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Found 10 records similar to Bank Swallows - Prince Edward Island

Federal

Bank swallows (Riparia riparia) and Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) have been listed as Threatened species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest at variety of sites associated with vertical soil banks, including riverbanks and road cuts. Barn swallows nest at variety of sites associated with vegetation and artificial structures, including meadows and culverts. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, birds, Bank swallow, Riparia riparia, Barn swallow, Hirundo rustica
Federal

This program is used to track Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) population trend, local abundance, and annual survivorship. Bird banding, re-sighting visits and nesting population counts occur annually in the spring, with banding occurring in May to July since 2007, and nesting population counts occurring in late May or early June since 2008. The measurement for this species represents a complete annual census of birds nesting at key nesting locations across the park and is standardized across the three National Parks in the Coastal British Columbia bioregion with links to monitoring programs taking place in Alaska and Washington State. Completely dependent on marine shorelines for its food and nesting, these monogamous and long-lived birds establish well-defined breeding pairs and occupy composite feeding and nesting territories year after year, often along low-sloping gravel or rocky shorelines where intertidal prey are abundant.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), Population trend, Annual survivorship, Abundance, Rocky intertidal habitat
Federal

Aquatic bird eggs are being collected for contaminants analysis. Egg collections in the Peace-Athabasca Delta area support Parks Canada’s activities at Wood Buffalo National Park and the multi-stakeholder Peace-Athabasca Ecosystem Monitoring Program. This monitoring activity employs repeated censuses of birds and builds on initial egg collections made in 2009 from Egg Island (Lake Athabasca) and Wood Buffalo National Park, with the goal of evaluating contaminant burdens, contaminant sources and changes in sources through time. Egg samples are collected from colonial waterbirds California Gulls (Larus californicus), Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus), Ring-billed Gulls (Larus delawarensis), Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) and Common Terns (Sterna hirundo) and insectivorous birds Bank Swallows (Riparia riparia), Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to monitor health and contaminant levels of aquatic and terrestrial birds in the oil sands region and in reference areas.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 22, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; colonial waterbirds; swallows, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

Prince Edward Island with its sandstone bedrock and dynamic sandy beaches is very sensitive to the effects of sea-level rise. The north shore of PEI National Park is exposed to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and large waves and storm surge. By monitoring the nearshore ice, the level of PEI National Park’s coastal protection against erosion during the winter months can be assessed. The combination of rising sea levels, increased storm intensities, and higher waves is predicted to lead to increased flooding, infrastructure loss, and increased erosion in coastal areas.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, coastal, ice, climate change, erosion, time lapse photography
Federal

Red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) are colonial birds found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These piscivorous sea ducks are indicators for the state of the breeding islands and associated marine or estuarine ecosystems, since nest distribution and productivity is closely related to habitat conditions such as the presence of marram grass (Ammophila breviligulata) in addition to sometimes sea lyme grass (Leymus mollis) or common yarrow (Achillea millefolium); while the occurrence of the species is also linked to the scope and abundance of fish resources. The purpose of the red-breasted merganser monitoring program is to determine the annual number of nesting attempts and to measure nest success, as these are important parameters that contribute to breeding population dynamics. The methods for this measure involve an annual census in mid-August where nests (i.e., a bowl with at least one egg) are located by systematically searching the vegetated regions on Tern Islands immediately following the completion of the breeding season.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  red-breasted merganser, Mergus serrator, colonial birds, piscivorous, sea duck, indicator species, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding success
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the tern. Field data from 1992 to 2019. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the terns for their nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Artic Tern, Sterna paradisaea, Common tern, Sterna hirundo, abundance, nest, egg, ecological integrity, coastal
Federal

This set of data contains the results of the various breeding seabird inventories conducted at Forillon National Park. Seabirds are recognized as good indicators of the quality of marine ecosystems and more particularly of the abundance of prey species on which they depend. Monitoring of seabird populations is therefore part of Forillon National Park's ecological integrity monitoring program. The abundance of different seabird species is determined by a total nest count in the cliffs during the nesting period.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  sea birds, inventory, Black-legged kittiwake, gull, Razorbill, Common murre, Black guillemot, Double-crested cormorant, nests
Federal

PEI National Park samples Chlorophyll-a to measure aquatic productivity in four freshwater ponds. The sampling is carried out on an hourly basis between May-October each year using YSI sonde data loggers. In PEINP, all freshwater ponds are shallow (maximum depth is 4.5 m) and non-stratifying. Chlorophyll-a is used to assess primary productivity in freshwater ponds at PEI National Park.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, chlorophyll a, productivity, temperature, pond, primary productivity, data loggers
Federal

Stream benthic invertebrates are important indicators of aquatic health and have been monitored in PEI National Park to assess community diversity as well as abundance of pollution tolerant and intolerant taxa in streams. Benthic invertebrates are collected on an annual basis using the sampling methods developed by Environment Canada for the "CABIN" stream monitoring network. Samples are sorted and invertebrates are classified to the lowest possible taxomonic classification to determine abundance and biodiversity in these aquatic ecosystems. Community biodiversity is assessed using the Simpson’s reciprocal index (D).

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invertebrates, benthic, CABIN, diversity, abundance, pollution, stream
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the common eider. Field data between 1988 to 2015. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the common eider for nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common eider, Somateria mollissima dresseri, abondance, nest, egg, forest, ecological integrity
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