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Found 10 records similar to Electricity - Western Canada Generating Stations, 1968

Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows, for Eastern Canada, locations of electrical generating stations, the installed generating capacity of rivers and thermal stations, installed capacity in kilowatts and whether the generating station is hydro-electric, conventional or nuclear. Service areas of major electric power suppliers as of 1968 are also denoted.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 14, 1972
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  electric power stations, electricity, energy technology, fuels, hydroelectric plants, hydropower
Federal

A generating station is an industrial facility built and operated to generate electricity. The map shows the 916 generating stations (power plants) operating in 2007. There were 479 hydroelectric stations, 375 thermal plants (combustion, internal combustion and steam), 7 nuclear plants, 54 wind turbines and 1 tidal power plant.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, electric power stations, map
Federal

A generating station is an industrial facility built and operated to generate electricity. The map shows the 916 generating stations (power plants) operating in 2007. There were 479 hydroelectric stations, 375 thermal plants (combustion, internal combustion and steam), 7 nuclear plants, 54 wind turbines and 1 tidal power plant.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, electric power stations, map
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the electrical generation and transmission network for Canada; other features are interconnections and electricity trade. The tables list interconnections and generating stations; other tables and graphs summarize electricity production and trade.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 15, 1987
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  electric power stations, electricity, energy technology, hydroelectric plants, hydropower
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the electrical generating network in Eastern Canada circa 1954. Generating plants are shown as either developed waterpower sites (in other words, hydro plants), or as fuel electric plants (thermal plants). The plants are portrayed on the basis of their capacity, measured in horsepower. The map also shows transmission lines of 60 000 volts or higher.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  electric power stations, electricity, energy technology, fuels, hydroelectric plants, hydropower
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the electrical generating network in Western Canada circa 1954. Generating plants are shown as either developed waterpower sites (in other words, hydro plants), or as fuel electric plants (thermal plants). The plants are portrayed on the basis of their capacity, measured in horsepower. The map also shows transmission lines of 60 000 volts or higher.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  electric power stations, electricity, energy technology, fuels, hydroelectric plants, hydropower
Federal

This map shows the five major ocean drainage areas in Canada: Hudson Bay, Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. An inset map shows the major dams with reservoir capacity larger than 1 billion cubic metres. Six of the 10 largest hydro-electric generating stations by capacity are located in the province of Quebec; whereas, the largest, Churchill Falls is in Newfoundland and Labrador. The other 3 are located in British Columbia.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2006
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF other
Keywords:  dams, geographical maps, watersheds
Federal

This map shows the 630 generating stations operated by utilities, with the stations being classed by their operating technology. The seven technologies shown represent water-power (hydro-electric and tidal), conventional thermal (internal combustion, combustion turbine, and steam), nuclear, and alternative fuels (wind energy).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, electric power stations, map
Federal

This map shows the 815 generating stations with a capacity of 500 kilowatts or greater classed by the principal fuel used. Two fuels are dominant: water power (hydro-electricity) and petroleum products. The pattern of hydro plants across Canada is partly explained by Canada's geology: areas that are either rugged or mountainous should have more good sites for these plants than do flat-lying areas. The geology map of Canada has been added here confirms this: it shows that the Canadian Shield (rugged) and Orogen areas (mountainous areas) do have many more hydro stations than do platforms (flat-lying areas).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, electric power stations, map
Federal

This map shows the 53 generating stations that were operated by companies of the mining or energy industries. The stations are often relatively large - the largest has a capacity of 912 000 kilowatts.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, electric power stations, map
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