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Found 10 records similar to Directory of Restorative Justice

Federal

This report is organized to reflect the rich information gathered from the Listening Project on Crime Victims’ Experiences of Restorative Justice. The structure of this report is as follows:

• background on restorative justice and its relationship with crime victims,
• an overview of the Listening Project,
• findings on the needs of victims of crime and how restorative justice did and did not meet those needs,
• suggestions from Listening Project participants on how to enhance meaningful victim involvement, and;
• feedback and conclusion.

Last Updated: Jul. 24, 2019
Date Published: May 1, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Restorative justice, Justice systems, Victims, Research
Federal

The following concepts detailed in the publication were taken from an article written by Howard Zehr and Henry Mika, (1998),"Fundamental Concepts in Restorative Justice", in Contemporary Justice Review, Vol. 1.

At the primary level, restorative justice in Canada is guided by recognizing the need for victims to heal and put right the wrongs. Restorative Justice also grounds itself in engaging with community and recognizing the need for dialogue between victims and offenders as appropriate.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 22, 2016
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Access to Information, Restorative Justice, Criminal Justice, Justice Canada Publications
Federal

Restorative Justice (RJ) is an approach to justice that focuses on addressing the harm caused by crime while holding the offender responsible for his or her actions, by providing an opportunity for those directly affected by crime – victims, offenders and communities – to identify and address their needs in the aftermath of a crime. RJ is intended to support healing, reintegration, the prevention of future harm, and reparation, if possible.

RJ processes provide opportunities for victims, offenders, and communities affected by a crime to communicate about the causes, circumstances, and impact of that crime, and to address their related needs. These processes are guided by skilled RJ facilitators and can take different forms depending on the community, program, case, participants, or circumstances.

Last Updated: Jul. 24, 2019
Date Published: Jun. 1, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Research in Brief, Restorative Justice, Justice system, Victims
Federal

Restorative Justice (RJ) is based on an understanding that crime causes harm to people and relationships, and it affects communities. RJ is an approach to justice that seeks to repair harm by providing an opportunity for those harmed and those who take responsibility for the harm to communicate about causes, circumstances, and impacts of crime, and to address their needs. RJ seeks to foster healing, reparation and reintegration, while also seeking to prevent future harm.

Last Updated: Jan. 27, 2023
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Restorative justice; access to justice; victims, criminal justice; youth justice
Federal

Canadians indicated they are not very familiar with restorative justice (RJ), but after receiving an explanation, the majority of Canadians support the use of RJ and see the process as an effective way to repair harms caused by crime.

Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues
Federal

Canadians indicated that they are not very familiar with restorative justice (RJ), but after receiving an explanation, the majority of Canadians support the use of RJ and see the process as an effective way to repair the harms caused by crime. What we also found:
Most Canadians (87%) indicated that victims should be able to meet with the offender and tell them about the impacts of the crime if they wish to do so. Over half (64%) of Canadians indicated that RJ should be available to all victims and offenders, regardless of the offence type, as long as both the victim and offender want to take part in the process and the offender admits his or her guilt. Given the lack of knowledge about RJ, it is not surprising that some Canadians (39%) still have questions or concerns about the RJ process.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 8, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Restorative Justice
Federal

The virtual panel explored how Indigenous justice, RJ or customary law approaches are used in two First Nations and one Inuit context. The panel helped to highlight that while RJ principles may have strong parallels to Indigenous legal principles and traditions, they are not the same thing. Several panellists highlighted the fundamental importance of community relationships in Indigenous justice approaches and the goal of meeting the needs of the collective rather than focusing primarily on the reparation of harm for an individual. Canada’s adoption of the UN Declaration and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report provide support to Indigenous nations and groups that are asserting their rights to maintain and reclaim their own justice systems and legal traditions as an expression of the larger right of self-determination.

Last Updated: Sep. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 1, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  access to justice; dispute prevention and resolution; Indigenous justice; restorative justice
Federal

This annotated bibliography provides a comprehensive inventory and accessible summary of research and scholarly discussions on RJ in cases of adult sexual violence. The annotated bibliography is organized into two main sections: 1) quantitative or qualitative assessments of RJ programs and their outcomes in cases of adult sexual violence, and 2) critical commentary and discussions.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Jul. 23, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Restorative justice, Justice systems, Sexual offences
Federal

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS), now known as the Indigenous Justice Program, supports community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Created to provide alternatives to the mainstream system, the Indigenous Justice program provides funding to communities through two categories: The Community-Based Justice fund and the Capacity-Building Fund. Community-Based Justice currently funds 197 community-based programs that serve over 750 communities.he objectives of the Community-Based Justice Fund component are:

to allow Indigenous people the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities;
to help reduce the rates of crime and incarceration among Indigenous people in communities with cost-shared programs; and,
to foster improved responsiveness, fairness, inclusiveness, and effectiveness of the justice system with respect to justice and its administration so as to meet the needs and aspirations of Indigenous people. The Capacity-Building Fund is designed to support capacity-building efforts in Indigenous communities, particularly as they relate to building increased knowledge and skills for the establishment and management of community-based justice programs.

Last Updated: Feb. 24, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2015
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Indigenous Justice Systems, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Reconciliation, Community engagement, Restorative Justice
Federal

Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis – listed as Endangered under the Species At Risk Act) and Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis- recommended as Endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) have undergone extensive population declines across much of their range due to a number of interacting factors. An introduced pathogen (blister rust - Cronartium ribicola) and an increasing severity of native beetle outbreaks (mountain pine beetle - Dendroctonus ponderosae) coupled with a reduced natural fire regime and changes in climate have all contributed to their decline. Restoration actions are those undertaken to improve conditions for rust resistant seedlings by opening up the canopy at sites targeted for future planting. In Waterton - restoration actions are primarily from small prescribed fires designed to mimic the effects of natural lightening ignited fires.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  whitebark pine, limber pine, blister rust, mountain pine beetles, restoration, prescribed fires, rust resistant seedlings, Alberta
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