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Found 10 records similar to Cause-Effect Monitoring Migratory Landbirds at Local Scales, Oil Sands Region

Federal

Regional-scale monitoring focuses on understanding how and why boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity across the Peace, Athabasca and Cold Lake oil sands area. Data are collected across multiple habitat types and across a range of disturbance intensities from low to high. Bird data were collected in various habitats, including some previously unsurveyed habitats, to fill information gaps in bird-habitat associations. Dataset 1 (2011–2013) comprises bird surveys in 41 representative habitat types within the Athabasca, Peace River and Cold Lake oil sands areas.

Last Updated: Jul. 25, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Oil sands, Migratory birds, Canada Warbler, species at risk, landbirds, birds, mixedwood, forest, vegetation
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s cause-effect monitoring is focused on understanding how boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity in the oil sands area, particularly the impact of the physical disturbance of forested habitats from exploration, development and construction of oil sands. Determining the abundance of songbird species associated with various habitat type(s) and understanding how the type and number of birds varies with type and amount of habitat, are important components of assessing the effect of habitat disturbance. Regional-scale monitoring focuses on understanding how and why boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity across the Peace, Athabasca and Cold Lake oil sands area. Local-scale projects focus on addressing gaps in our understanding of complex response patterns at regional scales by targeting specific habitats or development features of interest.

Last Updated: Jun. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Canada Warbler; species at risk; landbirds; birds; mixedwood; forest; vegetation; point count; avian; spot mapping, Nature and Biodiversity - Habitat, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Expand Scientific Knowledge/Develop New Methodologies for Managing; Protecting and Restoring Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Migratory birds, Oil sands
Federal

The old-forest landbird monitoring program was initiated in 2014. Old-forest songbirds are a priority for monitoring because they can be vulnerable to habitat disturbance, and their habitats are less common overall and difficult to restore once disturbed. This augmented program employs a stratified sampling design of point count surveys to improve monitoring of rarer songbirds of conservation concern. These data will also be used to validate models that predict bird population changes in response to oil sands activity and to further refine bird monitoring design.

Last Updated: Jul. 25, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Oil sands, Migratory birds, Landbirds, Birds, Oil Sands, Forest, Boreal, Point Count, Species at Risk
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s monitoring program for species at risk, rare and difficult-to-monitor species uses targeted sampling designs to assess the population status and trend of species that are not readily sampled by other programs. A formal analysis was used to prioritize landbird species for monitoring under this program. Old-forest songbirds were determined to be the highest priority for monitoring because they can be vulnerable to habitat disturbance, and their habitats are less common overall and difficult to restore once disturbed. An old-forest landbird monitoring program was initiated in 2014.

Last Updated: Nov. 5, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Nature and Biodiversity - Habitat, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Migratory birds, Oil sands
Federal

Songbirds are indicators of habitat conditions within forest or bog ecosystems, as these species have a high level of specialisation to various ecological niches and are extremely sensitive to natural processes. In consequence, these communities can demonstrate a rapid response to a broad range of environmental or successional changes at several spatial scales. The purpose of the forest songbirds monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to detect changes in the occurrence of 20 selected avian indicator species over time within specific habitat types: closed-canopy coniferous forest, open-canopy coniferous forest, deciduous forest, closed-canopy mixedwood forest, open-canopy mixedwood forest, late-seral bog, and open bog. The methods for this measure involve the monitoring on a 5-year cycle of 119 point-count stations in summer from mid-May to early August at the early morning hours to correspond with an increase in bird activity.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  songbirds, bird, forest ecosystems, bog ecosystems, point-count stations, bird communities, ecological niche specialization, indicator species, natural processes
Federal

Plant species richness, composition, and soil chemistry parameters were assessed in wetlands and uplands in the oil sands region of northern Alberta. The concentrations of metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in soil and plant samples collected from 2012-2014, and naphthenic acids (NAs) from soil collected in 2012. Vegetation surveys and a seedbank study showed that plant species richness and composition differed among study sites, with more species (many non-native) found at sampling sites located within close proximity to oil sands development and infrastructure compared to sites located further afield. PAH and metal concentrations in soil at sites near oil sands industrial development were generally higher than levels at sites located outside of the immediate surface mining area.

Last Updated: Jun. 28, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 4, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Oil sands, Game (Wildlife), monitoring, biodiversity, contaminants, plants and soil, Observation/Measurement
Federal

The health of individual amphibians, amphibian populations, and their wetland habitats are monitored in the oil sands region and at reference locations. Contaminants assessments are done at all sites. Amphibians developing near oil sands activities may be exposed to concentrations of oil sands-related contaminants, through air emissions as well as water contamination. The focus of field investigations is to evaluate the health of wild amphibian populations at varying distances from oil sands operations.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 24, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; amphibians, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Observation/Measurement, Assess Status of Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

The Forest Bird Monitoring Program (FBMP) has been conducted annually in Ontario since 1987, by Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service (Ontario Region).Each year, between 50 and 150 sites are surveyed by volunteers, who make two 10-minute visits to five point count stations per site. Although the FBMP primarily targets 52 species, it yields data on occurrence and relative abundance for more than 100 species on those sites. The program was designed to investigate spatial and temporal patterns in mature forest-related birds, with monitoring sites selected in off-road locations in core areas of large, mature forests that are protected from active forest management. Thus the FBMP can supplement other avian monitoring programs by providing information on the state of birds associated with mature forest, where habitat conditions are relatively constant.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 18, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML ZIP
Keywords:  Forest, Birds, Monitoring, Habitat, Mature Forest, Woodlots, Birds
Federal

Plant health assessments and vegetation surveys are undertaken at both terrestrial and wetland sites in the oil sands region and in reference areas. Plant monitoring is being conducted for biodiversity and contaminants, and because plants are important both as wildlife habitat and as traditional-use species. Plant and soil samples are collected at monitoring sites near and at varying distances from oil sands operations. Plant tissues are being examined for levels of naphthenic acids (NAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 4, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; plants and soil, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

To assess the toxicity of winter-time atmospheric deposition in the oil sands mining area of Northern Alberta, embryo-larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to snowmelt samples. Snow was collected in 2011–2014 near (< 7 km) oil sands open pit mining operations in the Athabasca River watershed and at sites far from (> 25 km) oil sands mining. Snow was shipped frozen back to the laboratory, melted, and amended with essential ions prior to testing. Fertilized fathead minnow eggs were exposed (< 24 h post-fertilization to 7–16 days post-hatch) to a range of 25%–100% snowmelt.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 28, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML JPG
Keywords:  Oil Sands, Snow Meltwater, Fathead minnow, Alberta Oil Sands, Water quality, Environment, Inland waters
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