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Found 10 records similar to Historic mercury and heavy metal deposition across Canada reconstructed from lake sediment cores

Federal

The Flin Flon copper–zinc smelter is a site of concern as it has been the largest single source of atmospheric mercury emissions in Canada until operations ceased on July 1, 2010. The smelting and mining activities resulted in mercury contamination to the local environment. Elevated levels of mercury and other trace metals were found in soil humus, peat, plants, fish and sediment cores. The Flin Flon smelter of the Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Company is located near the Manitoba–Saskatchewan border, 600 km Northwest of Winnipeg and over 400 km away from other major industrial complexes.This study examined nine lakes (Nekik, Douglas, Loucks, Phantom, McClurg, Cleaver, Naosep, Hamel, and Meridian) each lake was located at varying differences within 75 km of the smelter stack these lakes were selected for sediment coring analysis and heavy metal deposition trends.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 13, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Lake sediment cores, Atmospheric deposition, Heavy metals, Climate change, Historic trends, Climate Change and Air Pollutants (CCAP), Mercury, Contaminants, Flin Flon
Federal

The Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), in Ontario, Canada, is a sensitive region for heavy metal contamination, such as mercury, in part due to long-range atmospheric deposition from global and regional industrial regions. The region is remote from industrial centres, but is downwind of major pollution sources in North America and Canada, and historically had numerous gold mining sites. Supplemental Information

The Climate Change and Air Pollution (CCAP) program was established in 2016 to identify the severity and extent of adverse impacts of current and future air emissions on aquatic ecosystems to support regulatory actions and policy development. The program includes a number of components, including identifying, monitoring and defining air quality and greenhouse gas (GHG) concerns; improving our understanding of the short- and long-term effects of atmospheric pollutants on the environment; developing a plan to combat climate change; and monitoring and reducing both domestic and transboundary emissions of GHGs.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Lake sediment cores, Atmospheric deposition, Heavy metals, Climate change, Historic trends, Climate Change and Air Pollutants (CCAP), Mercury, Contaminants, Biochemicals
Federal

Kejimkujik National Park, in Nova Scotia, Canada, is a sensitive region for heavy metal contamination, such as mercury, in part due to long-range atmospheric deposition from global and regional industrial regions. The region is remote from industrial centres, but is downwind of major pollution sources in North America and Canada, and historically had numerous gold mining sites. The region has also experienced anthropogenic acidification from sulphate deposition over the 20th century, which has resulted in limnological conditions favourable for mercury (Hg) methylation within Kejimkujik lakes. Kejimkujik is therefore known to be a hotspot for methylmercury (MeHg) bioaccumulation and biomagnification, with the highest mercury concentrations detected within common loon (Gavia immer) populations across Canada and North America.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Lake sediment cores, atmospheric deposition, heavy metals, Climate change, Historic trends, Climate Change and Air Pollutants (CCAP), Mercury, Biochemicals
Federal

Recent and historical deposition of mercury (Hg) are examined over a broad geographic area from southwestern Northwest Territories to Labrador and from the U.S. Northeast to northern Ellesmere Island using dated sediment cores from 50 lakes (18 in midlatitudes (41-50 degrees North), 14 subarctic (51-64 degrees North) and 18 in the Arctic (65-83 degrees North)). Objectives were to quantify latitudinal and longitudinal trends of anthropogenic mercury deposition in eastern and northern North America, to investigate variations in mercury deposition, to examine relationships with lake area, catchment/lake area ratio and sedimentation rates, and to compare results with model predictions. Distinct increases of mercury over time were observed in 76% of Arctic, 86% of subarctic and 100% of midlatitude cores. Subsurface maxima in mercury depositional fluxes were observed in only 28% of midlatitude lakes and 18% of arctic lakes, indicating little recent reduction of inputs.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 30, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), Mercury, Contaminants, Sediment cores, Northern Ecosystem Initiative (NEI), Toxic Substances Research Initiative (TSRI), Arctic lakes, Subarctic lakes, Mid-latitude lakes
Federal

