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Found 10 records similar to Brook trout - Kejimkujik

Federal

Stream temperature increases due to climate change, land clearing, beaver activity, etc... can be stressful for resident fishes and other aquatic species. Bruce Peninsula National Park monitors three creeks for thermal stress; particular emphasis is on Brook Trout habitat suitability.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Average daily temperature °C, Maximum temperature recorded daily °C, Minimum temperature recorded daily °C, Type of Data
Federal

This dataset covers electrofishing efforts in 11 streams or rivers in Forillon National Park since 2008. The abundance, size structure and condition of the fish in a brook trout population are sensitive to changes in the environment, specifically those caused by the presence of an invasive alien species, pollution or climate change, making this measure a good indicator of the health of the aquatic ecosystem. Fish, mainly brook trout, are harvested using electrofishing equipment in a closed 100-square-metre stretch of stream. Three fishing sessions, or passages, are carried out.

Last Updated: Nov. 8, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  electric fishing, streams, brook trout, lengh, weight
Federal

Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) are an important indicator of the health of aquatic ecosystems and are a valued resource for harvest by First Nations and for sport fishing by visitors. Parks Canada monitors lake trout using the Summer Profundal Index Netting (SPIN) method. Area weighted average catch per unit effort of lake trout is monitored for 3 key lakes (Kathleen, Mush and Bates) in Kluane National Park and Reserve using gillnets of varying mesh size. Nets are set for 2 hours at various depths and locations in the lakes.

Last Updated: Feb. 13, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, SPIN, Summer Profundal Index Netting
Federal

The hydrological regime of a stream plays a critical role in determining the biodiversity and ecological processes of aquatic, wetland and riparian ecosystems. As a result, hydrological characteristics provide important information on the integrity of freshwater systems and how they may be changing over time. The monitoring program assess and detect changes in a Streamflow Index of key hydrological measures in major transboundary watersheds at Kejimkujik. Stream water level is recorded hourly using in-situ water level data loggers.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Streams, hydrological regime, Nova Scotia
Federal

This measure monitors the trophic state (primary productivity) of six selected lakes, and four selected streams, in order to collect baseline data on processes fundamental to ecological structure and to detect any changes due to ecological stressors.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Lakes, Streams, Trophic State, Primary Productivity, Manitoba
Federal

Wetland surface area may be strongly influenced by changing climate regime, land use change, and/or alterations in local and regional hydrological regime. Monitoring surface area provides a coarse level assessment of ecosystem change in response to potential stressors in the region. Digitized aerial photographs provides a way to track the area of non-vegetated peatlands over time. The area of non-vegetated wetland surface is tracked every 10 years using aerial photographs.

Last Updated: Mar. 21, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Wetlands, Surface Extent, Hydrological regime, Aerial photo, Nova Scotia
Federal

The Common loon is a highly visible water bird inhabiting many of the lakes within Kejimkujik and the greater park ecosystem. It is a top predator in freshwater ecosystems in the area and is sensitive to a variety of stressors, including mercury bio-accumulation, acidification, water level fluctuation and human disturbance. The monitoring program tracks loon population status, by recording the number of adult pairs and number of chicks on focal lakes at Kejimkujik. Monitoring occurs twice annually in June and August using field observations from volunteers and park staff.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Common Loon, Stressors, Abundance and recruitment rate, Nova-Scotia
Federal

This dataset shows the locations of westslope cutthroat trout of non-stocked pure strain populations with average DNA purity ≥ 0.99%. This species is listed as threatened under the Species at Risk Act.

Last Updated: Apr. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Streams, Lakes, Westslope Cutthroat trout, species at risk, Banff National Park
Federal

Water temperature is considered a key ecosystem driver in freshwater ponds and streams of PEI National Park. American eel and Eastern Brook trout have been chosen for evaluating pond and stream temperature conditions as they are a common residents in most Atlantic Canada water bodies. Eastern brook trout are intolerant of warm water conditions. Stream temperature and brook trout growth are important factors that can directly influence survival, growth and distribution.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, freshwater, temperature, stream, optimum growth, growing degree days, brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, American eel
Federal

The Piping Plover in Nova Scotia is listed as ‘endangered’ by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Plovers are sensitive to stressors such as human disturbance and habitat loss. Piping plover breeding population censuses and productivity will be monitored at all coastal beaches in Kejimkujik every year. This work occurs during the plover breeding season (May- August) with 3-5 visits per week at both St.Catherines and Little Port Joli Beaches.

Last Updated: Mar. 21, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Coastal, Piping plover, dunes, Nova Scotia
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