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Found 10 records similar to Canadian Water Resources Vulnerability Index - Permafrost Loss

Federal

Permafrost and the active layer (the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually) are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 2014, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed in Ukkusiksalik National Park, less than 2 km from Wager Bay, as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ukkusiksalik National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Wager Bay
Federal

The map shows the location of the continuous permafrost zone and the discontinuous permafrost zone including areas of wide spread permafrost, areas of scattered permafrost and permafrost areas in the Cordillera. The map also indicates for six locations (Inuvik, Yellowknife, Thompson, Resolute, Rankin Inlet and Schefferville) the thickness of permafrost in metres and the ground temperature. Permafrost is a term used to describe the thermal condition of earth materials, such as soil and rock, when their temperature remains below 0 degrees Celsius continuously for more than 1 year. One-half of Canada's land surface is underlain by permafrost.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  hydrogeology, hydrology, permafrost
Federal

Permafrost and the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually, known as the active layer, are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 1999, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed in Quttinirpaaq National Park near Tanquary Fiord as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Quttinirpaaq National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Ellesmere Island, Tanquary Fiord
Federal

Permafrost and the active layer (the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually) are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 2009, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed in Auyuittuq National Park near Owl River as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: May 30, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Auyuittuq National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Owl River, Akshayuk Pass
Federal

Permafrost and the active layer (the soil layer above the permafrost that freezes and thaws annually) are directly affected by climate. It is anticipated that rising temperatures in the Arctic will lead to permafrost warming/melt and thickening of the active layer. Probable impacts of permafrost degradation on the tundra ecosystem include ground instability and changes to local hydrological patterns and surface vegetation. In 2008 and 2009, a Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Grid was installed at two sites, one on Bylot Island and another on the Borden Peninsula, in Sirmilik National Park as part of an international program to monitor the effects of climate change on the active layer and near-surface permafrost.

Last Updated: May 30, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Sirmilik National Park, active layer, permafrost, thaw tubes, ground temperature, climate change, Bylot Island, Borden Peninsula
Federal

Amphibians are vulnerable to an array of
environmental changes because of their
permeable skin, a complex life history, and a dependence on moist terrestrial or wetland habitats. These attributes make them excellent indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems. Amphibians can indicate problems of air and water pollution, drought, habitat loss and
fragmentation, the introduction of non-native species such as sport fish and bullfrogs, and the emergence and spread of infectious disease. Amphibian occupancy is determined using auditory and visual encounters surveys.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Amphibian occupancy, boreal chorus frog, western toad, long-toed salamander, columbia spotted frog, Alberta
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 30, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, snow
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, snow
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 30, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, permafrost
Federal

Permafrost and snow are critical to the ecology of many northern ecosystems. They influence hydrology and vegetation and can dramatically affect the quality of wildlife habitat. In recent decades permafrost temperatures in North America have increased and snowfall and spring snow cover in the Arctic have declined. These trends are predicted to continue, although with regional and seasonal variability.

Last Updated: Oct. 29, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 28, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vuntut, Old Crow Flats, permafrost
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