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Found 10 records similar to Bat NATBat Ultrasound - Jasper

Federal

Bat monitoring in Jasper National Park supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Survey efforts are increasingly important on account of the recent detection of white-nosed syndrome in western North America and evidence that the disease is spreading more readily. Data collected from hibernacula and maternity roost monitoring help determine species composition and relative abundance to inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, bats, hibernacula, maternity roost, Chiroptera
Federal

Aquatic fish data are collected across watercourses in Jasper National Park using a variety of fish sampling methods in order to inventory fish diversity, distribution, and relative densities over time. Data collected provide resource management some of the necessary information needed to prepare stock-specific plans to conserve, manage, and where appropriate restore native fish and their habitats in Jasper National Park.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Parc, freshwater fish species, fish sampling, fish monitoring
Federal

Both native and non-native fish inhabit many lakes and ponds across Jasper National Park. Prior to stocking practices in the past, many lakes in Jasper National Park did not have fish or had a low diversity fish assemblage. These past stocking practices have altered fish communities today. Introduced non-native fish may outcompete some native fish populations and the stocking of historical natural fishless lakes may affect their food webs.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Parc, native species, invasive species, introduced species, freshwater fish, occurrence
Federal

Amphibians around the world are in decline and this has led to many international initiatives to monitor and catalog amphibian biodiversity.
The western toad (Bufo boreas) found in Jasper National Park is a species of special concern protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Jasper National Park conducts auditory and visual amphibian surveys to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling of amphibians in the Park, using presence/absence data, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses and helps inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, amphibians, frog, toad, salamander, western toad, Bufo boreas
Federal

Jasper National Park uses a reference condition approach to monitor benthic macroinvertebrates in the stream and river ecosystems within the park. The taxonomic counts of the benthic macroinvertebrates from test sites are compared to that of the reference sites.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, benthic macroinvertebrates, stream, river, freshwater ecosystem
Federal

Motion-detection cameras are a cost-effective and non-invasive tool used in Jasper National Park for sampling mammal populations and estimating species occurrence. Occupancy modelling, which uses detection/non-detection data from cameras, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses. Data are collected throughout the year across Jasper National Park to determine change in the distribution of key animal populations as well as supporting demographic predictions to better inform management.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, motion-detection cameras, camera trap, mammal population, species
Federal

Contained within the National Parks, 1961 to 1994, Atlas of Canada series, is a map that shows Jasper National Park. This bilingual map shows the topography of the park in great detail: it has contour lines (with a 500 foot interval), and it names a large number of mountains, giving their elevations in feet. The drainage within the park is also shown in detail, as are the glaciers in and around the park. Shaded relief is used on the map.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1974
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  maps, national parks, recreational facilities
Federal

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) restoration supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Whitebark Pine is an Endangered Species protected under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and it has an important role as a keystone species across mountain landscapes. Seeds were collected from whitebark pines identified as being putatively resistant to blister rust and were germinated in nurseries for subsequent planting. Permanent transect plots for resistant seedlings and circular plots for resistant seeds were established to monitor survival after planting.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Mount Robson Provincial Park, whitebark pine, blister rust, reforestation, restoration, Whitebark pine, inus albicaulis)
Federal

Elk (Cervus canadensis) are generally considered a keystone species across a variety of landscapes. Elk (C. canandenis nelsoni) in Jasper National Park is one of four extant subspecies of elk occurring in North America. They are an important wildlife component in the Park regarding the management of human-wildlife conflict and understanding caribou/wolf population dynamics. Data are collected every year by roadside surveys across the Park to help estimate recruitment.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Elk, Cervus canadensis nelsoni, roadside survey, recruitment
Federal

Forest fires can provide positive effects on forest ecosystems, such as controlling the spread of detrimental insects, maintaining diverse habitats, and the recycling of nutrients across landscapes. Fire management in Jasper National Park aims to maintain these natural processes, and includes controlled burns to also reduce the risk of future wildfires that may threaten the Park and community assets. Data is collected using satellite imagery and provide some of the necessary information needed to prepare park-specific plans for conservation and recovery activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park
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