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Found 10 records similar to Indigenous Justice Strategy

Federal

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS), now known as the Indigenous Justice Program, supports community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Created to provide alternatives to the mainstream system, the Indigenous Justice program provides funding to communities through two categories: The Community-Based Justice fund and the Capacity-Building Fund. Community-Based Justice currently funds 197 community-based programs that serve over 750 communities.he objectives of the Community-Based Justice Fund component are:

to allow Indigenous people the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities;
to help reduce the rates of crime and incarceration among Indigenous people in communities with cost-shared programs; and,
to foster improved responsiveness, fairness, inclusiveness, and effectiveness of the justice system with respect to justice and its administration so as to meet the needs and aspirations of Indigenous people. The Capacity-Building Fund is designed to support capacity-building efforts in Indigenous communities, particularly as they relate to building increased knowledge and skills for the establishment and management of community-based justice programs.

Last Updated: Feb. 24, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2015
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Indigenous Justice Systems, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Reconciliation, Community engagement, Restorative Justice
Federal

The virtual panel explored how Indigenous justice, RJ or customary law approaches are used in two First Nations and one Inuit context. The panel helped to highlight that while RJ principles may have strong parallels to Indigenous legal principles and traditions, they are not the same thing. Several panellists highlighted the fundamental importance of community relationships in Indigenous justice approaches and the goal of meeting the needs of the collective rather than focusing primarily on the reparation of harm for an individual. Canada’s adoption of the UN Declaration and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report provide support to Indigenous nations and groups that are asserting their rights to maintain and reclaim their own justice systems and legal traditions as an expression of the larger right of self-determination.

Last Updated: Sep. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 1, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  access to justice; dispute prevention and resolution; Indigenous justice; restorative justice
Federal

Young people identified overrepresentation of the Indigenous population in Canada’s Criminal Justice System (CJS) as unfair, and largely a result of societal discrimination as well as systemic discrimination in the justice system. They also felt that it was symptomatic of the poverty and intergenerational trauma affecting Indigenous communities.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Young offenders, Aboriginal affairs, Aboriginal peoples, Aboriginal youth, Criminal justice, Legal issues, Research
Federal

Indigenous people are overrepresented in Canada's criminal justice system as both victims and offenders. National data on Indigenous people in the criminal justice system includes data on self-reported victimization , police-reported homicide, and provincial/territorial and federal custody. In 2014/2015, Indigenous adults accounted for 26% of provincial/territorial custody admissions and 25% of the in-custody federal offender population. The proportion of Indigenous adults in custody was about 9 times higher than their representation in the adult population (3%).

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 2, 2017
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Criminality, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation
Federal

Indigenous people are overrepresented in Canada's criminal justice system as both victims and as people accused or convicted of crime. There are only a few national data sources that provide criminal justice statistics disaggregated by Indigenous identity. National data that does exist to identify Indigenous people in the criminal justice system include the General Social Survey (GSS) on self-reported victimization, police-reported homicide statistics, and data on provincial/territorial and federal custody. This fact sheet uses data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: May 1, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice System, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation, Victims, Criminal Justice, Statistics, Women, Youth
Federal

This report summarizes the input received from partners who participated in the Department of Justice Canada’s initial engagement inviting First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners to discuss the modernization of the Privacy Act. These initial discussions took place from spring 2020 to spring 2021. This report also outlines next steps for further engagement with First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners on Privacy Act modernization. The purpose of sharing this report at this time is to let partners know what we have learned so far through this engagement process, to provide a common basis for continuing the conversation.

Last Updated: Mar. 31, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 2, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Privacy Act, Engagement, Modernization
Federal

Purpose and scope of annual reporting

Section 7 of the Act requires the Minister of Justice to, in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples, report annually on progress in relation to “the measures taken under section 5 and the preparation and implementation of the action plan referred to in section 6”. These annual reports provide transparency and ensure accountability for the work to implement the Act as it progresses. This first report outlines progress made between June 2021 and March 2022 towards ensuring the consistency of laws and development of the action plan in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous peoples. This period included the creation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act Implementation Secretariat at the Department of Justice Canada, a new multi-disciplinary team, 60% of whom self-identify as First Nations, Inuit or Métis, which is now leading the federal implementation of the Act.

Last Updated: Jul. 12, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 21, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Annual Report, Human rights
Federal

This literature review addresses the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the Canadian criminal justice system. It examines the extent of overrepresentation, its underlying causes, and some initiatives taken to address the issue. The report also identifies gaps in the efforts to address overrepresentation and suggests potential ways to mitigate the problem. Understanding overrepresentation along these lines should provide policy makers and program managers with useful information to assist in their work.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Criminal Justice, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation, Colonialism, Systemic Discrimination, Socio-economic Marginalization
Federal

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of this Act to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Department of Justice supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in the Justice Sustainable Development Strategy (JSDS). The Department recognises that sustainable development – social and economic sustainability, as well as environmental sustainability – contributes to the Department’s ability to achieve its strategic outcomes. To this end, Justice Canada’s vision for sustainable development is the integration of sustainable development – in its broadest terms – with departmental objectives, needs and practices.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 2, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Sustainable Development, Strategy, SDG, Federal Sustainable Development Act, United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
Federal

The Indigenous Advisory Committee provides the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (the Agency) with expert advice for the development of key policy and guidance on the new impact assessment system. Nominations for the Committee were sought from August 21 to October 7, 2018. Members were selected in April 2019. The Committee's membership is made up of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals.

Last Updated: May 28, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 30, 2020
Organization: Impact Assessment Agency of Canada
Formats: PDF
Keywords:  impact assessment, IAAC, Indigenous Advisory Committee
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