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Found 10 records similar to Mineral Assessment of the Ddhaw Ghro Habitat Protection Area, Yukon

Provincial

The proposed Kusawa Special Management Area (SMA) consists of 3118.6 km2 in southwest Yukon. A map notation in 1972 denoting Kusawa Lake and the surrounding area as a possible park planning area is included in the proposed Kusawa Special Management Area (SMA). This has discouraged mineral exploration programs in the area since then. The area was selected as a SMA by the Carcross Tagish First Nation, with Kwanlin Dun and Champagne and Aishihik First Nations being co-signers, with the intention of making the proposed Kusawa SMA a Natural Environment Park.

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey, Yukon Data, Government information
Provincial

The proposed Snafu/Tarfu Special Management Area (SMA) consists of 733 km2 in southern Yukon. The Snafu and Tarfu Lakes area was selected as a SMA by the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, with the current proposal designating the area as a Natural Environment Park with no up-front mineral withdrawal upon signing the Final Agreement. In 2001, the Yukon Department of Economic Development carried out a regional mineral assessment, which reviewed the geologic data for SW Yukon and ranked the tracts. The proposed Snafu/Tarfu SMA lies within Cache Creek Terrane and is composed of a complex succession of Mississippian to Permian basalt, shallow water carbonates, chert and greywacke, overlain by Triassic to early Jurassic interbedded chert and greywacke.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 12, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Provincial

The proposed Pickhandle Lakes Special Management Area (SMA) consists of 50.2 square kilometers in southwest Yukon on NTS map sheet 115F/16. The Yukon and Canadian Governments and Kluane and White River First Nations agreed to create a SMA, to be designated as a Habitat Protection Area, which covers Pickhandle Lake and the surrounding wetlands. The Habit Protection Area designation does not require the withdrawal of the area from mineral staking and withdrawal has not been requested in the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Governments of Canada, Yukon and the First Nations. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the detailed mineral assessment of an approximately 281.7 km2 area that encompassed the proposed Special Management Area.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Provincial

Yukon Government, Liard First Nations, and Ross River Dena Council agreed to create a Special Management Area designated as Natural Environment Park over Frances Lake. The Frances Lake SMA covers an area of significant Pb-Zn-Cu mineralization and multi-element geochemical anomalies, abuts to Cominco's advanced Fin prospect, and encloses quartz claims over the Matt Berry deposit. Field work conducted in the summers of 2000 and 2001 showed that: mineralization in the Matt Berry deposit is related to a previously unreported volcanic belt that extends over 30 km to the northwest; Matt Berry deposit has characteristics of VMS-style deposits, such as those in the Finlayson Lake Belt; the style of deformation interpreted for the Matt Berry suggests repetition of the mineralized unit at depth; Maxi prospect is a significant exploration target. A detailed mineral assessment of the area bounded by Robert Campbell Highway and Nahanni Range Road shows the highest mineral potential along a belt in the western part of the area, which coincides with the core of the proposed SMA.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 12, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Provincial

The Yukon and Canadian Governments and White River First Nation agreed to create a 530.30 km2 Special Management Area designated as a Habitat Protection Area that cover Wellesley Lake and the surrounding wetlands. It is currently proposed that Selkirk First Nation will add this SMA to their Final Agreement. The Habitat Protection Area designation does not require the withdrawal of the area from mineral staking and withdrawal has not been requested in the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Governments of Canada and Yukon and the First Nations. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the detailed mineral assessment of an approximately 1094 km2 area that encompassed the proposed Special Management Area.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Provincial

This report outlines the results and the conclusions of a study of the mineral potential of the Eagle Plains area. The accompanying mineral potential map ranks the different tracts according to their relative order of mineral potential, from highest to lowest. The highest ranking rocks occur on the flanks of the Richardson Anticlinorium which corresponds to the flanks of the southern Richardson Mountains. Other contributions resulting from this study include: complete geochemical coverage of the area provided by a new Regional Geochemical Survey and reanalysis of silt samples of a pre-existing survey; the discovery of several new mineral occurrences; the discovery of rocks of possible volcanic origin, previously undocumented in the area; and modifications to the pre-existing geology maps.

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey, Yukon Data, Government information
Provincial

A mineral assessment of the Tombstone Study Area was undertaken by the Department of Economic Development in the summer of 1998 at the request of the Department of Renewable Resources. The purpose of the mineral assessment was to produce a mineral potential map, which was to be used to assist with the finalization of the boundaries of the Tombstone Territorial Park. Following an initial compilation, a field program was designed to document known mineral occurrences, test and improve the existing regional mapping, investigate geochemical anomalies, characterize favourable environments for mineralization, sample for lithogeochemistry, and prospect for mineralization. A field program resulted in the discovery of several new mineral occurrences, as well as the discovery of previously unmapped geological formations.

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: PDF HTML other
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey, Yukon Data, Government information
Provincial

The mineral potential of the Northern Kluane Wildlife Sanctuary (KWS) is rated as HIGH. Within the KWS, rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane rate the highest as they include two mineral deposits with proven reserves, one past producer, favorable stratigraphy for a variety of mineral deposits with production history and proven reserves elsewhere in the Cordillera as well as over 45 mineral occurrences within the boundaries of the KWS. Ultramafic hosted Ni-Cu-PGE; Fe, Cu, Au skarn, replacement or basaltic copper, VMS and polymetallic vein deposits are hosted in this belt of extremely high mineral potential. Pennsylvanian and post-accretionnary Cretaceous and Tertiary plutons are also of high potential for a variety of mineral deposit types including porphyry copper, epithermal gold and silver, skarns and polymetallic veins.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 12, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Federal

The dataset contains the extents of mineral claims of Nunavut. A mineral claim is an area of Crown Land that is staked out by an individual or Mineral Exploration Company that holds a valid Prospectors license. This grants the individual or mineral exploration company the mineral rights to the staked out piece of land as provided for under the Nunavut Mining Regulations, SOR/214-69. If the holder of a mineral claim wishes to produce minerals from the claim, or to hold it for more than ten years, the holder must apply for a lease of the claim.

Last Updated: Feb. 11, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 15, 2015
Organization: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
Formats: SHP XML KML WMS FGDB/GDB WFS CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Mineral Claims, Mining Leases, Coal Licences, Exploration, Nunavut, Mineral Tenure, Mining industry, Coal, Prospecting
Federal

The dataset contains the extents of mineral leases of Nunavut. A mineral lease is a mineral claim that has been surveyed by a Canada Lands Surveyor. A mineral lease can be applied for after an exploration Prospecting company has done a minimum of representation work in the claim area and if a legal survey on the claim has been recorded. A mineral lease is required for disposal or sale of minerals or of a gross value of more than $100,000 in one year.

Last Updated: Aug. 27, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 15, 2015
Organization: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
Formats: SHP XML KML WMS FGDB/GDB WFS CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Mineral Claims, Mining Leases, Coal Licences, Exploration, Nunavut, Mineral Tenure, Mining industry, Coal, Prospecting
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