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Found 10 records similar to Cumulative effects of municipal effluent and parasite infection in yellow perch

Federal

This study aimed to better understand in situ cumulative effects of anthropogenic stressors on the health of St. Lawrence River (QC, Canada) yellow perch (Perca flavescens) populations using high-throughput transcriptomics and a multi-biological level approach. Fish were collected in the upstream fluvial Lake Saint-François (LSF) with low degree of environmental perturbations; Lake Saint-Louis (LSL) considered having a moderate degree of anthropogenic stressors, and Lake Saint-Pierre (LSP) a sector where the perch population has been severely declining.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  St. Lawrence River, Lake Saint-Pierre, Lake Saint-Louis, Lake Saint-Francois, Yellow perch (Perca flavescens), RNA-sequencing, Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI), Strategic Technology Applications of Genomicsin the Environment (STAGE), St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP)
Federal

The study examines the parasite communities in Athabasca River Trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) at five sites along the main stem of the Athabasca River to explore whether any observed changes in parasite abundance or community structure might correlate with small-scale variations in water chemistry, sediment characteristics, water and sediment pollution, larger-scale landscape use patterns, distance among sites, and upstream-downstream gradients.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 14, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Athabasca River trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus), Fish, parasite communities, Athabasca River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Federal

The Richelieu River, Quebec, is a highly-regulated waterway subject to numerous anthropogenic influences from municipal effluents and agricultural activities. Parasite communities in 234 spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius) were examined from 4 localities in late spring 2003 and 2004. Parasite component community similarity among localities could not be directly linked to available upstream water quality measurements or anthropogenic activity and was best explained by precipitation. This study suggests that fish parasite species composition and richness in the Richelieu River are influenced by environmental parameters which in turn ultimately are driven by a combination of climatic conditions and anthropogenic activities in the watershed.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, precipitation, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), Richelieu River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Federal

In this study, seven non‐specific biomarkers were compared in Spottail Shiners (Notropis hudsonius Clinton) from localities receiving urban and industrial effluents and relatively clean localities in the St Lawrence River, Canada. Pigmented macrophages are involved in a variety of functions including the detoxification and recycling of exogenous and endogenous material, responses to foreign material or infectious agents, and antigen recognition. Pigmented macrophage aggregates are focal accumulations of pigmented macrophages found in the spleen, kidney, liver and other organs of fishes. They may respond to toxicants or exposure to infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria either by increasing in number and size or by changing the shape of the aggregation.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), pigmented macrophages, St. Lawrence River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Provincial

Placer mining involves washing stream gravel to separate and save free gold particles. Usually a placer mine must discharge excess effluent water, which contains some residual suspended fine silt and clay particles, from a settling pond, back into the stream. This study examines the applicability of introducing placer effluent through a diffuser to lessen environmental impact. A diffuser is a mechanism which introduces effluent fluid into the main current of a receiving stream so that mixing and dispersion are facilitated.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 12, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Federal

The Niagara River was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Niagara River is a 58-km waterway connecting Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 19, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Niagara River, Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP), Area of Concern, remedial and restoration, binational policy, remediation, partnerships, beneficial use impairments, Environment
Federal

The Pulp & Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER) were published in 1992 pursuant to the Fisheries Act to control effluent discharges and reduce the impacts of effluents on fish and fish habitat that had been observed at pulp and paper mills across Canada at that time. The Regulations set out limits for certain deleterious substances, prohibit the discharge of effluent that is acutely lethal to rainbow trout, and specify the requirements for carrying out effluent sampling, reporting and environmental effects monitoring (EEM). The Regulations are administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC). Regulatory data collected under the PPER has been compiled and formatted by ECCC for the purpose of this data record.

Last Updated: Feb. 16, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 1, 2021
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Pulp and Paper, Effluent, Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations, Effluent Quality, Toxicity, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, SS, BOD, Suspended Solids
Provincial

Industrial wastewater monitoring data submitted quarterly to the Ministry of the Environment. This reporting is required by the Effluent Monitoring and Effluent Limits (EMEL/MISA) Regulations. Data is available by individual years. *[EMEL]: Effluent Monitoring and Effluent Limits *[MISA]: Municipal Industrial Strategy for Abatement

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2020
Organization: Government of Ontario
Formats: XLSX HTML XLS PDF
Keywords:  Environment and Natural Resources, Environment and energy
Federal

The Metal Mining Effluent Regulations came into force in 2002 pursuant to the Fisheries Act to regulate the deposit of mine effluent and mine waste into waters frequented by fish. The Metal Mining Effluent Regulations were amended in 2018, and are now known as the Metal and Diamond Mining Effluent Regulations. The Regulations help protect Canada’s lakes and rivers by setting strict limits on the quality of effluent that can be discharged by metal and diamond mines. The Regulations authorize the deposit of effluent into water frequented by fish and places referred to in subsection 36(3) of the Fisheries Act.

Last Updated: May 13, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 15, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: KML PDF HTML CSV
Keywords:  Mining industry, Water pollution, metal, mining, mine, effluent, waste rock, tailings, MMER
Federal

Freshwater mussels contribute important ecological functions to aquatic systems. The water filtered by mussel assemblages can improve water quality, and the mixing of sediments by burrowing mussels can improve oxygen content and release nutrients. However, nearly 70 percent of North American freshwater mussel species are listed as either endangered, threatened, or in decline. In Ontario, 28 species are in decline or in need of protection.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 8, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  freshwater mussels, glochidea, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Villosa iris, species at risk, pesticides, neonicotinoids, contaminants, viability
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