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Found 10 records similar to Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document – Sodium

Federal

Boron is an essential element for plant growth and is applied directly to the soil as a plant fertilizer. Sodium borate and boric acid are used as fungistatic agents on vegetables, fruits and trees. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for boron in drinking water is 5 mg/L (5000 µg/L).

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Boron, water containing Boron, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

An aesthetic objective of ≤250 mg/L has been established for chloride in drinking water. At concentrations above the aesthetic objective, chloride imparts undesirable tastes to water and to beverages prepared from water and may cause corrosion in the distribution system.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 4, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, chloride in drinking-water
Federal

The aesthetic objective for iron in drinking water is ≤0.3 mg/L (≤300 µg/L).

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, iron in drinking water
Federal

An aesthetic objective of ≤ 15 true colour units (TCU) has been established for colour in drinking water.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 19, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, colour in drinking-water
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentrations (MAC) and aesthetic objectives (AO) for 1,2- and 1,4-dichlorobenzene in drinking water are established.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 20, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, dichlorobenzene in drinking-water
Federal

There is no evidence of adverse health effects specifically attributable to calcium in drinking water. Insufficient data are available to set a specific value for an aesthetic objective for calcium in drinking water. A guideline for calcium has therefore not been specified.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Nov. 28, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, calcium in drinking-water
Federal

The aesthetic objective for sulphate in drinking water is ≤500 mg/L, based on taste considerations. Because of the possibility of adverse physiological effects at higher concentrations, it is also recommended that health authorities be notified of sources of drinking water that contain sulphate concentrations in excess of 500 mg/L.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, sulphate in drinking-water
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for monochlorobenzene in drinking water is 0.08 mg/L (80 µg/L); the aesthetic objective (AO) is ≤ 0.03 mg/L ( ≤ 30 µg/L).

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 29, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, monochlorobenzene in drinking-water
Federal

An aesthetic objective of ≤250 mg/L has been established for chloride in drinking water. At concentrations above the aesthetic objective, chloride imparts undesirable tastes to water and to beverages prepared from water and may cause corrosion in the distribution system.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 4, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chloride, chloride in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Health Canada recently completed its review of MTBE in drinking water. Based on this review, it was concluded that the odour of MTBE would make drinking water unacceptable to Canadians at concentrations much lower than those that may pose a health risk. An aesthetic objective of 0.015 mg/L is established for MTBE in drinking water.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether, MTBE, MTBE in drinking-water
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