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Found 10 records similar to Aquatic fish inventory - Jasper

Federal

Both native and non-native fish inhabit many lakes and ponds across Jasper National Park. Prior to stocking practices in the past, many lakes in Jasper National Park did not have fish or had a low diversity fish assemblage. These past stocking practices have altered fish communities today. Introduced non-native fish may outcompete some native fish populations and the stocking of historical natural fishless lakes may affect their food webs.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Parc, native species, invasive species, introduced species, freshwater fish, occurrence
Federal

The unimpeded movement of fish and other aquatic related organisms allows organisms to respond to changing habitat conditions, facilitates genetic dispersal, provides access to seasonal or reproductive habitats, and allows for the maintenance of populations over the long term. Jasper National Park monitors the catchment area size for all culverts associated with creeks Strahler order 4 or less going through them and with perennial water flow. The dataset shows whether the culvert is a fish passage or not (i.e. barrier free or with a status of remediated from the first culvert evaluation in 2005).

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, habitat, stream, river, aquatic, freshwater, watercourses, aquatic connectivity, culvert
Federal

Bat monitoring in Jasper National Park supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Survey efforts are increasingly important on account of the recent detection of white-nosed syndrome in western North America and evidence that the disease is spreading more readily. Data collected from hibernacula and maternity roost monitoring help determine species composition and relative abundance to inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, bats, hibernacula, maternity roost, Chiroptera
Federal

Motion-detection cameras are a cost-effective and non-invasive tool used in Jasper National Park for sampling mammal populations and estimating species occurrence. Occupancy modelling, which uses detection/non-detection data from cameras, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses. Data are collected throughout the year across Jasper National Park to determine change in the distribution of key animal populations as well as supporting demographic predictions to better inform management.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, motion-detection cameras, camera trap, mammal population, species
Federal

Bat monitoring in Jasper National Park supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan and it is part of the NABat continent-wide program to estimate population trends and distribution. Survey efforts are increasingly important on account of the recent detection of white-nosed syndrome in western North America and evidence that the disease is spreading more readily. The use of ultrasonic frequency recorders help determine species composition and relative abundance to inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, bats, NABat, Chiroptera
Federal

Amphibians around the world are in decline and this has led to many international initiatives to monitor and catalog amphibian biodiversity.
The western toad (Bufo boreas) found in Jasper National Park is a species of special concern protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Jasper National Park conducts auditory and visual amphibian surveys to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling of amphibians in the Park, using presence/absence data, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses and helps inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, amphibians, frog, toad, salamander, western toad, Bufo boreas
Provincial

The Fish Management Zone dataset is comprised of all the polygons that represent the Fish Management Zones in Alberta. Fish Management Zone is an area having its own unique assemblage of water bodies, species of game fish and management regimes.

Last Updated: Sep. 14, 2022
Date Published: May 17, 2018
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML
Keywords:  BOUNDARIES, FISH-MANAGEMENT, FISH-MANAGEMENT-ZONE, FISH-MANAGEMENT-ZONES, Government information
Federal

Jasper National Park uses a reference condition approach to monitor benthic macroinvertebrates in the stream and river ecosystems within the park. The taxonomic counts of the benthic macroinvertebrates from test sites are compared to that of the reference sites.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, benthic macroinvertebrates, stream, river, freshwater ecosystem
Federal

Common nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) inventory supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Common nighthawks are a Threatened Species protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Common nighthawks migrate north between early May to mid-June to breed in or near open or semi-open sites across a variety of habitats. During the breeding season, data are collected at these sites by audio recorders to determine presence/nesting and inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Species at Risk Act, SARA, Chordeiles minor, Common nighthawk
Federal

Elk (Cervus canadensis) are generally considered a keystone species across a variety of landscapes. Elk (C. canandenis nelsoni) in Jasper National Park is one of four extant subspecies of elk occurring in North America. They are an important wildlife component in the Park regarding the management of human-wildlife conflict and understanding caribou/wolf population dynamics. Every five years, data are collected by aerial surveys over set transects across the Park to estimate population size and composition and inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Elk, Cervus canadensis nelsoni, aerial survey, population
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