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Found 10 records similar to Stream temperature - Torngat Mountains

Federal

Hydrology is a key factor affecting biodiversity and the ecological functioning of aquatic and riparian ecosystems through sediment transport, erosion, water chemistry, etc. Automated data loggers are being used to record year-round hourly measurments of absolute in-stream pressure, absolute barometric pressure and water level in headwater streams of the Ivitak focal watershed, in Torngat Mountains national park. Note that because the data loggers being used (Hobo U20) also records hourly water temperature readings this measure is co-located with a stream temperature measure.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream hydrology, automated data loggers, hydrologic parameters, Ivitak watershed, Labrador
Federal

Thousand Islands NP installs temperature data loggers to monitor hourly stream water temperatures at designated stream study sites from spring until fall.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2020
Date Published: Feb. 4, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hyperabundant Species, Herbivore, Deer, Browse, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

Stream thermal regime has important consequences for aquatic organisms, and is sensitive to climate and land use. The Park is monitoring thermal regimes at 10 sites annually from spring to fall using temperature loggers. The water temperature is recorded hourly and these data used to assess the suitability of the thermal environment of streams for Brook Trout.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream Thermal Regime, Salmonid temperature stress, Temperature Loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Terra Nova National Park employs fixed station pressure/temperature loggers to continuously monitor stream water temperatures over the entire summer at designated stream study sites.

Last Updated: Sep. 21, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  water temperature, pressure, data logger, fish physiological stress, Thermal Index, stream, Newfoundland
Federal

Hydrological patterns determine water depth, flow intensity, duration, and frequency of flooding, as well as low flow periods. Water levels in streams are not considered stable, but fluctuate seasonally. Hydrologic conditions primarily affect abiotic factors such as habitat structure, temperature and water chemistry, which in turn determine the biotic components (species composition, species richness, primary productivity) of the stream ecosystem. In PEI National Park, stream discharge (m3/sec) is predicted in four streams within PEI National Park using Onset HOBO U20 water level loggers and rating curves generated in four small 1 – 3rd order streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, hydrology, water level, flow intensity, Richards-Baker Index (RBI), stream flow index
Federal

Stream hydrology strongly affects habitat quality for most stream-dwelling species, and is affected by both climate and land use. This measure, which is colocated with stream temperature regime, reports on flow parameters in 10-12 park streams over time - using in-situ water level data loggers, as well as hydrometric stations.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hydrology, Stream Flow, Water Level, Environment Canada, data loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Since 2009, up to nine (9) streams (White River, Willow River, Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow River, Cascade River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek) are monitored with stream temperature HOBO loggers to assess thermal suitability for Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). In 2016 and 2017, a second logger was deployed at each of the streams. Loggers are deployed in each stream during the summer, between Lake Superior and the first barrier. Data from the two loggers are analyzed separately for each week and the lower maximum weekly trimean temperature from each stream is used.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, Pukaskwa, HOBO logger, streams, thermal
Federal

The hydrological regime of a stream plays a critical role in determining the biodiversity and ecological processes of aquatic, wetland and riparian ecosystems. As a result, hydrological characteristics provide important information on the integrity of freshwater systems and how they may be changing over time. The monitoring program assess and detect changes in a Streamflow Index of key hydrological measures in major transboundary watersheds at Kejimkujik. Stream water level is recorded hourly using in-situ water level data loggers.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Streams, hydrological regime, Nova Scotia
Federal

What? Stream temperatures on third order streams in Cape Breton Highlands National Park are being monitored to determine if mean water temperatures are changing over time. When? Monitoring frequency occurs annually from June 15th to September 15th on various park streams.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Aquatic Health, Freshwater, Temperature, Data Logger
Federal

Soil and air temperature control the composition and productivity of tundra plant communities and different species of Arctic and alpine plants respond differently to changing soil and air temperatures, which can lead to changes in community composition The Torngat National Park monitors soil and air temperature using temperature loggers deploys at several locations in the park. Air temperatures (degrees Celsius) are measured each hour using Onset ProV2 data loggers housed in a radiation shield anchored to a firm metal post 1.5 m above ground level. Soil temperature readings (degrees Celsius) have been collected using Onset Hobo Pendant or Hobo Tidbit data loggers buried at a depth of 10 cm and set to record temperatures every hour.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Tundra vegetation, climate, soil temperature, air temperature, temperature loggers, Ivitak focal watershed, Labrador
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