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Found 10 records similar to Pelican and Cormorant Abundance and Mortality - Prince Albert

Federal

Herring gull (Larus arentatus, HERG), great blue heron (Ardea Herodias GBHE), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus, DCCO) and ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis, RBGU) have been monitored in Pukaskwa National Park since 1977 as part of the colonial waterbird monitoring program. A complete count of active nests on islands found along the ~120km of coast of Pukaskwa is conducted based on the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) protocol. The nest count is carried out during the peak of breeding over a period of 2-3 weeks. From 1977 – 1981, surveys were conducted annually and used an island numbering system (Old Colony Number in datasheet).

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Colonial waterbirds, Pukaskwa, herring gull, Larus argentatus, great blue heron, Ardea Herodias, double-crested cormorant, Phalacrocorax auritus, ring-billed gull
Federal

These fish-eating colonial waterbirds breed and nest in colonies on islands in and around Fathom Five National Marine Park. Five species of colonial waterbird are monitored. These birds and their eggs are effective measures of environmental contamination and aquatic ecosystem health.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Colonial Waterbirds, environmental contamination, breeding, nesting, islands, aquatic ecosystem health, eggs, Herring Gull, Ring-billed Gull
Provincial

Distribution of cormorant habitat in coastal British Columbia showing relative abundance (RA) by season and overall relative importance (RI). RI is based on project region and not on the province as a whole. CRIMS is a legacy dataset of BC coastal resource data that was acquired in a systematic and synoptic manner from 1979 and was intermittently updated throughout the years. Resource information was collected in nine study areas using a peer-reviewed provincial Resource Information Standards Committee consisting of DFO Fishery Officers, First Nations, and other subject matter experts.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  Canada, Seabirds, biology, colony, cormorant, feeding, habitat, marine bird, ornithology
Provincial

The bedrock topography map of the Pelican River area (NTS 83P) shows the elevation of the bedrock surface. In general, the surface topography reflects the bedrock topography: bedrock highs underlie the Pelican, Amadou and May Hills highlands, and the buried valleys lie within the Wabasca and Wandering River plains. The elevation of the bedrock surface ranges from 360 metres above sea level (masl) in the Wabasca Plain to slightly more than 920 masl in the Pelican Mountains. Segments of three major buried valleys are present: the Wiau Valley and the Leismer Valley in the northeast, and the south to northwest-trending Amesbury Valley in the central portion of the area.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2004
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: SHP XML HTML
Keywords:  83p, alberta, bedrock topography, buried valleys, canada, drift thickness, geoscientificinformation, gis data, pelican river
Federal

Data Sources: Banque informatisée des oiseaux de mer au Québec (BIOMQ: ECCC-CWS Quebec Region) Atlantic Colonial Waterbird Database (ACWD: ECCC-CWS Atlantic Region).. Both the BIOMQ and ACWD contain records of individual colony counts, by species, for known colonies located in Eastern Canada. Although some colonies are censused annually, most are visited much less frequently. Methods used to derive colony population estimates vary markedly among colonies and among species.

Last Updated: Jun. 15, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 14, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: SHP WMS JSON HTML CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Eastern Canada; Atlantic Ocean, Bird Colonies; Seabirds, Nature and Biodiversity, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Environmental Stewardship Branch, Canadian Wildlife Service, Unclassified, Birds
Provincial

The drift thickness map of the Pelican River area (NTS 83P) shows the variation in thickness of unconsolidated sediment lying between the bedrock surface and the present-day land surface, and complements the regional drift thickness map of Alberta (Pawlowicz and Fenton, 1995). The thickness of the drift varies from less than 20 metres in uplands, such as the Pelican Mountains, to a little over 260 metres in the Wiau Valley in the northeast part of the map area. The thickest drift fills the paleovalleys containing the major valleys: the Wiau Valley and the Leismer Valley in the northeast, and the north-trending Amesbury Valley in the central portion of the area.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2004
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: SHP XML HTML
Keywords:  83p, alberta, bedrock topography, buried valleys, canada, drift thickness, geoscientificinformation, gis data, pelican river
Federal

Historically, Pukaskwa had two naturally occurring populations of Pitcher’s Thistle; Creek Beach and Crescent beach, both located in Oiseau Bay. On Sept. 22 & 23, 1985 there was a severe windstorm that severely affected the beach at Oiseau Bay and caused erosion at the colony site and then on June 26, 1986, there was a severe thunderstorm with heavy rain that caused the washout of a huge portion of the Crescent Beach colony. Both of the colonies have shown negative population trends to the point where the Crescent Beach colony is now considered extirpated. From 1982 to 2014, each location was divided into plots and within each plot, each plant was tagged with a unique identifier using dymo tape and a bicycle spoke.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pitcher’s Thistle, Cirsium Pitcheri, Pukaskwa, restoration, species at risk
Federal

This set of data contains the results of the various breeding seabird inventories conducted at Forillon National Park. Seabirds are recognized as good indicators of the quality of marine ecosystems and more particularly of the abundance of prey species on which they depend. Monitoring of seabird populations is therefore part of Forillon National Park's ecological integrity monitoring program. The abundance of different seabird species is determined by a total nest count in the cliffs during the nesting period.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  sea birds, inventory, Black-legged kittiwake, gull, Razorbill, Common murre, Black guillemot, Double-crested cormorant, nests
Federal

Areal Extent (hectares) of black-tailed prairie dog colonies in the Park monitored through colony perimeter mapping every 2 years. This is actively managed to increase prairie dog population through a combination of plague mitigation (i.e. dusting and sylvatic plague vaccine baits) and habitat enhancement/colony expansion (i.e. mowing edges, fire and grazing regimes) and upon feasibility and risk assessment, population expansion (i.e.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  black-tailed prairie dog, colony, area of occurence, species at risk, colony dynamics, Saskatchewan
Federal

The Grasslands National Park monitors the area of occurrence of the Black-Tailed Prairie Dog through measuring surface area in hectares of active colonies. Monitoring provides data on the expansion or contraction of black-tailed prairie dog colonies in the park. Active colony areas outside of the park and in the greater park ecosystem (southwest Saskatchewan) are also monitored, but this data is not included.

Last Updated: Dec. 5, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  black-tailed prairie dog, colony, area of occurence, species at risk, colony dynamics, Saskatchewan
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