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Found 10 records similar to Daily Discharge: Turkey Lakes Watershed Study

Federal

Water chemistry is measured at several stream stations in the Turkey Lakes Watershed (TLW) to quantify mass fluxes, cycling and budgets. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) tends to focus on lake outflow stations and other stations situated on Norberg Creek (the major drainage channel in the basin) while Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) tends to focus on headwater streams draining forested hill slopes. Monitoring began in 1980 but not all stations have complete records through to the present. Stream flow is measured continuously while water chemistry is measured intermittently.

Last Updated: Aug. 28, 2019
Date Published: Apr. 18, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Turkey Lakes Watershed Study, streams, major ions, nutrients, metals, acid rain, emissions, long term monitoring, watershed
Federal

The snowpack has been sampled during both the accumulation and ablation stages at as many as 13 sites within the Turkey Lakes Watershed, Algoma, central Ontario, Canada since 1980, although more quantitative surveys began in 1989. Snow depth and a physical description of snowpack have been recorded at each station. Snow density, water equivalent and chemistry (major ions, pH and nutrients) have been determined. Since 2012, chemistry has only been completed on up to three sites although snow density and water equivalent have been measured at the others.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 18, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Turkey Lakes Watershed Study, snow, snowcores, major ions, nutrients, metals, acid rain, emissions, long term monitoring
Federal

Groundwater wells were installed in the Turkey Lakes Watershed basin in the early 1980’s. These test wells were installed in eight sub-basins of the watershed and range in depth from 0.5 to 9.7 metres. They are located on a variety of terrain throughout. The water chemistry has been sampled at each of these wells starting in the 1980 to 1990’s, but only a small selection are still presently being sampled.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 18, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  acid rain, watershed basin, hydrology, groundwater, major ions, nutrients, metals, temperature, dissolved oxygen
Federal

The Turkey Lakes Watershed (TLW) Study was initiated in 1980 by Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada to evaluate anthropogenic perturbation of Canadian Shield ecosystems. Originally, the Study focused on the aquatic and terrestrial effects of acid rain, but now it includes research into the effects of other anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. toxic contaminants) and ecological perturbations (e.g. forest harvesting, climate change and fish habitat modification).

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 1, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Turkey Lakes Watershed Study, TLW, Lakes, streams, major ions, nutrients, metals, temperature, dissolved oxygen
Federal

The Turkey Lakes Watershed (TLW) is 1 of 5 hydrologically "calibrated" basins in eastern Canada that were originally devoted to process-oriented research into "acid rain" effects. They were selected to cover a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions, deposition magnitudes, and terrain characteristics. Batchawana Lake is the headwater (highest elevation) lake in the TLW. It has two distinct basins, north and south (L1 and L2).

Last Updated: Aug. 30, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 30, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV HTML
Keywords:  acid rain, watershed basin, hydrology, lakes, major ions, nutrients, metals, temperature, dissolved oxygen
Federal

The Turkey Lakes Watershed Study (TLWS) was established in 1979 and is one of the longest running ecosystem studies in Canada. It is 10.5 km2 and is located approximately 60 km north of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario at the northern margin of the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence forest region. Researchers from Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada established the research watershed to evaluate the impacts of acid rain on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 27, 2020
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: WMS ESRI REST
Keywords:  Turkey Lakes Watershed, Natural resources, Scientific information, Soil, Resources management, Inland waters, Hydrology, Scientific research, Streams
Federal

The bioaccumulation of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and personal care product chemicals (PPCPs) was studied in Cootes Paradise Marsh (CPM), an urban wetland that receives tertiary treated municipal waste waters as well as urban storm runoff. PPCPs were measured in caged and wild goldfish, as well as wild carp, and compared to observed bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) using concentrations in surface waters and fish blood plasma, with modeled BAFs. Thirty-two PPCPs were detected in water from the central CPM site (CPM3) while 64 PPCPs were found at higher concentrations at a site immediately downstream of the effluent outflow (CPM1). Following a 3-week deployment, 15 PPCPs were detected in the plasma of caged goldfish at CPM1, and 14 at CPM3, compared to only 3 in goldfish caged at a reference site.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2019
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Bioaccumulation, Fish, Pharmaceutical chemicals, Personal care product chemicals, Bioaccumulation factors, Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP), Area of Concern (AOC), Biochemicals, Environment
Federal

The epiphytic cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia pisum forms spherical colonies embedded in a gelatinous matrix that is attached to submerged aquatic vegetation. In surveys of two fluvial lakes of the St. Lawrence River conducted in 2006–2007, growth conditions and diazotrophic ability in conjunction with the biomass and condition of its supporting macrophyte, Vallisneria americana, were examined. G. pisum integrates complex, temporally variable water-quality characteristics that are dependent upon hydrology and water residence time, thus acting as an early warning indicator of incipient habitat degradation that may lead to cyanobacterial proliferation and low biomass of vascular macrophytes. Supplemental Information

The St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP) 2011 to 2026 (see http://planstlaurent.qc.ca/en/home.html) is the latest Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence and builds on the four previous agreements implemented since 1988.

Last Updated: Aug. 28, 2019
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  St. Lawrence River, Lake Saint-Pierre, Lake Saint-Louis, epiphytic cyanobacteria, Gloeotichia pisum, Vallisneria americana, nitrogen depletion, indicator, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP)
Federal

Freshwater mussels contribute important ecological functions to aquatic systems. The water filtered by mussel assemblages can improve water quality, and the mixing of sediments by burrowing mussels can improve oxygen content and release nutrients. However, nearly 70 percent of North American freshwater mussel species are listed as either endangered, threatened, or in decline. In Ontario, 28 species are in decline or in need of protection.

Last Updated: Aug. 28, 2019
Date Published: Aug. 8, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  freshwater mussels, glochidea, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Villosa iris, species at risk, pesticides, neonicotinoids, contaminants, viability
Federal

In this study, seven non‐specific biomarkers were compared in Spottail Shiners (Notropis hudsonius Clinton) from localities receiving urban and industrial effluents and relatively clean localities in the St Lawrence River, Canada. Pigmented macrophages are involved in a variety of functions including the detoxification and recycling of exogenous and endogenous material, responses to foreign material or infectious agents, and antigen recognition. Pigmented macrophage aggregates are focal accumulations of pigmented macrophages found in the spleen, kidney, liver and other organs of fishes. They may respond to toxicants or exposure to infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria either by increasing in number and size or by changing the shape of the aggregation.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2019
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), pigmented macrophages, St. Lawrence River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
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