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Found 10 records similar to Offshore Ecological and Human Use Information considered in Marine Protected Area Network Design in the Scotian Shelf Bioregion

Federal

The spatial planning framework for Canada's national network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is comprised of 13 ecologically defined bioregions that cover Canada's oceans and the Great Lakes. Note that the geographic boundaries for the bioregions are fuzzy and may change based on ecosystemic conditions. Detailed descriptions and discussions on the federal network of marine bioregions can be found in:

  • DFO. 2009.
Last Updated: Apr. 22, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 23, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP PDF FGDB/GDB ESRI REST WMS
Keywords:  Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Arctic Ocean, Canada, Marine conservation areas, Aquatic ecosystems, Integrated management, Marine heritage
Federal

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are one among a number of spatial management tools, and are defined as areas that are established for the long-term, and managed through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long-term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values.

Currently, Fisheries and Oceans Canada has a number of MPAs designated under the Oceans Act and Areas of Interest for new MPAs at various stages of progress towards designation. These areas are ecologically significant, with species and/or features that require special management consideration. 

An Oceans Act MPA can be established for any of the six conservation purposes outlined in the Act:

• The conservation and protection of commercial and non-commercial fishery resources, including marine mammals, and their habitats; 

• The conservation and protection of endangered or threatened marine species, and their habitats; 

• The conservation and protection of unique habitats; 

• The conservation and protection of marine areas of high biodiversity or biological productivity;

• The conservation and protection of any other marine resource or habitat as is necessary to fulfill the mandate of the Minister; and

• The conservation and protection of marine areas for the purposes of maintaining ecological integrity

Last Updated: Dec. 2, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 20, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP FGDB/GDB WMS KML PDF ESRI REST
Keywords:  Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, MPA, Conservation, Marine heritage, Marine conservation areas, Regulations
Federal

The Coastal Environmental Baseline Program is a multi-year Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiative designed to work with Indigenous and local communities and other key parties to collect coastal environmental data at six pilot sites across Canada (Port of Vancouver, Port of Prince Rupert, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Port of Saint John, Placentia Bay, and Iqaluit). The goal of the Program is to gather local information in these areas in effort to build a better understanding of marine ecological conditions. The Maritimes region has developed a habitat classification program to align with the oceanographic interests and data needs of local communities and stakeholders, with the goal of sharing this information via open data. In 2020, a habitat survey in the lower Musquash Marine Protected Area (MPA) was undertaken to further develop this project, using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) equipped with high-frequency (450 kHz) side scan sonar to build a habitat map of the MPA.

Last Updated: Feb. 26, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 8, 2022
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: TIFF FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST PDF
Keywords:  automated underwater vehicle, sonar, Doppler velocity log, salinity, water temperature, i3XO EcoMapper, Estuaries, Coastal waters, Oceanography
Federal

A coastal surficial substrate layer for the coastal Scotian Shelf and Bay of Fundy. To create the layer, previous geological characterizations from NRCan were translated into consistent substrate and habitat characterizations; including surficial grain size and primary habitat type. In areas where no geological description was available, data including digital elevation models and substrate samples from NRCan, CHS and DFO Science were interpreted to produce a regional scale substrate and habitat characterization. Each characterization in the layer was given a ranking of confidence and original data resolution to ensure that decision makers are informed of the quality and scale of data that went into each interpretation.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 3, 2022
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Coastal Habitat, Marine Habitat, Oceans, Gulf of Maine and Bay of Fundy, Scotian Shelf, Physical sciences
Federal

Data from the analysis of sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, bottom temperature, and bottom salinity, over the Gulf of Maine and Scotian Shelf, for 23 CMIP6 models. The analysis includes an evaluation of CMIP6 model performance for the CMIP6 historical (1950-2014) experiment. Future projections are summarized for CMIP6 scenarios SSP245 and SSP370 with the calculation of relative annual and seasonal changes between the historical period (1950-2014) and three future periods (2030-2039, 2040-2049, 2030-2049). Wang, Z., DeTracey, B., Maniar, A., Greenan, B., Gilbert, D. and Brickman, D., Future hydrographic state of the Scotian Shelf and Gulf of Maine from 23 CMIP6 models.

Last Updated: Aug. 9, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2022
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: XLSX FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

The excessive input of nitrogen derived from human land-use activities remains a major cause of the eutrophication of coastal ecosystems around the world. However, little data exist on rates of nutrient pollution or its potential impacts to coastal ecosystems in Atlantic Canada. To fill this knowledge gap, a Nitrogen Loading Model (NLM) framework was applied to determine the Total Nitrogen Load (kg TN / yr) from point and non-point source inputs (wastewater, atmospheric deposition, land use, fertilizer applications, and regional industries) in 109 coastal watersheds bordering the Bay of Fundy and Scotian Shelf. To evaluate the potential impact of nitrogen loading, two indicators were calculated for 40 coastal embayments: (1) ∆N, a measure of nitrogen residency that predicts dissolved oxygen problems; and (2) the estuary loading rate, a predictor of the potential for loss of submerged aquatic vegetation.

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 5, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: FGDB/GDB CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Nov. 4, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Sponge Grounds, Sponge, Porifera, Western II A, Marine biology
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Sea Pen Field, Sea Pen, Pennatulacea, Western II A, Marine biology
Federal

The Scotian Shelf population of northern bottlenose whales (Hyperoodon ampullatus) is listed as Endangered under Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Partial critical habitat was identified for this population in the Recovery Strategy first published in 2010 (Fisheries and Oceans Canada 2016), and three critical habitat areas were designated along the eastern Scotian Shelf, encompassing the Gully, Shortland Canyon, and Haldimand Canyon (shapefile available online: https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/db177a8c-5d7d-49eb-8290-31e6a45d786c). However, the Recovery Strategy recognized that additional areas may constitute critical habitat for the population and recommended further studies based on acoustic and visual monitoring to assess the importance of inter-canyon areas as foraging habitat and transit corridors for northern bottlenose whales. In a subsequent study of the distribution, movements, and habitat use of northern bottlenose whales on the eastern Scotian Shelf (Stanistreet et al.

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2022
Date Published: May 7, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

The Oceans Act (1997) commits Canada to maintaining biological diversity and productivity in the marine environment. A key component of this is to identify areas that are considered ecologically or biologically significant. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Science has developed guidance on the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs) (DFO 2004) and has endorsed the scientific criteria of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) for identifying ecologically or biologically significant marine areas as defined in Annex I of Decision IX/20 of its 9th Conference of Parties. These criteria were applied to the Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) Shelves Bioregion in two separate data-driven processes.

Last Updated: Feb. 1, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 1, 2019
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Environment, Oceans
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