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Found 10 records similar to Pollutant Transformation, Summer 2013 Aircraft Intensive Multi Parameters, Oil Sands Region

Federal

From August 10 to September 10, 2013, ground-based monitoring was significantly augmented at the Fort McKay South site (AMS13) to measure additional air pollutants and meteorological properties beyond what was available from the established long-term air quality monitoring in the area. This air monitoring study, undertaken in parallel with measurements from an aircraft flying over and downwind of the oil sands, was designed to gain a clearer picture of the mixture of air pollutants produced from different oil sands related activities and how they react and are transported in the atmosphere. These data are used to improve the capability of air quality models to determine current and future air pollutant levels and amounts of atmospheric deposition of pollutants over and downwind of the oil sands region. Periods of elevated pollutant concentrations were observed; however, none of these surpassed the current short duration (hourly, 8 hour or 24 hour) federal and provincial standards.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 13, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ambient air, ozone, total gaseous mercury, sulphur dioxide, particle composition, particulate matter (PM), PM composition, polycyclic aromatic compounds, oil sands
Federal

Concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Tailings Pond Water in the Oil Sands Region – September 2013

To evaluate evaporation from tailings ponds as a potential source of emissions of pollutants to air, bulk water samples were collected from 8 locations in two ponds at a single facility in the oil sands region over two days in September 2013. Chemical measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were made. PAH data are reported for the sixteen species identified as priority pollutants by the US EPA. TPH refers to the total amount of hydrocarbon compounds.

Last Updated: Jul. 19, 2019
Date Published: Nov. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, oil sands, emissions, point source, area source, atmospheric concentrations, deposition, tailings pond, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada has been monitoring ambient air in the oil sands region for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) using passive air samplers since November 2010. Ambient air samples collected using the established protocols of the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network are termed passive PAC samples. Passive samplers are deployed for two-month periods across a network of 17 sites that are maintained by the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association. Average PAC levels across the passive sampling sites in the oil sands region are comparable to urban/sub-urban levels across Canada and are elevated compared with background rural sites in Canada.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2019
Date Published: Feb. 17, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Deposition, polycyclic aromatic compounds, passive sampling, oil sands, modelling, inferential estimation, nitro-PAHs, oxy-PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Ambient air quality data include:

  • Filter Pack (24-hour integrated concentrations of particle-bound SO2-4, NO-3, Cl-, NH+4, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ and gaseous SO2 and HNO3 collected daily by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network)

  • Total Gaseous Mercury (hourly mixing ratios measured by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network and Prairie and Northern Region)

  • Atmospheric speciated mercury (Hg) (2-hour average concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and Hg on PM2.5 (total particulate Hg - TPM)

  • Comprehensive set of measurements collected from an aircraft (various time resolutions) covering an area of 140,000 km2 over the oil sands region

  • Comprehensive set of measurements collected from the Fort McKay Oski-ôtin monitoring site

  • Ozone (hourly mixing ratios measured by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network)

  • Ozone Vertical Profiles (ozone mixing ratios as a function of height) measured by the Canadian Ozone Sonde Network

  • Aerosol Optical Depth (measure of the degree to which the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere prevents the transmission of light, from the ground to the top of the atmosphere) measured as part of the AErosol RObotic CANadian (AEROCAN) network

  • Satellite overpass data have a relatively high spatial resolution over the Oil Sands region to produce images and geo-referenced data of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) “vertical column density” (which correlates with surface concentration)

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: May 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Air - Quality, Provide Air Quality/UV Information Products and Services, Monitor Air Quality and UV Parameters and Manage Data, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Air quality, Oil sands
Federal

Environment Canada has been monitoring ambient air in the oil sands region for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) since December 2010. Ambient air samples collected using the established protocols and schedule of the National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) program are termed active PAC samples. Active sampling is done at three sites (Mannix [AMS5], Lower Camp [AMS11] and Fort McKay South [AMS13], Alberta). Ambient air concentrations in the oil sands region can be used to evaluate regional differences in PAC concentrations and can be compared with levels of PACs measured in other parts of Canada and to ambient air quality objectives.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2019
Date Published: Nov. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Deposition, polycyclic aromatic compounds, active sampling, oil sands, modelling, alkylated PAHs, PACs, benzo(a)pyrene, air quality
Federal

Long Term Air Pollutant and Meteorological Monitoring at Fort McKay’s Oski-ôtin site: Validated data

Continuous monitoring of multiple air pollutants along with meteorological conditions began in Fort McKay at the Oski-ôtin site in August 2013. The purpose of Oski-ôtin’s enhanced monitoring is to gain a clearer picture of the mixture, transport and fate of air pollutants produced from the different oil sands related activities. Compared to the pre-existing monitoring conducted by Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) in Fort McKay and throughout the region, the Oski-ôtin site provides measurements for a larger number of pollutants using research grade instruments (configured to be more precise at lower concentrations). Instruments located at this site also monitor pollutants, winds and temperatures at multiple heights above the ground.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, ozone, acidifying gases, sulphur dioxide, particulate matter mass, PM composition, CAPMoN, filter pack, polycyclic aromatic compounds
Federal

Measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) using sunphotometers are being made in the oil sands region (at Fort McKay’s Oski-ôtin site, and Fort McMurray). AOD is a measure of the degree to which atmospheric aerosols absorb or scatter sunlight anywhere from the top of the atmosphere to the ground. These tiny solid or liquid particles can have natural or anthropogenic sources including dust, sea salt, smoke, or pollutants. Measurements of AOD made in the oil sands region can be compared with data collected at other Canadian locations from the AErosol RObotic CANadian (AEROCAN) network, such as Kelowna, BC; Lethbridge, AB; Bratt’s Lake and Waskesiu, SK; and Yellowknife, NT.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ambient air, oil sands, aerosols, satellite, remote sensing, modelling, Ground-based Aerosol Optical Depth, Oil sands, Air quality
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Source emission data include:

  • Compiled and assessed information from existing emissions inventories to enhance the quality of high resolution forecasts and simulations of air quality in the oil sands region;

  • Estimates of potential emissions to the air from tailings ponds analysed for reduced sulphur compounds (RSC), volatile organic compounds (VOC) and odour perceptibility.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 17, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  emissions, ambient air, air quality, oil sands, inventory, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds
Federal

In the oil sands air monitoring component, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) levels are monitored by ground-based instruments, satellites and other measurements. Monitoring of air pollutants from satellites is becoming an alternative to surface and aircraft measurements, and allows for better understanding of the global distribution, sources and trends of pollutants. Using satellite data for the oil sands region, high-resolution air pollutant maps show distinct concentrations of NO2 (Figure 1a) and SO2 (Figure 1b) over an area (roughly 30 km x 50 km, or 19 miles x 31 miles) of intensive oil sands surface mining. The map shows that NO2 concentrations are significant and are comparable to measurements made over large, individual sources such as coal-burning power plants.

Last Updated: Jul. 19, 2019
Date Published: May 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, acidifying gases, sulphur dioxide, active sampling, oil sands, aircraft, satellite, nitrogen dioxide, power plants
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Deposition data include:

  • Passive Sampling of PACs deployed for two month periods across a network of 17 sites

  • Active sampling of PACs at three sites to inform the amount of dry deposition

  • Particulate metals (24 hour integrated samples following the one in six day National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) cycle)

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Air - Quality, Provide Air Quality/UV Information Products and Services, Monitor Air Quality and UV Parameters and Manage Data, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Air quality
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