral soil: negligible, low, moderate, high and severe.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: WMS XML HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  ALBERTA, CLIMATOLOGYMETEOROLOGYATMOSPHERE, DESERTIFICATION, DOWNLOADABLE-DATA, GEOSCIENTIFICINFORMATION, SOIL-FERTILITY, SOIL-MOVEMENT, Government information
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the locations of glacial materials, circa mid-1950s. The extents of existing glaciers and ice caps are shown. The direction of ice movement is illustrated by denoting the trends of drumlins (elongated or oval hills of glacial drift), drumlinoid ridges, flutings, glacial striae, grooves and roche-moutonee (rounded glacially shaped rock) as well as the direction of valley glacier movements. Areas of extinct glacial lakes are shown with glacial spillways which are outlets of these extinct glacial lakes.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  geomorphology, glaciers, ice caps
Provincial

The drift thickness map of the Peerless Lake area (NTS 84B) shows the variation in thickness of unconsolidated sediment lying between the bedrock surface and the present-day land surface, and complements the Drift Thickness of Alberta map (Pawlowicz and Fenton, 1995). The thickness of the drift varies from locally less than 2 metres in Buffalo Head Hills to over 200 metres in the Loon River Lowland in the central part of the map area. Thick drift fills the major paleovalleys, which are the Muskwa Valley, the Red Earth Valley and Gods Valley. The drift is thinnest on the Peerless Lake Upland, the Utikuma Uplands and the Buffalo Head Hills Upland.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 1, 2005
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  84B, ALBERTA, BEDROCK-TOPOGRAPHY, BUFFALO-HEAD-HILLS, BURIED-VALLEYS, CANADA, DRIFT-THICKNESS, GEOSCIENTIFICINFORMATION, GIS-DATA
Provincial

The drift thickness map of the Pelican River area (NTS 83P) shows the variation in thickness of unconsolidated sediment lying between the bedrock surface and the present-day land surface, and complements the regional drift thickness map of Alberta (Pawlowicz and Fenton, 1995). The thickness of the drift varies from less than 20 metres in uplands, such as the Pelican Mountains, to a little over 260 metres in the Wiau Valley in the northeast part of the map area. The thickest drift fills the paleovalleys containing the major valleys: the Wiau Valley and the Leismer Valley in the northeast, and the north-trending Amesbury Valley in the central portion of the area.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2004
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  83P, ALBERTA, BEDROCK-TOPOGRAPHY, BURIED-VALLEYS, CANADA, DRIFT-THICKNESS, GEOSCIENTIFICINFORMATION, GIS-DATA, PELICAN-RIVER
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Source emission data include:

  • Compiled and assessed information from existing emissions inventories to enhance the quality of high resolution forecasts and simulations of air quality in the oil sands region;

  • Estimates of potential emissions to the air from tailings ponds analysed for reduced sulphur compounds (RSC), volatile organic compounds (VOC) and odour perceptibility.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 17, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  emissions, ambient air, air quality, oil sands, inventory, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds
Federal

Photographs of the seabed have been collected during marine expeditions of the Geological Survey of Canada Atlantic and Pacific for over 50 years. Typically, a sequence of 10 to 20 photos are taken at a single station as the vessel drifts with prevailing winds and currents and the camera is repeatedly lowered to and raised from the seafloor. The suite of photos from each station may best be considered a representative ensemble from the proximal area. Only in the more recent expeditions, where differential GPS and ultra-short baseline positioning is used in camera positioning, is the relative positional information given for each photo meaningful in interpreting the sequence as a transect.

Last Updated: Dec. 9, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 31, 2020
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB ESRI REST
Keywords:  marine sediment, seafloor photography, ocean bottom, Geology, Ocean floor, Photographs, Sediments
Provincial

This dataset results from mapping the surficial geology, and sand and gravel deposits with aggregate potential in the McLennan area (NTS 83N). This shapefile shows where materials and geology were observed at natural outcrops, sand and gravel pits, hand auger holes, and excavations dug by a backhoe. The type, thickness and order of the observed materials are described in the attribute table. Map 536 is a PDF version generated from the shapefiles.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 12, 2010
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  83N, AGGREGATE, ALBERTA, CANADA, GEOLOGY, GEOSCIENTIFICINFORMATION, GIS-DATA, MCLENNAN, SAND-AND-GRAVEL
Provincial

This GIS dataset depicts the drift thickness of NTS map area 84M ( line features). The data are created in ArcGIS and output for public distribution in shapefile formats.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 1, 2007
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  84M, ALBERTA, BEDROCK, BISTCHO-LAKE, BURIED-VALLEYS, CAMERON-HILLS, CANADA, DRIFT-THICKNESS, ELSA-HILL
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows glaciers, iceberg sources and iceberg drift patterns for Canada and Greenland; names major glaciers and icecaps.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 12, 1985
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  glaciers, hydrology
Provincial

This dataset is a shapefile depicting the suitability of geological setting in Alberta for waste management siting. It is derived from spatial analysis of other geological input, including: bedrock topography and morphology. occurrence of major buried drift aquifers, assumed on the basis of buried channel talwegs locations. surficial geology.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2005
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  72E, 72L, 72M, 73D, 73E, 73L, 73M, 74D, 74E
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