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Found 10 records similar to Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document – Haloacetic Acids

Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) in drinking water is 0.4 mg/L (400 µg/L).

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 21, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, nitrilotriacetic acid, NTA, NTA in drinking-water
Federal

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with PFOA in drinking water. It incorporates available studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the drinking water guideline for PFOA is a maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.0002 mg/L (0.2 µg/L), based on the general population.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 7, 2018
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, Perfluorooctanoic Acid, PFOA, PFOA in drinking-water
Federal

This guideline technical document was prepared in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water and is based on assessments of 2,4-D completed by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) and supporting documents.

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 4, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid
Federal

This guideline technical document was prepared in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water and is based on assessments of MCPA completed by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency and supporting documents.

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 18, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, Chloro, methylphenoxyacetic Acid, MCPA in drinking-water
Federal

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with tetrachloroethylene in drinking water, incorporating all relevant routes of exposure from drinking water—namely, ingestion as well as inhalation and skin absorption from showering and bathing. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with tetrachloroethylene in drinking water, incorporating all relevant routes of exposure from drinking water—namely, ingestion as well as inhalation and skin absorption from showering and bathing.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, tetrachloroethylene in drinking-water
Federal

This Guideline Technical Document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with benzene in drinking water, incorporating multiple routes of exposure to benzene from drinking water, including ingestion and both inhalation and skin absorption from showering and bathing. From this review, the guideline for benzene in drinking water is established at a maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L).

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, benzene in drinking-water
Federal

This guideline technical document provides the scientific information used to update the guideline for bromate in drinking water. It reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with bromate in drinking water, taking into consideration new studies and approaches as well as the availability of appropriate treatment technology.

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 13, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, bromate in drinking-water
Federal

This Guideline Technical Document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with turbidity in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches, and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. From this review, several guidelines for turbidity in drinking water are established, depending on the source water type and treatment processes used for filtration.

Last Updated: Sep. 28, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 17, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, turbidity in drinking-water
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chlorite in drinking water is 1 mg/L. The MAC for chlorate in drinking water is 1 mg/L. A guideline for chlorine dioxide is not required because of its rapid reduction to chlorite in drinking water.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, Chlorite-and-Chlorate in drinking-water, chlorine dioxide
Federal

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with barium in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. Based on this review, the guideline for barium in drinking water is a maximum acceptable concentration of 2 mg/L.

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 13, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  water, water quality, drinking water quality, potable water, contaminants, exposure to contaminants, barium in drinking-water
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