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Found 10 records similar to Natural Disturbance Type Map

Provincial

The Ecological Land Classification (ELC version 2015) for Nova Scotia provides a hierarchical mapping of the province's forest ecosystems into ecosections, ecodistricts and ecoregions. It includes interpretation of the dominant natural disturbance regimes and potential climax forests at the ecosection level.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Government of Nova Scotia
Formats: SHP XML KML GEOJSON other HTML CSV KMZ RSS
Keywords:  ecosystem, ecosection, ecodistrict, ecoregion, land classification, land use, forest, forest management, Government information
Provincial

The Ecological Land Classification (ELC) for Nova Scotia provides a hierarchical mapping of the province's forest ecosystems into ecosections, ecodistricts and ecoregions. It includes interpretation of the dominant natural disturbance regimes and potential climax forests at the ecosection level.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Nov. 1, 2016
Organization: Government of Nova Scotia
Formats: SHP XML KML GEOJSON other HTML CSV KMZ RSS
Keywords:  ecosystem, ecosection, ecodistrict, ecoregion, land classification, land use, forest, forest management, Government information
Federal

The generation of geospatial thematic information for managing and monitoring Canada's boreal ecosystem is essential for researchers, land managers, and policy makers. Canada's boreal region is a vast mosaic of forests, wetlands, rivers and lakes, but anthropogenic disturbances have impacted these ecosystems resulting in habitat loss, fragmentation and threats to biodiversity. Across Canada various geospatial datasets representing anthropogenic disturbance exist for timber harvesting, hydro-electric activity, settlement and oil & gas activities; however, these products often vary in scale, attributes, time period, and mapping technique. Driven by the need for national data as part of the 2011 boreal caribou science assessment, a standardized methodology was developed and implemented to create a single geospatial dataset representing anthropogenic disturbances across a significant portion of Canada's boreal ecosystem.

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: May 18, 2012
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  anthropogenic disturbance, boreal, forest, habitat, landcover, landuse
Federal

The removal and restoration of outdated infrastructure has been an ongoing since 2009, with formal tracking and monitoring for forest and coastal ecosystems starting in 2014. The natural function of an ecosystem is highly degraded by above and below ground infrastructure. A five step scale was developed to rate the level of disturbance of a site from its natural state, with one (1) having no ecosystem function or extremely little ecological value (i.e. a built road or building) and zero (0) being a fully restored and self-sustaining ecosystem.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, forest, infrastructure, footprint, condition
Federal

The generation of geospatial thematic information for managing and monitoring Canada's boreal ecosystem is essential for researchers, land managers, and policy makers. Canada's boreal region is a vast mosaic of forests, wetlands, rivers and lakes, but anthropogenic disturbances have impacted these ecosystems resulting in habitat loss, fragmentation and threats to biodiversity. Across Canada various geospatial datasets representing anthropogenic disturbance exist for timber harvesting, hydro-electric activity, settlement and oil & gas activities; however, these products often vary in scale, attributes, time period, and mapping technique. Driven by the need for national data as part of the 2011 boreal caribou science assessment, a standardized methodology was developed and implemented to create a single geospatial dataset representing anthropogenic disturbances across a significant portion of Canada's boreal ecosystem.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 10, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  disturbance, boreal, forest, caribou, habitat, mapping, landcover, landuse
Federal

As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou (Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation), Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping, across known caribou ranges, as of 2015. This data comprises a 5-year update to the mapping of 2008-2010 disturbances, and allows researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The original disturbance mapping was based on 30-metre resolution Landsat-5 imagery from 2008 -2010. The mapping process used in 2010 was repeated using 2015 Landsat imagery to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 15, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: XML WMS DOC HTML PDF TXT ESRI REST
Keywords:  anthropogenic disturbance; boreal; forest; caribou; habitat; mapping; landcover; landuse, Nature and Biodiversity, National (CA), Protect Species Well-Being, Develop Species Recovery / Management / Conservation Plans, Science and Technology Branch, Wildlife and Landscape Science, Unclassified, Ecosystems
Federal

As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation , Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping across known caribou ranges. This data allowed researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The mapping process was established to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology. The methods developed were focused on mapping disturbances at a specific point of time, and were not designed to identify the age of disturbances, which can be of particular interest for disturbances that can be considered non-permanent, for example cutblocks.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  anthropogeneic disturbance, boreal, forest, caribou, habitat, mapping, landcover, landuse
Federal

At the establishment of Kouchibouguac National Park in 1969, remnants of past human history and intervention activities such as agriculture and wood harvesting since the mid-1880s have significantly influenced the Park’s current landscape. To this day, human-caused disturbance continues through visitor use, construction of trails, campgrounds and facilities, as well as maintenance work such as the mowing of roadsides. As expected, this long history of anthropogenic disturbances has greatly increased the prevalence of exotic vegetation species on the landscape. The invasion of natural ecosystems by these invasive plants is considered one of the biggest threats to the biodiversity and ecological integrity of these systems.

Last Updated: Jul. 3, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  exotic, invasive, alien, plant species, vascular flora, vegetation, Invasive Plant Index, IPI, landscape
Provincial

This is a linear disturbance dataset for the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills region of Alberta. This dataset was created to support spatial analyses of linear disturbances in the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills region for the Alberta Environment and Parks report entitled 'Linear Disturbances in the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills of Alberta: Review of Potential Ecological Responses' which can be found at https://open.alberta.ca/publications/9781460140338. All linear disturbances are grouped into five categories using attribution from input data sources. These include: paved roads.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  -ACCESS, -LINEAR-DISTURBANCE, -LIVINGSTONE-PUBLIC-LAND-USE-ZONE, -PORCUPINE-HILLS-PUBLIC-LAND-USE-ZONE, -ROADS, -TRAILS, DOWNLOADABLE-DATA, ENVIRONMENT, LIVINGSTONE-PORCUPINE-HILLS-REGION
Federal

The park assesses expected ranges for each land cover type: successional stages by stand type, area regenerating after natural disturbance (e.g., fire), mature forest, non-forest, wetlands, and waterbodies.

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Landcover type, natural disturbance, succession, forest, Newfoundland
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