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Found 10 records similar to Coastal_Tern_Mingan_Number of nest_Data

Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the common eider. Field data between 1988 to 2015. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the common eider for nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common eider, Somateria mollissima dresseri, abondance, nest, egg, forest, ecological integrity
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the Great black-backed and European herring gulls . Field data from 1996 to 2015. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the Great black-backed and European herring gulls for nesting. The presence of this species is characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Great black-backed gull, European herring gull, abondance, nest, egg, ecological integrity, tundra
Federal

Field data from the monitoring of the common eider. The number of eggs and nests of the common eider were surveyed between 1988 and 2005. Many islands of the MANPRC are used by the common eider for nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common eider, Somateria mollissima dresseri, abundance, nest, egg, Saint Lawrence River, forest, ecological integrity
Federal

Terra Nova National Park censuses tern nests on 23 small islands in Newman Sound, to monitor species productivity and population dynamics.

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common Tern, Arctic Tern, colony, census, population dynamics, Newman Sound, Newfoundland
Federal

The second largest concentration of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in North America is found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These seabirds are indicators for the condition of coastal, marine, as well as estuarine ecosystems due to the use of these nesting and/or breeding grounds, and their reliance on the distribution of small fish populations in lagoons or along the outer beaches of barrier islands throughout the breeding season. The purpose of the common tern colony monitoring program is to determine the annual total number of nests and estimate mean clutch size in order to evaluate long-term breeding population health. The methods for this measure involve an annual systematic census on Tern Islands over a 1-2 day period in mid-to late June during the late incubation stage.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2020
Date Published: Jun. 8, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  common tern, Sterna hirundo, seabird, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding colonies, indicator species, coastal ecosystems, marine ecosystems
Federal

The coastal ecosystem is an indicator of the ecological integrity of the MANPRC. In total, 31 rare plant species are found in the coastal ecosystem of the MANCPR. Rare plants have been selected as a measure of the coastal ecosystem indicator. The objectives of the monitoring program are to detect changes over time in 1) the number of colonies of rare plants and 2) the abundance of focal species.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Rare plants, Cirsium scariosum, Meadow thistle, Taraxacum laurentianum, Gulf of St. Lawrence dandelion, Pedicularis palustris, marsh lousewort, Erigeron lonchophyllus, short-ray fleabane
Federal

The Grasslands National Park monitors the nesting attempts and productivity of burrowing owls by measuring the number of nests, number of owlets, and occupancy rate.

Last Updated: Apr. 9, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  burrowing owl, species at risk, prairie dog colonies, nesting, productivity, brood counts, Saskatchewan
Federal

Red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) are colonial birds found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These piscivorous sea ducks are indicators for the state of the breeding islands and associated marine or estuarine ecosystems, since nest distribution and productivity is closely related to habitat conditions such as the presence of marram grass (Ammophila breviligulata) in addition to sometimes sea lyme grass (Leymus mollis) or common yarrow (Achillea millefolium); while the occurrence of the species is also linked to the scope and abundance of fish resources. The purpose of the red-breasted merganser monitoring program is to determine the annual number of nesting attempts and to measure nest success, as these are important parameters that contribute to breeding population dynamics. The methods for this measure involve an annual census in mid-August where nests (i.e., a bowl with at least one egg) are located by systematically searching the vegetated regions on Tern Islands immediately following the completion of the breeding season.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  red-breasted merganser, Mergus serrator, colonial birds, piscivorous, sea duck, indicator species, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding success
Federal

This program assesses demographic parameters and breeding abundance of 5 species of ground (burrow) nesting seabirds: Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) at the Seabird Rocks Colony through population counts and capture-mark-recapture techniques. Counts of individuals at the colony are done 3-4 times throughout a breeding season (May-July) to estimate the size of the breeding populations. A banding (capture-mark-recapture) program to estimate annual survivorship of the two storm-petrel species is done via mist-net arrays on two consecutive nights in early May and/or mid-to-late July. This project seeks to track the present status of the ground and burrrow-nesting seabirds on Seabird Rocks and any recovery that may occur due to future habitat restoration and/or predator-control measures.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Nesting seabirds, Breeding abundance, Annual survivorship, Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata)
Federal

This program is used to track Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) population trend, local abundance, and annual survivorship. Bird banding, re-sighting visits and nesting population counts occur annually in the spring, with banding occurring in May to July since 2007, and nesting population counts occurring in late May or early June since 2008. The measurement for this species represents a complete annual census of birds nesting at key nesting locations across the park and is standardized across the three National Parks in the Coastal British Columbia bioregion with links to monitoring programs taking place in Alaska and Washington State. Completely dependent on marine shorelines for its food and nesting, these monogamous and long-lived birds establish well-defined breeding pairs and occupy composite feeding and nesting territories year after year, often along low-sloping gravel or rocky shorelines where intertidal prey are abundant.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), Population trend, Annual survivorship, Abundance, Rocky intertidal habitat
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