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Found 10 records similar to Water Temperature - Prince Edward Island

Federal

Stream thermal regime has important consequences for aquatic organisms, and is sensitive to climate and land use. The Park is monitoring thermal regimes at 10 sites annually from spring to fall using temperature loggers. The water temperature is recorded hourly and these data used to assess the suitability of the thermal environment of streams for Brook Trout.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream Thermal Regime, Salmonid temperature stress, Temperature Loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Stream temperature increases due to climate change, land clearing, beaver activity, etc... can be stressful for resident fishes and other aquatic species. Bruce Peninsula National Park monitors three creeks for thermal stress; particular emphasis is on Brook Trout habitat suitability.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Average daily temperature °C, Maximum temperature recorded daily °C, Minimum temperature recorded daily °C, Type of Data
Federal

Since 2009, up to nine (9) streams (White River, Willow River, Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow River, Cascade River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek) are monitored with stream temperature HOBO loggers to assess thermal suitability for Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). In 2016 and 2017, a second logger was deployed at each of the streams. Loggers are deployed in each stream during the summer, between Lake Superior and the first barrier. Data from the two loggers are analyzed separately for each week and the lower maximum weekly trimean temperature from each stream is used.

Last Updated: Jul. 10, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, Pukaskwa, HOBO logger, streams, thermal
Federal

This dataset contains temperature data taken from 11 streams or rivers in Forillon National Park since 2008. Temperature data are collected hourly by a HOBO probe installed on the watercourse’s bottom in June and removed in September or October. For each watercourse studied, the temperature probe is installed at the benthic invertebrate community sampling site (CABIN) close to the site at which the electrofishing is carried out. Temperature data are particularly useful for assessing the quality of brook trout aquatic ecosystems in Forillon National Park.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  temperature, water, streams
Federal

This dataset covers electrofishing efforts in 11 streams or rivers in Forillon National Park since 2008. The abundance, size structure and condition of the fish in a brook trout population are sensitive to changes in the environment, specifically those caused by the presence of an invasive alien species, pollution or climate change, making this measure a good indicator of the health of the aquatic ecosystem. Fish, mainly brook trout, are harvested using electrofishing equipment in a closed 100-square-metre stretch of stream. Three fishing sessions, or passages, are carried out.

Last Updated: Nov. 8, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  electric fishing, streams, brook trout, lengh, weight
Federal

Freshwater ponds are monitored annually for fish species diversity and American eel abundance (catch per unit effort, or CUE), and American eel total length. Hoop traps and gee-type minnow traps are used to sample fish communities in four ponds within PEI National Park. Each pond is sampled over a three day period with a fishing effort of 3 trap nights in 9 different trap sectors of a pond. Species abundance is recorded for each net.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, freshwater, fish, biodiversity, community, pond, abundance, American eel, Anguilla rostrata
Federal

Brook trout are top predators in aquatic ecosystems at Kejimkujik that integrate the effects of stressors throughout the aquatic trophic structure. They are sensitive to a variety of stressors, including acidification, changes in water quality, climate change, fishing pressure, exotic species introductions, trophic structure alterations, land use change, and watershed fragmentation. The monitoring program tracks Brook trout population status, as assessed by relative abundance and trout condition at two watersheds in Kejimkujik. Volunteer anglers record morphometric and catch per unit effort data during the months of April, May and June for 3 years in a row every 5 years.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Brook trout, Stressors, Population status, Nova Scotia
Federal

The effects of climate warming, eutrophication, air pollutant inputs and forestry activity that occurred before La Mauricie National Park was created influenced and continue to influence today water quality in the park. These stress factors threaten the natural evolution of aquatic ecosystems. On several small lakes, the quality of the habitat has not ensured the maintenance of the eastern brook trout population and has decreased the beaver population. In order to monitor the aquatic ecosystems, sampling of a number of predetermined lakes is being carried out and water quality is being measured by evaluating parameters related to acidification, eutrophication, general water quality, and oxygen and temperature conditions.

Last Updated: Sep. 17, 2019
Date Published: Sep. 17, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Water Quality, Sampling, Lakes, Acidification, Eutrophication, Dissolved Oxygen Level, pH, Temperature, Optimal Zone
Federal

This dataset covers the monitoring of benthic invertebrate communities in 11 streams or rivers in Forillon National Park since 2007. The sampling methods and techniques used for this monitoring are based on those of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) established by Environment Canada. This follow-up is usually done in early fall. The collection site is located near the brook trout community and water temperature monitoring site for each of the watercourses studied.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  CABIN, benthic invertebrates, streams, EPT taxa, FBI biotic index
Federal

Atlantic salmon are an ecologically and culturally important species in healthy aquatic systems of western Newfoundland. This measure determines the status and trend, over a 10 year period, of Atlantic salmon returning to spawn in three rivers in Gros Morne - Western Brook, Trout River and Deer Arm Brook. Secondarily, it will detect invasive anadromous species. A salmonid counting fence is rotated through the 3 rivers.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Atlantic salmon, Western Brook, Deer Arm Brook, Trout River, Fish Fence, non-native anadromous fish, Newfoundland
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