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Found 10 records similar to Annual snowfall

Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps for the annual total precipitation. Annual precipitation is defined as the sum of rainfall and the assumed water equivalent of snowfall for a given year. A specific gravity of 0.1 for freshly fallen snow is used, which means that ten inches (25.4 cm) of freshly fallen snow is assumed to be equal to one inch (2.54 cm) of rain. The mean annual total precipitation and snowfall maps on this plate are primarily based on thirty-year data during the period 1921 to 1950 inclusive.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

The map shows isolines on four different dates: 1) the day of the year when there are less than or equal to 2.5 centimetres of snow that occurs and remain absent for 7 or more days; 2) the standard deviation of the mean date of snow cover loss; 3) the day of year when greater than or equal to 2.5 centimetres of snow occur and remain for more than 7 days; and 4) the standard deviation of the mean date of snow cover formation. The beginning and end of the winter season in Canada is usually identified with the formation and disappearance of snow cover in autumn and spring respectively. The duration of snow cover varies considerably from year to year in the southern fringes of the country and adjacent to the east and west coasts. However, even in northern continental areas early and late snowfalls which leave an ephemeral snow cover are common.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, precipitation, water balance
Federal

This dataset contains adjusted daily rainfall (R) and snowfall (S) data from all Canadian stations reporting rainfall and snowfall for which we have metadata to do the adjustments. The processing includes inspection and adjustment using quality control procedures customized for producing gridded datasets, including: (1) conversion of snowfalls to their water equivalents; (2) corrections for gauge undercatch and evaporation due to wind effect, for gauge specific wetting loss, and for trace precipitation amount (same as in Mekis and Vincent, 2011); (3) treatment of flags (e.g. accumulation flags). A total of 2146 stations were processed; their record lengths vary from 3 to167 years.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Apr. 14, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  rainfall, snowfall, climate change, Canada
Federal

This map shows the average maximum snow depth in centimetres computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). Over southern Canada this usually occurs in January or February, while the time of maximum accumulation occurs much later in mountain areas and in the Arctic. The main features of the map are the pronounced maximum in snow accumulation over the western Cordillera, where snow depths can exceed several metres, with a secondary maximum over Quebec and Labrador. These maxima are related to their proximity to oceans, which act as sources of moisture and winter storms, and to the orographic effect of the mountains in the case of western Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a plate with seven maps. The first map shows mean annual snowfall in Canada. Four additional maps show median snow depth for four separate months. The final two maps show snow cover and maximum snow depth.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1991
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

The map shows the mean maximum depth of snow in centimetres, the standard deviation of the mean maximum depth of snow, and the mean date of mean maximum depth of snow. The information shown on the map is compiled from 1961 – 1970 snow course data in conjunction with 1955 – 1972 snow depth data. An appreciation of the quantity of snow in storage within a drainage basin during late winter is critical to spring flood forecasting. As well, decisions regarding overland transport and wildlife control can be rationally taken.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, precipitation, water balance
Federal

Over southern Canada maximum snow depth usually occurs in January or February, while the time of maximum accumulation occurs much later in mountain areas and in the Arctic. The main features of the map are the pronounced maximum in snow accumulation over the western Cordillera (British Columbia and Yukon), where snow depths can exceed several metres, with a secondary maximum over Quebec and Labrador. These maxima are related to their proximity to oceans, which acts as sources of moisture and winter storms, and to the orographic effect of the mountains in the case of western Canada. The two maxima are linked by a band of higher snow accumulation that follows the boreal forest zone; this is a preferred track for winter storms.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2006
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF other
Keywords:  geographical maps, snow
Federal

The Duck Lake (Saskatchewan) Geolysimeter precipitation intercomparison data are from a co-located precipitation gauge and deep groundwater observation well. The data published here are event based intercomparisons, collected between 2010 and 2016, binned into rain and snow events. Snowfall data observed by the precipitation gauge have been adjusted for wind bias using the SPICE (Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment) transfer functions (Kochendorfer et al., 2017a) and included for intercomparison. The data is described by Smith et al.

Last Updated: Jul. 31, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 24, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: XLSX HTML DOC
Keywords:  Precipitation, Geolysimeter, Intercomparison
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 30, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, snow
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, snow
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