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Found 10 records similar to Proposed changes to Canada’s Criminal Code relating to conversion therapy

Federal

Briefing binder used by Hon. Bardish Chagger before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights (Just) Bill C-6, An Act To Amend The Criminal Code (Conversion Therapy), November 26, 2020.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 24, 2021
Organization: Canadian Heritage
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  briefing binder, committee appearance
Federal

The Minister of Justice prepares a "Charter Statement" to help inform the public and Parliamentary debate on a government bill. One of the Minister of Justice's most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for consistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms ["The Charter"]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for consistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 8, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2020
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada Publications, Criminal Code, Conversion therapy, LGBTQ2
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 8, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada, 44th Parliament: 1st Session, Publications, Conversion therapy
Federal

The Criminal Code is a federal law that includes definitions of most of the criminal offences that the Parliament of Canada has enacted. It is often updated as society evolves and to improve the Canadian criminal process.

Last Updated: Jun. 14, 2021
Date Published: Jun. 4, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: XML PDF HTML
Keywords:  Criminal Code, Legislation, Criminal justice, Infographic, Legal information
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 13, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada Publications, Health professionals, 44th Parliament: 1st Session
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 30, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 30, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  44th Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System, Criminal Code, Coronavirus, Covid-19
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 1, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Coronavirus, Covid-19, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada Publications, 43rd Parliament: 2nd Session
Federal

In 2018, Parliament enacted former Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, S.C. 2018, c. 21 (hereinafter referred to as “the Act”) to create new and stronger laws to combat impaired driving. The Act introduced a robust drug-impaired driving regime to coincide with the legalization of cannabis, as well as reformed the Criminal Code alcohol-impaired driving regime to create a new, modern, simplified and more coherent system to better deter, detect, and prosecute impaired drivers. The Act was introduced with an ultimate objective of reducing deaths and injuries caused by impaired drivers on Canadian roads. The Act came into force in two stages: the drug-impaired driving amendments came into force on Royal Assent on June 21, 2018 and the more comprehensive reform which was a complete repeal and replacement of the transportation regime came into force on December 18, 2018.

Last Updated: Mar. 31, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 16, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Bill C-46, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (offences relating to conveyances) and to make consequential amendments to other Acts, S.C. 2018 c. 21, Drug-impaired driving, Cannabis
Federal

1 in 8 people (4 million Canadians) get sick each year from contaminated food.

Over 11,500 hospitalizations and 240 deaths occur each year due to food-related illnesses.

Numbers includes both estimates for 30 foodborne pathogens and unknown causes of acute gastrointestinal illness.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2015
Organization: Public Health Agency of Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Food-related illnesses, hospitalizations, deaths, Canada, Norovirus, Listeria, Salmonella, E. Coli O157, Campylobacter
Federal

This report presents findings on the representation and outcomes of Indigenous people as accused in Canadian criminal courts. This is the first time that national statistics on Indigenous accused in criminal courts are reported in Canada. This study addresses four key objectives:

Identify whether the criminal court process itself contributes to the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system (CJS);

Identify disproportionality in court outcomes of Indigenous accused, compared to White accused, at key stages/decision points of the criminal court process;

Identify whether other sociodemographic variables (e.g., sex and age group) affect the level of disproportionate outcomes experienced by Indigenous people at key stages/decision points of the criminal court process; and,

Identify areas that warrant further exploration and data development. This study was a collaborative effort between the Research and Statistics Division at the Department of Justice Canada and the Canadian Centre for Justice and Community Safety Statistics at Statistics Canada.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 29, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  criminal justice system, court outcomes, Indigenous people, sentencing outcomes, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous overrepresentation
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