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Found 10 records similar to Coastal Species at Risk - Prince Edward Island

Federal

Existing invasive exotic species and the potential introduction of new invasive species pose a threat to forest biodiversity and function. The PEI National Park invasive species composite measure consists of two annual field measurements: the percentage of forest ecosystem with invasive species present (measured by proportion of 244, 441 m2 quadrats covering the forest ecosystem), and the percentage of total forest area (ha) with invasive species present. The measure includes four invasive plants and one insect: Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata), Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum), Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), and Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus), and Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar), which is measured for presence only.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invasive species, garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata, glossy buckthorn, Frangula alnus, Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum, gypsy moth
Federal

Odonata monitoring is conducted in four shallow water ponds within the wetland ecosystems of PEI National Park. Park staff collect exuviae (the remains of aquatic larval stage exoskeleton) of metamorphosed larvae from the order odonata twice per year: in the early summer (June) and late summer (August) during peak emergence periods. The objective of the measure is to acquire baseline data on the species diversity and relative abundance of dragonflies and damselflies within wetlands of the national park. Taxonomic diversity and abundance are compared against historical levels to assess ecological integrity.

Last Updated: Oct. 8, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, wetlands, odonata, dragonflies, biodiversity, exuviae
Federal

Plant Watch is a national program which has been incorporated into ecological integrity monitoring in PEI National Park. The program adds to understanding of how common plant phenology is responding to climate change. PEI National Park monitors the first bloom Julian dates of five species within the wetland and coastal ecosystems: Bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica), Beach Pea (Lathyrus japonicus), Wildrose (Rosa virginiana), Rhodora (Rhododendron canadense), and Labrador Tea (Ledum groenlandicum).

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, PlantWatch, first bloom, bunchberry, Cornus Canadensis, starflower, Trientalis borealis, red maple, Acer rubrum
Federal

Forest canopy or over-story species composition provides useful information on forest tree species present at the stand and landscape level. Much of PEI National Park’s forest areas were cleared for settlement and agriculture prior to park establishment and have regenerated with early successional softwood species. Forest types, stand area (ha), percent canopy crown coverage and the proportion (percent) of tree species present within National Park forested areas are determined by remote sensing experts every 10 years, where the proportion of PEI National Parks forest ecosystem that is comprised of softwood species is calculated. The observed percent softwood forested area within PEI National Park is compared against the expected percent of softwood composition generated using available soil information to conjecture original forest types and softwood composition by applying Nova Scotia’s Eco-site Classification.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, forest, composition, tree species, crown
Federal

In PEI National Park tree health and growth are monitored in 20 long-term permanent forest monitoring plots. These plots were established in 2006 in mature white spruce forests under the Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMAN) program. The measure reports on tree species dominance, recruitment, and growth. Field measurements include species, diameter at breast height (DBH), and tree condition.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 24, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, forest health, trees, growth, recruitment, key tree species
Federal

Hydrological inputs and outputs determine water depth, flow patterns, and duration and frequency of flooding. The seasonal pattern of changes in a wetland’s water level is called the hydroperiod. Year-to-year variability of hydroperiod is related to climate and site specific conditions. Hydrologic conditions primarily affect abiotic factors such as nutrient availability, soil chemistry, and water chemistry which all, in turn, determine the biotic components (species composition, species richness, primary productivity) of wetland ecosystems.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, hydrology, water level, flow index, flow, hydroperiod, Richards-Baker Index (RBI), wetland, water level loggers
Federal

Stream benthic invertebrates are important indicators of aquatic health and have been monitored in PEI National Park to assess community diversity as well as abundance of pollution tolerant and intolerant taxa in streams. Benthic invertebrates are collected on an annual basis using the sampling methods developed by Environment Canada for the "CABIN" stream monitoring network. Samples are sorted and invertebrates are classified to the lowest possible taxomonic classification to determine abundance and biodiversity in these aquatic ecosystems. Community biodiversity is assessed using the Simpson’s reciprocal index (D).

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invertebrates, benthic, CABIN, diversity, abundance, pollution, stream
Federal

Freshwater ponds are monitored annually for fish species diversity and American eel abundance (catch per unit effort, or CUE), and American eel total length. Hoop traps and gee-type minnow traps are used to sample fish communities in four ponds within PEI National Park. Each pond is sampled over a three day period with a fishing effort of 3 trap nights in 9 different trap sectors of a pond. Species abundance is recorded for each net.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, freshwater, fish, biodiversity, community, pond, abundance, American eel, Anguilla rostrata
Federal

Plant Watch is a national program which has been incorporated into ecological integrity monitoring in PEI National Park. The program adds to understanding of how common plant phenology is responding to climate change. PEI National Park monitors the first bloom Julian dates of four species within the forest ecosystem: Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Eastern Larch (Larix laricina), Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis), and Starflower (Trientalis borealis).

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, PlantWatch, first bloom, bunchberry, Cornus Canadensis, starflower, Trientalis borealis, red maple, Acer rubrum
Federal

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an alien invasive species that is considered a threat to wetland plant community biodiversity. In PEI National Park, annual monitoring focuses on distribution within the park and individual wetlands, as well as density once detected. Assessing management effectiveness is also a goal of the monitoring program. Each year all known sites containing purple loosestrife are surveyed during the blooming period and management actions (i.e.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, wetlands, invasive species, purple loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria
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