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Found 10 records similar to Forest Breeding Bird Abundance and Composition - Kluane

Federal

Parks Canada monitors vegetation composition in Kluane National Park and Reserve forests to determine resilience following a spruce bark beetle outbreak of unprecedented severity that occurred in the mid 1990’s. Understanding stand development after this landscape-level disturbance will be critical to assessing its effect on wildlife habitat and the impacts of beetle salvage logging outside of the park. Sampling is done every 5 years in 50 randomly located permanent sample plots in white spruce dominated mature forests. Three sub-measures are assessed: 1) Relative dominance of deciduous basal area, 2) percent cover of berry-bearing shrubs, and 3) ratio of willow clumps to tall spruce regeneration.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, forest plot, bark beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis
Federal

Parks Canada monitors structural change in the spruce forests of Kluane National Park and Reserve following a spruce bark beetle outbreak that began in 1994. Understanding stand development after this landscape-level disturbance will be critical for assessing the resilience of this forest to a disturbance of unprecedented severity. It is also important for monitoring the impact of the outbreak on wildlife habitat and the effects of beetle salvage logging outside of the park on forest development. Sampling is done every 5 years in 50 randomly located permanent sample plots in white spruce dominated mature forests.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, forest plot, bark beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis
Federal

Shrubs are projected to move upslope and expand into the alpine tundra with a warming climate in the Kluane region of Yukon. Shrub expansion will create habitat for some species, such as moose, but cause habitat loss for species such as hoary marmot, collared pika and ptarmigan. Parks Canada uses alpine vegetation plots to monitor shrub extent in Kluane. Two sub-measures are observed: 1) percent cover of shrubs and 2) height of tallest shrub.

Last Updated: Feb. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, climate change, shrub expansion, alpine tundra
Federal

Amphibians worldwide are facing declines and possible extinction. Wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) are the only amphibian in Kluane National Park and Reserve. They are considered an important component of wetlands and are highly valued by Southern Tutchone peoples. Threats to wood frogs in Kluane are primarily the loss of habitat due to climate change and infection by diseases such as chytrid fungus.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, wood frog, Lithobates sylvaticus, climate change, wetland, amphibian
Federal

Georgian Bay Islands National Park uses point counts to monitor forest birds on Beausoleil Island; this measure focuses on the abundance of five common songbird species and overall diversity.

Last Updated: Sep. 19, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest, Birds, Vireos, Warblers, Thrushes, Canadian Wildlife Service, Beausoleil Island, Georgian Bay, Ontario
Federal

The old-forest landbird monitoring program was initiated in 2014. Old-forest songbirds are a priority for monitoring because they can be vulnerable to habitat disturbance, and their habitats are less common overall and difficult to restore once disturbed. This augmented program employs a stratified sampling design of point count surveys to improve monitoring of rarer songbirds of conservation concern. These data will also be used to validate models that predict bird population changes in response to oil sands activity and to further refine bird monitoring design.

Last Updated: Jul. 25, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Oil sands, Migratory birds, Landbirds, Birds, Oil Sands, Forest, Boreal, Point Count, Species at Risk
Federal

Avian point counts are conducted annually by collecting and transcribing acoustic recordings. Recording stations are located along 11 transects, and are visited on mornings between late May and early July. Songs and calls for all identifiable species are documented. Migratory songbirds are an excellent indicator of forest ecosystem health because they are sensitive to environmental change, are widespread, and are easily surveyed.

Last Updated: Apr. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, forest, avian, boreal, bird, acoustic, point count
Federal

Shrubs are projected to move upslope and expand into the alpine tundra with a warming climate in the Kluane region of Yukon. Shrub expansion will create habitat for some species, such as moose, but cause habitat loss for species such as hoary marmot, collared pika and ptarmigan. Parks Canada monitors plant species richness using a similarity index, comparing repeat measurements with the landscape average measured in 2011. Field sampling is done on 21 permanent plots in seven different alpine tundra sites in late July/early August every 5 years

Last Updated: Sep. 17, 2019
Date Published: Sep. 17, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, alpine tundra, climate change, species richness, similarity index
Federal

Forest birds are diverse in Ontario, with many species being common or very common on the Bruce Peninsula (i.e., American Redstart, Black-throated Green Warbler, Pileated Woodpecker. etc.). The national park monitors breeding forest birds (mostly songbirds and woodpeckers) with pre-programmed automated recorders at 20 sites (four routes), split equally between deciduous and coniferous forests.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest birds, warblers, woodpeckers, vireos, breeding, automated recorders, deciduous, coniferous, Great Lakes
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s monitoring program for species at risk, rare and difficult-to-monitor species uses targeted sampling designs to assess the population status and trend of species that are not readily sampled by other programs. A formal analysis was used to prioritize landbird species for monitoring under this program. Old-forest songbirds were determined to be the highest priority for monitoring because they can be vulnerable to habitat disturbance, and their habitats are less common overall and difficult to restore once disturbed. An old-forest landbird monitoring program was initiated in 2014.

Last Updated: Nov. 5, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Nature and Biodiversity - Habitat, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Migratory birds, Oil sands
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