Open Government Portal

Found 10 records similar to Ecosystem Sites, Speciated Mercury, Validated Data, Oil Sands Region

Federal

Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury on PM2.5 (referred to as PBM) are currently collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at a Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Station (AMS). Preliminary, three-hour averaged speciated mercury data from the oil sands region are available for WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, Alberta. There are no Environment and Climate Change Canada or Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) air quality guidelines, nor Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives for speciated Hg measurements. The monitoring follows the established Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) standard operating procedures.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 20, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, speciated atmospheric mercury, particle composition, particulate matter, PM composition, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, fine particulate matter
Federal

Ambient concentrations of speciated mercury (Hg) have been measured at many locations across Canada. Mercury in the atmosphere is measured in three operationally-defined forms - gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), and particulate-bound mercury (PBM). Under most conditions, GEM (or Hg0) is the predominant species in the air (~95-99%), while RGM and PBM concentrations are typically two orders of magnitude lower, i.e., <5% of the total atmospheric mercury concentration. Reactive gaseous mercury is thought to consist of compounds such as HgCl2, HgBr2, Hg(OH)2 although the exact composition is unknown.

Last Updated: Mar. 22, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2002
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Air, Air Quality, Atmospheric Monitoring, NAtChem, Atmospheric Gases and Particles, Networks and Studies, SMM, Speciated Mercury, Hg
Federal

Ambient concentrations of speciated mercury (Hg) have been measured at many locations across Canada. Mercury in the atmosphere is measured in three operationally-defined forms - gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), and particulate-bound mercury (PBM). Under most conditions, GEM (or Hg0) is the predominant species in the air (~95-99%), while RGM and PBM concentrations are typically two orders of magnitude lower, i.e., <5% of the total atmospheric mercury concentration (Schroeder and Munthe, 1998). Reactive gaseous mercury is thought to consist of compounds such as HgCl2, HgBr2, Hg(OH)2 (Lin and Pehkonen, 1999), although the exact composition is unknown.

Last Updated: Dec. 11, 2019
Date Published: Aug. 10, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML CSV
Keywords:  Air, Air Quality, Atmospheric Monitoring, NAtChem, Networks and Studies, Speciated Mercury Monitoring, SMM, Hg
Federal

This dataset contains 2005 concentrations of total mercury (THg), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), methylated mercury, dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in the water column of the Canadian Arctic. Mercury in the Arctic is an important environmental and human health issue. The reliance of Northern peoples on traditional foods, such as marine mammals, for subsistence means that they are particularly at risk from mercury exposure. Mercury concentrations on biological organisms have increased since the onset of the industrial age and are controlled by a combination of abiotic factors, food web dynamics and structure, as well as animal behavior.

Last Updated: Nov. 1, 2018
Date Published: Aug. 28, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Arctic, Northwest Passage, North Open Polynya, Hudson Strait, Hudson Bay, Mercury, Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), Contaminants, Marine Food Web
Federal

Total gaseous mercury (TGM) data are collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at two Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations (AMS). The instrument at WBEA AMS 11 was relocated to WBEA AMS 13 in Spring 2014. TGM data from the oil sands region are available for: WBEA AMS 6 - Patricia McInnes, located in Fort McMurray, Alberta, starting in October 2010; WBEA AMS 11 – Lower Camp, located approximately 30km north of Fort McMurray, for the period December 2012 to March 2014; WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, starting in June 2014. The TGM concentrations reported are comparable to those measured at sites across Canada (Cole et al., Atmosphere 2014, 5(3), 635-668).

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Feb. 9, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Oil sands, Air quality, Ambient air, total gaseous mercury, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, trace gases, Fort McKay
Federal

Total gaseous mercury (TGM) data are currently collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at two Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations (AMS). Preliminary, hourly averaged TGM data from the oil sands region are available for: WBEA AMS 6 - Patricia McInnes, located in Fort McMurray, Alberta, and WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, Alberta. There are no Environment and Climate Change Canada or Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) air quality guidelines, nor Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives, for TGM. The monitoring follows the established Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) standard operating procedures.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 20, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, total gaseous mercury, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, trace gases, Fort McKay, Fort McMurray, Oil sands
Federal

We set out to examine possible links between climate warming and increases in mercury concentrations ([Hg]) in landlocked Arctic char (S. alpinus) in the High Arctic. Mercury concentrations vary regionally and have remained constant or increased slightly in landlocked char in lakes on Ellesmere Island and Cornwallis Island over a 12-16 year period. This, despite declining industrial mercury emissions in North America. Therefore, we hypothesized that climate warming might increase the input of mercury from catchments through permafrost melt, leading to greater associated body burden of adult char.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2019
Date Published: Apr. 28, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), Arctic Char, Fishes, Mercury, Contaminants, Char Lake, Cornwallis Island, Ellesmere Island, Kent Peninsula
Federal

Recent and historical deposition of mercury (Hg) are examined over a broad geographic area from southwestern Northwest Territories to Labrador and from the U.S. Northeast to northern Ellesmere Island using dated sediment cores from 50 lakes (18 in midlatitudes (41-50 degrees North), 14 subarctic (51-64 degrees North) and 18 in the Arctic (65-83 degrees North)). Objectives were to quantify latitudinal and longitudinal trends of anthropogenic mercury deposition in eastern and northern North America, to investigate variations in mercury deposition, to examine relationships with lake area, catchment/lake area ratio and sedimentation rates, and to compare results with model predictions. Distinct increases of mercury over time were observed in 76% of Arctic, 86% of subarctic and 100% of midlatitude cores. Subsurface maxima in mercury depositional fluxes were observed in only 28% of midlatitude lakes and 18% of arctic lakes, indicating little recent reduction of inputs.

Last Updated: Oct. 12, 2018
Date Published: Apr. 30, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), Mercury, Contaminants, Sediment cores, Northern Ecosystem Initiative (NEI), Toxic Substances Research Initiative (TSRI), Arctic lakes, Subarctic lakes, Mid-latitude lakes
Federal

OFFSHORE EXPLORATORY WELL MOBIL MERCURY K-76

Last Updated: Jan. 25, 2017
Date Published: Nov. 20, 1986
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  geogratis, geospatial
Federal

At all locations the TGM measurements were made using automatic Tekran ® 2537 mercury vapour analyzers (described in detail in Poissant, 1997). The air is typically sampled at flow rates between 1.0 and 1.5 L/min (depending on location) and is passed through a Teflon filter (47 mm diameter; 0.45 µm) at the sample line inlet to remove particulate matter. Inside the analyzer, the mercury in the sample air is pre-concentrated before analysis by amalgamation on gold cartridges (5-30 minute concentration time). Mercury is removed from the gold cartridges by thermal desorption and is detected using Cold Vapour Atomic Fluorescence Spectrophotometry (CVAFS).

Last Updated: Mar. 22, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 6, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV
Keywords:  Air, Air Quality, Atmospheric Monitoring, NAtChem, Networks and Studies, CAPMoN, Pacific and Northern Region, PNR, AtmosphericGases
Date modified: