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Found 10 records similar to Reduce your exposure to lead

Federal

Lead is a naturally occurring metal found in rock and soil and also has many industrial applications. Due to both its natural occurrence and long history of global use, lead is ubiquitous in the environment and is present in air, water and soil as well as in food, drinking water and household dust. Levels of lead in most environmental media have declined significantly over the past few decades due to the discontinued use of lead in paint, gasoline and the solder used in food cans.

Last Updated: Dec. 29, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 3, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  lead, metal
Federal

Lead chromate is a lead-based chemical that has been used illegally to add or enhance colour to brightly coloured yellow spices such as turmeric. Lead occurs naturally in the environment and consumers are exposed to low levels of lead in food, drinking water, air, dust and soil. It is neurotoxic, can cause anaemia, hypertension, immunotoxicity and can be toxic to kidneys and reproductive organs. This survey was created to monitor lead chromate adulteration in spices available on the Canadian retail market.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 20, 2022
Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Food safety, chemistry, chemical residues, lead chromate, spices
Federal

Learn about the health effects of lead and how to reduce your exposure if it is present in your drinking water.

Last Updated: Oct. 7, 2020
Date Published: Aug. 6, 2019
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Water Talk, drinking water, Lead
Federal

Lead is usually found in drinking water as a result of leaching from distribution and plumbing system components, particularly in aggressive (corrosive) waters. Historically, lead has been used extensively in service lines, solders and fittings, making its presence in drinking water more likely in older homes and neighbourhoods. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with lead in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, lead, lead in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. These indicators present the concentrations of 4 substances (mercury, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A) in Canadians for the periods 2007 to 2009, 2009 to 2011, 2012 to 2013, and 2014 to 2015. Chemical substances are everywhere, including in the air, soil, water, products and food, and can enter the body through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. Through biomonitoring, the government can identify priorities, develop or revise risk management strategies, and track progress on policies put in place to reduce or control these substances.

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, air and climate, human health impacts, pollution, levels of exposure, harmful substances, concern, chemicals, human biomonitoring
Provincial

Leading Group for the Cariboo Region (pinegroup or firgroup). #### 1. IDF - Fir Group: includes all forest polygons in NDT 4 (IDF and BG biogeoclimatic zones) that meet any of the following criteria: *a) Douglas-fir ( Fd or Fdi) leading or ponderosa pine leading; *b) Lodgepole pine leading, and Douglas-fir ( Fd or Fdi) or ponderosa pine greater than 15% in any inventory layer; *c) Trembling aspen leading, and Douglas-fir ( Fd or Fdi) or Ponderosa pine greater than 15% in any inventory layer, and spruce, red-cedar, cottonwood and birch less than 6% in any inventory layer; *d) No species information in inventory data (usually NSR stands), and inventory type group for pre-harvest stand or the current stand = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 29, or 32 These inventory type groups correspond to the following species compositions F, FC, FCy, FH, FS, FPl, Fpy, FL, FDEcid, PlF and Py. If inventory type group=0 and pre-harvest inventory type is not available, classify the polygon as Pine Group.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 12, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  BC, Canada, Cariboo, SRMP, Williams Lake, leading group, pine group, Government information
Federal

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with lead in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability and limitations of appropriate treatment and analytical technologies. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for total lead in drinking water is 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L).

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 13, 2019
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, lead in drinking water
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. These indicators present the concentrations of 4 substances (mercury, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A) in Canadians for the periods 2007 to 2009, 2009 to 2011, 2012 to 2013, and 2014 to 2015. Chemical substances are everywhere, including in the air, soil, water, products and food, and can enter the body through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. Through biomonitoring, the government can identify priorities, develop or revise risk management strategies, and track progress on policies put in place to reduce or control these substances.

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, air and climate, human health impacts, pollution, levels of exposure, harmful substances, concern, chemicals, human biomonitoring
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. These indicators present the concentrations of 4 substances (mercury, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A) in Canadians for the periods 2007 to 2009, 2009 to 2011, 2012 to 2013, and 2014 to 2015. Chemical substances are everywhere, including in the air, soil, water, products and food, and can enter the body through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. Through biomonitoring, the government can identify priorities, develop or revise risk management strategies, and track progress on policies put in place to reduce or control these substances.

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, air and climate, human health impacts, pollution, levels of exposure, harmful substances, concern, chemicals, human biomonitoring
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. These indicators present the concentrations of 4 substances (mercury, lead, cadmium and bisphenol A) in Canadians for the periods 2007 to 2009, 2009 to 2011, 2012 to 2013, and 2014 to 2015. Chemical substances are everywhere, including in the air, soil, water, products and food, and can enter the body through ingestion, inhalation and skin contact. Through biomonitoring, the government can identify priorities, develop or revise risk management strategies, and track progress on policies put in place to reduce or control these substances.

Last Updated: Jan. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, air and climate, human health impacts, pollution, levels of exposure, harmful substances, concern, chemicals, human biomonitoring
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