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Found 10 records similar to Toxicity of azo dyes to benthic invertebrates

Federal

Synthetic dyes are extensively used in many industrial and consumer products, including paper productions, leather tanning, food colouring, personal care products (examples being; hair colour, deodorant etc.). Synthetic dyes are also used in textile paints. No method has been able to completely remove these pollutants from wastewater and 10-15% of the dyes eventually enter aquatic ecosystem. In Canada as part of the Government of Canada's Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), substances that are used in industries or imported in as products are being assessed for potential human and environmental toxicity.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: May 11, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Azo dye, Anthracenedione dye, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), Acid Blue 80, Acid Blue 129, Disperse Yellow 7, Sudan Red G, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Water Chemistry
Federal

Government of Canada information on the labelling requirements of permanent and semi-permanent hair dyes including warnings about ingredient sensitivities and the importance of carrying out a preliminary test for skin irritation.

Last Updated: Mar. 1, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 14, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Cosmetics, health risk, guidance document, hair dyes, labelling requirements of permanent and semi-permanent hair dyes
Federal

Substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) are used in the production of a variety of consumer products (lubricants, dyes, and polymers). Substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) increase the life of consumer products by preventing the chain reaction of free radical production initiated by exposure to heat, oxygen, ozone, radiation and stress. It is important to consider that based on their physicochemical properties, substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) are likely to partition into sediment when they enter an aquatic system. Thus the most likely environmentally relevant pathway for fish to become exposed to SPAs would be through contaminated sediment.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 1, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs), sediment, toxicity, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Contaminants, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)
Federal

Information received in response to the notice with respect to certain aromatic amines and aromatic azo and benzidine-based substances (2011). To increase transparency and to facilitate access to information on substances in commerce in Canada, the Government of Canada is providing the summary of the information received in response to the Notice with respect to certain aromatic amines and aromatic azo- and benzidine-based substances, which was published in the Canada Gazette in December 2011. The data gathering was conducted under the Substance Groupings Initiative of the second phase of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), to support risk assessment and risk management activities for these substances. The information gathered under this initiative includes general information on what was received including the type of submission, the main substances reported, activities, substance functions and commercial uses reported, the main industrial sectors involved, and the scientific studies reported for each substance.

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 9, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: DOC HTML PDF CSV XLS
Keywords:  Chemical industry, Canada Gazette, data gathering, section 71, s.71, Canadian Environmental Protection Act, CEPA 1999, chemical substances, substance grouping initiative
Federal

The main objective of this targeted survey was to generate information on the presence and levels of non-permitted colours in red palm oils available on the Canadian retail market. Colours are added to foods to compensate for the natural colour loss due to processing, to achieve a uniform product colour and to make food appear more appealing. This targeted survey is focused on non-permitted colours, Sudan III and IV, in red palm oils because they are potentially toxic and carcinogenic. Sudan III and IV are red dyes used for industrial products such as textiles, polish and paints and are banned for use in food.

Last Updated: Aug. 18, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 17, 2022
Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  food safety, chemistry, chemical residues, palm oil, food colours
Federal

The main objective of this targeted survey was to generate information on the presence and levels of non-permitted colours in red palm oils available on the Canadian retail market. Colours are added to foods to compensate for the natural colour loss due to processing, to achieve a uniform product colour and to make food appear more appealing. This targeted survey is focused on non-permitted colours, Sudan III and IV, in red palm oils because they are potentially toxic and carcinogenic. Sudan III and IV are red dyes used for industrial products such as textiles, polish and paints and are banned for use in food.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 20, 2022
Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Food safety, chemistry, chemical residues, palm oil, food colours
Federal

The Pulp & Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER) were published in 1992 pursuant to the Fisheries Act to control effluent discharges and reduce the impacts of effluents on fish and fish habitat that had been observed at pulp and paper mills across Canada at that time. The Regulations set out limits for certain deleterious substances, prohibit the discharge of effluent that is acutely lethal to rainbow trout, and specify the requirements for carrying out effluent sampling, reporting and environmental effects monitoring (EEM). The Regulations are administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC). Regulatory data collected under the PPER has been compiled and formatted by ECCC for the purpose of this data record.

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 1, 2021
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Pulp and Paper, Effluent, Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations, Effluent Quality, Toxicity, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, SS, BOD, Suspended Solids
Federal

​Canadian Food Inspection Agency collects samples of spices to verify accurate representation. The samples of spices are tested for the presence of fillers (such as wheat (gluten) and nut shells (peanut and almond)) and undeclared additives used to enhance their apparent value (such as colouring agents (colours, dyes and lead chromate)).

Additional Information:

Last Updated: May 12, 2022
Date Published: May 12, 2022
Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  spices, composition, fraud, authenticity, misrepresentation
Federal

Uranium is widespread in nature and has been identified in many different minerals. It exists in several chemical oxidation states. Although natural uranium is a weakly radioactive substance, the principal health effects associated with natural uranium are due to its chemical toxicity. The maximum acceptable concentration is established based on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and the focus of this document is limited to uranium's chemical properties.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 15, 2019
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, uranium, natural-uranium in drinking-water, health risks
Federal

The toxicity and bioconcentration of 3 pharmaceuticals (amitriptyline, iopamidol, and sertraline) were examined using multiple life stages (larval, juvenile, and adult) of the unionid mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea. The endpoints examined varied with life stage but included survival, behavior (algal clearance rate, filtering frequency), and oxidative stress. Glochidia and juveniles were more sensitive than adult mussels. However, the compounds examined were not toxic at concentrations detected in the environment.

Last Updated: Apr. 22, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 4, 2022
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML CSV
Keywords:  Amitriptyline, Iopamidol, Sertraline, Pharmaceuticals, Bioconcentration, Freshwater mussel, The New Substances Assessment and Control Bureau (NSACB), Aquatic ecosystems, Toxicology
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