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Found 10 records similar to LESSS Areal Extent - Point Pelee

Federal

The endangered eastern prickly pear cactus is a focal species for Lake Erie Sand Spit Savannas (LESSS), one of the most imperiled terrestrial ecosystems in North America. Although monitoring of the of eastern prickly pear cactus has occurred within the park since 1971, accurate estimation of population trends is not possible due to variability in sampling techniques. Presently Point Pelee National Park uses a 10x10m grid to sample selected plots of different densities.

Last Updated: Apr. 16, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Eastern Prickly Pear Cactus, Opuntia humifusa, Endangered Species, Sample Grids, Lake Erie Sand Spit, Essex County, Ontario
Federal

Point Pelee National Park is the home to an isolated population of five-lined skink - the only lizard species found in eastern Canada. Monitoring involves overturning of logs and boards, and subsequent search for skinks. Dimensions of the cover object and its decay class are also recorded.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Five-lined Skink, Plestiodon fasciatus, Eumeces fasciatus, Endangered Species, cover objects, Essex County, Ontario
Federal

Monitoring consists of four trap lines consisting of five traps each baited for five sessions (of five days each) every two years.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Southern Flying Squirrel, Special Concern Species, Trap Lines, Essex County, Ontario
Provincial

The data represents the density of wetland habitat in the agricultural region of Alberta in 2002. Wetlands are depressional areas that are wet for a long enough period that the plant and animals living in them are adapted to, and often dependent on, living in wet conditions for at least part of their life cycle. In drier areas of the province, wetlands tend to be more intermittent, while in wetter areas, wetlands tend to be more persistent. Topography also affects the occurrence of wetlands.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: WMS XML HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  BIOTA, BOGS, CONSERVATION-AGRICULTURE, DOWNLOADABLE-DATA, ENVIRONMENT, INLANDWATERS, MARSHES, SWAMPS, Government information
Federal

Changes in the cover of emergent vegetation (cattails and Phragmites predominantly) and open water are quantified through the classification of remote sensing data taken in spring. Cattails are the dominant feature of Pelee marsh, and their spread has altered the habitat mosaic of the wetland. Over the past decade, Phragmites has spread in the park, colonizing Typha-dominated areas and further threatening marsh biodiversity, wildlife habitats, and functions

Last Updated: Apr. 16, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Habitat Succession, Habitat Interspersion, spatial extent, Remote Sensing, Aerial Photos, Essex County, Ontario
Federal

Calling frogs and toads are surveyed annually at permanent stations, three times during the spring and early summer, at least 15 days apart. Each survey is 3 minutes long. These surveys are conducted by park staff and volunteers.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Frogs, toads, call surveys, Essex County, Ontario
Federal

Many processes and functions in wetlands are driven by water quality, this measure can therefore determine the composition and health of wetland species. Point Pelee National Park collects several parameters to monitor water quality in the park wetlands such as turbidity, total suspended solids, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and specific conductivity.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Marsh Water Quality, turbidity, suspended solids, phosphorus, nitrogen, conductivity, Essex County, Ontario
Federal

Elk Island National Park monitors spatial changes to open water features throughout the park. This measure relies on an unsupervised classification of remotely-sensed multispectral satellite imagery (Landsat). Analysis is performed roughly every five years, using images from mid-July.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Open water, hydrography, remote sensing, multispectral satellite imagery, landsat, Alberta
Federal

Elk Island National Park uses land cover classification to determine spatial changes of grassland vegetation throughout the park. This measure relies on a supervised classification of remotely-sensed multispectral satellite imagery (Landsat). Analysis is performed roughly every five years, using images from mid-July.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Grassland, remote sensing, multispectral satellite imagery, landsat, vegetation, Alberta
Federal

Elk Island National Park uses land cover classification to determine spatial changes of forest vegetation throughout the park. This measure relies on a supervised classification of remotely-sensed multispectral satellite imagery (Landsat). Analysis is performed roughly every five years, using images from mid-July.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest, remote sensing, multispectral satellite imagery, landsat, vegetation, Alberta
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