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Found 10 records similar to Harlequin duck abundance - Gros Morne

Federal

The Harlequin duck is a species at risk that occurs in the Torngat Mountains National Park. Fast-flowing rivers and streams constitute its breeding habitat but it is known to forgo breeding when abundance of aquatic insects is low. A helicopter survey is conducted every five years in late- July to count Harlequin ducks and other species at risk (Barrow's Goldeneye, Peregrine falcon, Polar bear) along the park's rivers and fjords. Harlequin ducks are counted and brood size and age is recorded.

Last Updated: Jun. 20, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Harlequin duck, abundance, broods, productivity, helicopter surveys, Labrador
Federal

Beavers are important ecosystem architects, creating wetland habitats, thickets and meadows by damming streams and cutting down woody vegetation along stream banks. This measure consist of an aerial survey of the number of active beaver colonies in lowland forests of Gros Morne National Park. It is conducted every fifth year in the Fall.

Last Updated: Jun. 20, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  North American Beaver, Castor canadensis, beaver lodges, Aerial Survey, Newfoundland
Federal

Stream hydrology strongly affects habitat quality for most stream-dwelling species, and is affected by both climate and land use. This measure, which is colocated with stream temperature regime, reports on flow parameters in 10-12 park streams over time - using in-situ water level data loggers, as well as hydrometric stations.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hydrology, Stream Flow, Water Level, Environment Canada, data loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Stream thermal regime has important consequences for aquatic organisms, and is sensitive to climate and land use. The Park is monitoring thermal regimes at 10 sites annually from spring to fall using temperature loggers. The water temperature is recorded hourly and these data used to assess the suitability of the thermal environment of streams for Brook Trout.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream Thermal Regime, Salmonid temperature stress, Temperature Loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

The Island of Newfoundland is home to the most southerly population of Rock Ptarmigan in North America and is the only place where the subspecies Lagopus mutus welchi can be found. Rock Ptarmigan are the only species of bird that live year round in the Alpine tundra of Gros Morne. This measure aims at a population count and trend for breeding Rock Ptarmigan on top of Gros Morne Mountain. The survey occurs yearly, between May 26 and June 1.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Rock Ptarmigan, Lagopus muta, alpine tundra, Gros Morne Mountain, Visual Counts, Newfoundland
Federal

Atlantic salmon are an ecologically and culturally important species in healthy aquatic systems of western Newfoundland. This measure determines the status and trend, over a 10 year period, of Atlantic salmon returning to spawn in three rivers in Gros Morne - Western Brook, Trout River and Deer Arm Brook. Secondarily, it will detect invasive anadromous species. A salmonid counting fence is rotated through the 3 rivers.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Atlantic salmon, Western Brook, Deer Arm Brook, Trout River, Fish Fence, non-native anadromous fish, Newfoundland
Provincial

Distribution of diving duck species habitat in coastal British Columbia showing relative abundance (RA) by season and overall relative importance (RI). RI is based on project region and not on the province as a whole. CRIMS is a legacy dataset of BC coastal resource data that was acquired in a systematic and synoptic manner from 1979 and was intermittently updated throughout the years. Resource information was collected in nine study areas using a peer-reviewed provincial Resource Information Standards Committee consisting of DFO Fishery Officers, First Nations, and other subject matter experts.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  Canada, Seabirds, biology, diving duck, duck, habitat, marine bird, moulting, ornithology
Provincial

Distribution of dabbling duck species habitat in coastal British Columbia showing relative abundance (RA) by season and overall relative importance (RI). RI is based on project region and not on the province as a whole. CRIMS is a legacy dataset of BC coastal resource data that was acquired in a systematic and synoptic manner from 1979 and was intermittently updated throughout the years. Resource information was collected in nine study areas using a peer-reviewed provincial Resource Information Standards Committee consisting of DFO Fishery Officers, First Nations, and other subject matter experts.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  Canada, Seabirds, biology, dabbling duck, duck, habitat, marine bird, ornithology, overwintering
Federal

Introduced Moose, lacking natural predators in Gros Morne, are causing widespread damage in park forests. Park-wide Moose density will be monitored using aerial surveys and estimated using the Gasaway (1986) stratified random block method. Bull, cow, calf and unknown Moose are counted in randomly-selected blocks expected to have extremely high, high and low moose density. Survey occurs in late February or March, with sufficient snow cover to see tracks.

Last Updated: Jun. 13, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Moose, introduced herbivore, overbrowsing, Aerial Survey, Newfoundland
Federal

Abundance and diversity of frogs and toads is a good indicator for assessing ecological integrity. The park visually counts adult frogs and toads in coastal wetlands after the breeding season. This method does not permit assessment of early breeding species and may overestimate frog abundance because these surveys coincide with mass emergence of newly developed frogs, which are subjected to very high mortality rates.

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Wetlands, Frogs, Toads, Abundance, Georgian Bay, Ontario
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