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Found 10 records similar to Canadian Total Diet Study - Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOC) 2015

Federal

A residential indoor air quality study was conducted by Health Canada in 2014, in collaboration with the National Research Council Canada, in Ottawa, Ontario. A range of air parameters typically found in and around residences and their attached garages was measured for four 48-hour periods over two weeks during the winter. Among the different pollutants measured, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using Summa™ canisters. The sample canisters were analyzed for 193 polar and non-polar VOCs.

Last Updated: Dec. 20, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 20, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Indoor Air Quality, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), Attached Garages
Federal

Mercury is a naturally occurring element that is also present in the environment as a result of human activities. Water bodies can be contaminated with mercury from industrial sources, such as pulp and paper mills, and from the soil when large reservoirs are created by hydro-electric dams. Methyl mercury is considered the most toxic form of mercury to human health and is formed when bacteria interact with mercury present in water and plants. Methyl mercury accumulates up the food chain, and predatory fish generally represent the main source of exposure from the diet.

Last Updated: Jan. 18, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 4, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Total, Diet, Foods, Composites, Mercury, Hg, market basket survey, TDS, Total Diet Study
Federal

A cross-over study was conducted among 42 healthy adults during summer 2010 in Ottawa, Canada. Participants cycled for 1-hour along high and low-traffic routes and volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures were determined along each route.

Last Updated: Feb. 10, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 9, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV XLS TXT
Keywords:  Volatile organic compound, Air Quality, Bike, Cycling, VOC, Ottawa
Federal

As part of a residential indoor air quality study, Health Canada and Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region collected 24-hour and 5-day indoor and outdoor exposure samples for 194 polar and non-polar volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For the Regina Indoor Air Quality Study, a total of 146 homes in Regina, Saskatchewan participated in one or both of two 10-week sampling sessions in the winter and summer of 2007.

This data presents summary 24-hour and 5-day VOC statistics obtained from the study and is intended to provide relevant Canadian information on exposure to VOCs found indoors and outdoors. In addition, due to the different VOC signature produced by environmental tobacco smoke, the indoor VOC results are presented separately for homes with and without smokers.

Last Updated: May 31, 2021
Date Published: May 28, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV XLS
Keywords:  Volatile organic compound, VOC, indoor air quality, indoor VOC, outdoor VOC, smoking, air quality, Regina
Federal

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used in the production of polycarbonate (PC) and epoxy resins. PC is used in food storage containers such as water bottles, and epoxy resins are used in the internal coating for food and beverage cans to protect the food from direct contact with metal. Under certain conditions, small amounts of BPA can migrate from PC plastic containers and cans with epoxy coating into foods, especially at elevated temperatures. BPA is an endocrine disruptor, and mimics the action of the hormone estrogen, although its potency is orders of magnitude lower than endogenous estrogens.

Last Updated: Jan. 18, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 4, 2022
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Total, Diet, Foods, Composites, Bisphenol A, BPA, market basket survey, TDS, Total Diet Study
Federal

The Canadian Total Diet Study (TDS) is a food surveillance program that monitors the concentrations of chemical contaminants in foods that are typically consumed by Canadians. The TDS measures priority chemicals in food samples either annually, on a pre-determined cycle or in response to a specific food safety issue.

Last Updated: Dec. 2, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 15, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian total-diet-study, TDS, food surveillance program, concentrations of chemical-contaminants, chemical-contaminants in foods, chemicals in food-samples
Federal

Short-term exposure to high levels of some Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) can cause breathing problems and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat and headaches.

Last Updated: Dec. 2, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 12, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Volatile organic compounds, VOC
Federal

A residential indoor air quality study was conducted by Health Canada in 2009 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A range of air parameters typically found in and around residences was measured for seven consecutive 24-hour periods in 50 homes during the winter and summer seasons, with 42 homes participating in both seasons. Among the different pollutants measured, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using Summa canisters. The sample canisters were analyzed for 193 polar and non-polar VOCs.

Last Updated: May 18, 2021
Date Published: May 10, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV XLS
Keywords:  Volatile organic compound, Indoor Air Quality, VOC
Federal

Health Canada and the University of Windsor collected 24-hour personal, indoor, and outdoor exposure samples for 188 polar and non-polar volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A total of 100 study participants in Windsor, Ontario were followed over two 1-year periods. Sampling took place in 8-week winter and summer periods of 2005 and 2006. In 2005, five consecutive 24-hour VOC sampling measurements were obtained to represent indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure levels.

Last Updated: Apr. 28, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 16, 2021
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: CSV XLS
Keywords:  Volatile organic compound, indoor exposure, outdoor exposure, polar, non-polar, VOC
Federal

Radionuclides are elements that release energy called radiation. Radionuclides originate from both natural (e.g. soil and rock) and artificial (e.g. certain industrial, military and medical applications) sources (https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/health-risks-safety/radiation/types-sources/environmental.html).

Last Updated: Feb. 10, 2022
Date Published: May 1, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: TXT CSV
Keywords:  Total, Diet, Foods, Composites, Radionuclides, Cesium, Iodine, Americium, Lead
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