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Found 10 records similar to Panel Discussion Report: Indigenous and Restorative Justice Approaches

Federal

Restorative Justice (RJ) is an approach to justice that focuses on addressing the harm caused by crime while holding the offender responsible for his or her actions, by providing an opportunity for those directly affected by crime – victims, offenders and communities – to identify and address their needs in the aftermath of a crime. RJ is intended to support healing, reintegration, the prevention of future harm, and reparation, if possible.

RJ processes provide opportunities for victims, offenders, and communities affected by a crime to communicate about the causes, circumstances, and impact of that crime, and to address their related needs. These processes are guided by skilled RJ facilitators and can take different forms depending on the community, program, case, participants, or circumstances.

Last Updated: Jul. 24, 2019
Date Published: Jun. 1, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Research in Brief, Restorative Justice, Justice system, Victims
Federal

Canadians indicated they are not very familiar with restorative justice (RJ), but after receiving an explanation, the majority of Canadians support the use of RJ and see the process as an effective way to repair harms caused by crime.

Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues
Federal

In consultation and cooperation with Indigenous and provincial and territorial partners, Justice Canada is developing an Indigenous Justice Strategy to address systemic discrimination and the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the justice system.
In the spirit of reconciliation, and out of respect for Indigenous rights to self-determination, Justice Canada recognizes that the development of an Indigenous Justice Strategy must be informed by First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
Working closely with Indigenous partners on the development of an Indigenous Justice Strategy will be an opportunity to inform and put in place effective and concrete measures, informed by the lived experiences of First Nations, Inuit and Métis, to improve Canada’s justice system.
The Indigenous Justice Strategy will be developed in five phases.

Last Updated: Oct. 25, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation, Systemic Discrimination, Reconciliation
Federal

Young people identified overrepresentation of the Indigenous population in Canada’s Criminal Justice System (CJS) as unfair, and largely a result of societal discrimination as well as systemic discrimination in the justice system. They also felt that it was symptomatic of the poverty and intergenerational trauma affecting Indigenous communities.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Young offenders, Aboriginal affairs, Aboriginal peoples, Aboriginal youth, Criminal justice, Legal issues, Research
Federal

Canadians indicated that they are not very familiar with restorative justice (RJ), but after receiving an explanation, the majority of Canadians support the use of RJ and see the process as an effective way to repair the harms caused by crime. What we also found:
Most Canadians (87%) indicated that victims should be able to meet with the offender and tell them about the impacts of the crime if they wish to do so. Over half (64%) of Canadians indicated that RJ should be available to all victims and offenders, regardless of the offence type, as long as both the victim and offender want to take part in the process and the offender admits his or her guilt. Given the lack of knowledge about RJ, it is not surprising that some Canadians (39%) still have questions or concerns about the RJ process.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 8, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Restorative Justice
Federal

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada released 94 Calls to Action (CTA) to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation. In CTA 40, the Commission focussed on victims’ programs and services by calling on all levels of government, in collaboration with Indigenous people, to create adequately funded and accessible Indigenous-specific victim programs and services as well as appropriate evaluation mechanisms to measure their effectiveness. There are several elements to this CTA, and this collection of papers is focused on the component of CTA 40 that calls for “appropriate evaluation mechanisms” within a victim services context. The Department of Justice Canada (the Department) engaged with four Indigenous evaluation subject matter experts to explore Indigenous approaches and methods used in evaluation and research.

Last Updated: Sep. 26, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2020
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  access to justice, Indigenous justice, Victims, Justice system and policy
Federal

Indigenous people are overrepresented in Canada's criminal justice system as both victims and offenders. National data on Indigenous people in the criminal justice system includes data on self-reported victimization , police-reported homicide, and provincial/territorial and federal custody. In 2014/2015, Indigenous adults accounted for 26% of provincial/territorial custody admissions and 25% of the in-custody federal offender population. The proportion of Indigenous adults in custody was about 9 times higher than their representation in the adult population (3%).

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 2, 2017
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Criminality, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation
Federal

The Directive on Civil Litigation Involving Indigenous Peoples will guide the Government of Canada’s legal approaches, positions and decisions taken in civil litigation involving Aboriginal and treaty rights, and the Crown’s obligation towards Indigenous peoples. The Directive is part of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada’s work to review the Government of Canada’s litigation strategy. This is to ensure the Government’s legal positions are consistent with its commitments, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canadian values. Consistent with the Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples, the Directive emphasizes the importance of resolving conflicts expeditiously and collaboratively, reducing the use of litigation and the courts.

Last Updated: May 3, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Litigation, Reconciliation, Aboriginal Peoples, Attorney General
Federal

This annotated bibliography provides a comprehensive inventory and accessible summary of research and scholarly discussions on RJ in cases of adult sexual violence. The annotated bibliography is organized into two main sections: 1) quantitative or qualitative assessments of RJ programs and their outcomes in cases of adult sexual violence, and 2) critical commentary and discussions.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Jul. 23, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Restorative justice, Justice systems, Sexual offences
Federal

The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS), now known as the Indigenous Justice Program, supports community-based justice programs that offer alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Created to provide alternatives to the mainstream system, the Indigenous Justice program provides funding to communities through two categories: The Community-Based Justice fund and the Capacity-Building Fund. Community-Based Justice currently funds 197 community-based programs that serve over 750 communities.he objectives of the Community-Based Justice Fund component are:

to allow Indigenous people the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities;
to help reduce the rates of crime and incarceration among Indigenous people in communities with cost-shared programs; and,
to foster improved responsiveness, fairness, inclusiveness, and effectiveness of the justice system with respect to justice and its administration so as to meet the needs and aspirations of Indigenous people. The Capacity-Building Fund is designed to support capacity-building efforts in Indigenous communities, particularly as they relate to building increased knowledge and skills for the establishment and management of community-based justice programs.

Last Updated: Feb. 24, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2015
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Indigenous Justice Systems, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Reconciliation, Community engagement, Restorative Justice
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