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Found 10 records similar to Precipitation Days and Precipitation Variability

Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps for the annual total precipitation. Annual precipitation is defined as the sum of rainfall and the assumed water equivalent of snowfall for a given year. A specific gravity of 0.1 for freshly fallen snow is used, which means that ten inches (25.4 cm) of freshly fallen snow is assumed to be equal to one inch (2.54 cm) of rain. The mean annual total precipitation and snowfall maps on this plate are primarily based on thirty-year data during the period 1921 to 1950 inclusive.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a plate with seven maps. The first maps shows mean annual precipitation for Canada. Four additional maps shows mean annual precipitation for four separate months. The final two maps show mean growing season precipitation and mean number of days with measurable precipitation.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1991
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, weather
Federal

The map shows the annual mean total precipitation. Over much of the continental interior of Canada, precipitation reaches its annual maximum in the summer months and falls as rain. October marks the transition from mainly rain to snowfall across northern Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four maps of the mean precipitation for spring (March to May), summer (June to August), fall (September to November) and winter (December to February). The total precipitation for any season is the sum of the rainfall and one-tenth of the snowfall for that particular three-month period. The mean seasonal precipitation is the mean of the seasonal totals during the period 1921 to 1950 inclusive.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the snow cover data, referring primarily to the presence and total depth of a snow cover on the surface of the earth, across Canada. This is in contrast to data characteristics of snow cover depth, which increases by the occurrence of freshly fallen snow, but decreases by melting, wind action and settling. Two maps of these maps show the mean dates of the occurrence of first and last snow covers by one inch (2.54 cm) or greater. These are not necessarily the average dates to the beginning and ending of a continuous snow cover, since the snow cover may form and later disappear once or several times during a winter season.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the average annual number of days with precipitation. The main map is accompanied by a supplementary map at a scale of 1:40 000 000, outlining precipitation regions. As well, climatic graphs for selected stations which are noted on the supplementary map are included.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 1969
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, weather
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate comprised of 11 maps. The two maps at the top of the plate show isothermal lines for summer and for the entire year, with temperature units measured in Fahrenheit. The annual isothermal lines follow an Easterly and Westerly direction which would obscure the beneficial effect indicated by the summer isotherms. The next four maps show precipitation and snowfall for Eastern and Western Canada in inches.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in annual mean precipitation from the period 1961 to 1990 to the period 2040 to 2060 for Canada is shown on this map. In general, precipitation would increase as the century progresses and the climate warms and this is reflected in the annual average pattern. Also, the simulations show there are regions of both increasing and decreasing precipitation. Warmer surface temperature would speed up the hydrological cycle at least partially, resulting in faster evaporation and more precipitation.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in mean annual precipitation from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2040 to 2060, is shown on this map. On average, precipitation increases, but it is not evenly distributed geographically. There are marked regions of decreasing, as well as increasing precipitation, over both land and ocean. Annual average precipitation generally increases over northern continents, and particularly during the winter.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in mean annual precipitation from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2080 to 2100 is shown on this map. On average, precipitation increases, but it is not evenly distributed geographically. There are marked regions of decreasing, as well as increasing precipitation, over both land and ocean. Annual average precipitation generally increases over northern continents, and particularly during the winter.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
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