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Found 10 records similar to Health Canada’s Proposal to Add Maximum Levels for Inorganic Arsenic in Polished (White) and Husked (Brown) Rice to the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Foods

Federal

Therefore, Health Canada added two new maximum levels for inorganic arsenic in polished (white) and husked (brown) rice, respectively, to Part 2 of the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Foods, effective June 5, 2020, as described in the information document.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Jun. 3, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Notice of Modification, part 2, contaminants, adulterating substances, maximum levels, chemical contaminants, add a maximum level, inorganic arsenic, rice-based foods
Federal

Food contaminants and other adulterating substances are chemicals that may be present in foods at levels that could impact the overall safety and/or quality of foods. These substances can either be inadvertently present in foods or, in some cases, intentionally added for fraudulent purposes. Establishing a prohibition or maximum level (ML) is a form of risk management that may be employed to reduce exposure to a particular chemical contaminant in foods.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Apr. 6, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum levels, chemical contaminants, add a maximum, inorganic arsenic, rice-based foods, infants, young children, food contaminants, adulterating substances
Federal

Food contaminants and other adulterating substances are chemicals that may be present in foods at levels that could impact the overall safety and/or quality of foods. These substances can either be inadvertently or naturally present in foods or in some cases intentionally added for fraudulent purposes. Establishing a prohibition or a maximum level (ML) are forms of risk management that may be employed to eliminate or reduce exposure to a particular chemical contaminant in foods.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 19, 2018
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum levels, chemical contaminants, inorganic arsenic, rice-based foods, infants, young children, food contaminants, adulterating substances, quality of foods
Federal

foods. These substances can either be inadvertently or naturally present in foods or, in some cases, intentionally added for fraudulent purposes. Establishing a prohibition or a maximum level (ML) is a form of risk management that may be employed to eliminate or reduce exposure to a particular chemical contaminant in foods.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Jun. 4, 2019
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum levels, chemical contaminants, adulterating substances, quality of foods, infant formula, levels of lead
Federal

Food contaminants and other adulterating substances are chemicals that may be present in foods at levels that could impact the overall safety and/or quality of foods. These substances can either be inadvertently or naturally present in foods or, in some cases, intentionally added for fraudulent purposes. Establishing a prohibition or a maximum level (ML) is a form of risk management that may be employed to eliminate or reduce exposure to a particular chemical contaminant in foods.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Apr. 6, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum levels, chemical contaminants, adulterating substances, quality of foods, arsenic in fruit-juice, fruit nectar
Federal

The List of Maximum Levels for Various Chemical Contaminants in Foods specifies an ML of 50 parts per billion (p.p.b.) (expressed in the list as 50 µg/kg or micrograms per kilogram) for patulin in apple juice, including the apple juice portion of any juice blends or drinks, and unfermented apple cider.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 2, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum level, patulin in apple-juice, unfermented apple cider, contaminants in foods, adulterating substances, ML of 50 parts per billion
Federal

The List of Maximum Levels for Various Chemical Contaminants in Foods specifies an ML of 200 parts per million (ppm) total glycoalkaloids in potato tubers (fresh weight), with total glycoalkaloids specified as being the sum of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine. These two glycoalkaloids are estimated to comprise approximately 95% of the total glycoalkaloid (TGA) content of potatoes.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 2, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum level, glycoalkaloids in potato-tubers, TGA, contaminants in foods, adulterating substances, ML of 200 parts per million
Federal

The List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Foods specifies an ML of 0.2 parts per million (p.p.m.) for lead in fruit juice, fruit nectar, beverages when ready-to-serve, and water in sealed containers (commonly referred to as bottled or prepackaged water) other than mineral or spring water.

Last Updated: Oct. 19, 2021
Date Published: May 18, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum lead levels, fruit juice, fruit nectar, water in containers, sealed containers, contaminants in foods, adulterating substances, ML of 0.2 parts per million
Federal

Therefore, Health Canada lowered the maximum levels for lead in infant formula, effective July 3, 2020, by modifying Part 2 of the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Foods as described in the information document.

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: Jun. 29, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum lead levels, lead, infant formula, concentrated infant formula, chemical contaminants, adulterating substances, quality of foods
Federal

Setting Maximum Levels for Contaminants in Foods

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  maximum levels, chemical contaminants, contaminants in foods, risk to health, exposure, food-borne contaminants
Date modified: