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Found 10 records similar to Snow Cover Duration - Tundra - Vuntut

Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 30, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, permafrost
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, permafrost
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, snow
Federal

Wapusk National Park is a sub-Arctic protected area covered with snow for over half of the year. Snowpack characteristics can provide important clues to impacts of climate change and park ecological integrity. Snow cover duration and characteristics affect soil and plant and animal components of the ecosystem. Current predictions for Wapusk are that with warming temperatures, snow in the Hudson Bay region will increase in amount but will stay for a shorter duration.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  microclimate, snowpack, weather stations, year-round, snow depth, rain, wind speed, wind direction, air temperature
Federal

The map shows the location of the continuous permafrost zone and the discontinuous permafrost zone including areas of wide spread permafrost, areas of scattered permafrost and permafrost areas in the Cordillera. The map also indicates for six locations (Inuvik, Yellowknife, Thompson, Resolute, Rankin Inlet and Schefferville) the thickness of permafrost in metres and the ground temperature. Permafrost is a term used to describe the thermal condition of earth materials, such as soil and rock, when their temperature remains below 0 degrees Celsius continuously for more than 1 year. One-half of Canada's land surface is underlain by permafrost.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  hydrogeology, hydrology, permafrost
Federal

Wapusk National Park protects a vast landscape of coastal salt marshes, countless lakes and ponds, and a diversity of boreal-tundra interface habitats, and serves as staging areas for migrating birds, and habitat for a diversity of wildlife. Shallow lakes and ponds are created in part by thermokarst processes resulting from the melting of ground ice in areas underlain by permafrost. In northern areas, climate change brings fluctuations in temperature, permafrost and snow fall and cover which affect lake dynamics, water composition and water levels, and the plants and animals dependent on them. Lake hydrology is assessed based on hydroelocological methods developed during the International Polar Year in Vuntut National Park, and initiated in Wapusk in 2010 by the Hydroecological Team, a multidisciplinary research group from Wilfrid Laurier University and University of Waterloo led by Dr. Brent Wolfe.

Last Updated: Jul. 11, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Thermokarst processes, water samples, stable isotope, hydrology, Wapusk National Park, climate change, Evaporation/Input ratio, E/I ratio, wetlands
Federal

Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the Innuitian Mountains. Permanent sea ice occurs in the northern part of the Arctic Ocean.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, permafrost
Federal

Permafrost and the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually, known as the active layer, are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 1999, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed in Quttinirpaaq National Park near Tanquary Fiord as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Quttinirpaaq National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Ellesmere Island, Tanquary Fiord
Federal

Permafrost and the active layer (the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually) are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 2009, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed in Auyuittuq National Park near Owl River as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: May 30, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Auyuittuq National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Owl River, Akshayuk Pass
Federal

Permafrost loss is pervasive across northern circumpolar regions. The loss of frozen ground has profound impacts on water resources at varying spatial and temporal scales via changes to predominant hydrological processes, runoff pathways and entrainment rates of solutes and sediments. Consensus exists that permafrost loss will continue, and rates will vary spatially, but how hydrology and biogeochemistry will respond across large swaths of land remains largely unknown. Previous research elucidated small-scale processes or described circumpolar trends, with minimal cross-scale research.

Last Updated: Aug. 5, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 30, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML ZIP
Keywords:  Water, Environmental Model, Permafrost, Water Quantity, Streamflow, Water Chemistry, Vulnerability, Yukon, Northwest Territories
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