Sediment from Lakes

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 47 elements including numerous metals, and visible reflectance spectroscopy or VRS-chla have been determined in sediment core samples collected in 2012, 2013 and 2014 from 16 small (surface area 4-97 ha; maximum depth ~1-5 m deep), hydrologically simple lakes located 30 to 120 km from major oil sands development areas. Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) guidelines are available for 13 of the 53 PAHs reported here. Sediment concentrations did not exceed Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) probable effects levels (PELs), which define the level above which biological adverse effects are expected to occur, for PAHs in any lake. Exceedances of the CCME interim sediment quality guidelines (ISQG) for the protection of aquatic life occurred for 4 PAHs (naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene phenanthrene, and benzo(a)pyrene) in 8 lakes.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  sediment, sediment quality, sediment cores, lake, oil sands, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, physical, chemical
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has been monitoring trace metals in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the oil sands region since December 2010. Active PM2.5 sampling is collected at the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations: Mannix (AMS5), Lower Camp (AMS11) and Fort McKay South (AMS13; until March 2015), using the established protocols and schedule of the National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) Program. In 2015, sampling began for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 (coarse fraction) at the Fort McKay (AMS1), Wapasu (AMS17) and Stony Mountain (AMS18) sites. The data from the measurements conducted so far show that concentrations of metals decrease with distance from the main surface mining and upgrading activities, and that the crustal elements iron, silicon, aluminum, and calcium are present in greater abundance than other metals detected.

Last Updated: Jul. 24, 2019
Date Published: Apr. 1, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  deposition, particulate metals, active sampling, oil sands, fine particulate matter, PM2.5, modelling, air quality
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Deposition data include:

  • Passive Sampling of PACs deployed for two month periods across a network of 17 sites

  • Active sampling of PACs at three sites to inform the amount of dry deposition

  • Particulate metals (24 hour integrated samples following the one in six day National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) cycle)

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Air - Quality, Provide Air Quality/UV Information Products and Services, Monitor Air Quality and UV Parameters and Manage Data, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Air quality
Federal

Fire plays an important role in maintaining health of forests and grasslands, and maintains biodiversity by creating a mosaic of varying age structure. The fescue grasslands of the Foothills Parkland Ecoregion were historically maintained by fire, both from natural causes and by First Nations. More than a century of fire suppression has contributed to loss of open grasslands due to shrub and aspen encroachment. The Area Burned Condition Class (ABCC) measure is designed to be evaluated and reported as a management effectiveness monitoring measure within the Waterton Lakes Conservation and Restoration (CORE) project (Rescue the Fescue).

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  area disturbed by fire, area burned difference, prescribed burning, GIS, area burned condition class, degree of departure, Conservation and Restoration project, Rescue the Fescue, Alberta
Federal

Monitoring activities have collected bulk suspended sediment samples using continuous flow centrifuges and Phillips Tube samplers in the Lower Athabasca River and tributaries respectively. Further, in the absence of pre-development monitoring for this region, high fidelity dated lake sediment cores were used to assess the natural range in contaminant deposition to this region and to obtain a historical perspective of contaminant loadings. All sediments (suspended river and lake cores) have been analyzed in the laboratory for sediment quality variables as per Appendix B in the Integrated Monitoring Plan (cores were also analyzed for paleo indicators of ecosystem health such as diatoms). In addition, as the Lower Athabasca river bed sediments are known to shift and migrate downstream, bathymetric maps of the bed-channel morphology over time was also completed.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 30, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Water, Assess Toxicity; Manage and Monitor for Environmental Presence of Hazardous Substances and Waste, Monitor / Assess Substance and Waste Levels in Air; Water; Soil; Biota, Water - Drainage regions - Peace–Athabasca, Sediments, Oil sands
Provincial
Indices, deposits, mines and quarries include information related to crushed architectural or industrial stone, non-metallic substances, and metallic substances.**This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**
Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 7, 2018
Organization: Government and Municipalities of Québec
Formats: SHP WMS FGDB/GDB GPKG HTML CSV
Keywords:  lodgings, indices, crushed architectural stone, industrial architectural stone, metallic substances, non-metallic substances, Government information
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