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Found 10 records similar to Bank Swallows - Prince Edward Island

Federal

Bank swallows (Riparia riparia) and Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) have been listed as Threatened species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest at variety of sites associated with vertical soil banks, including riverbanks and road cuts. Barn swallows nest at variety of sites associated with vegetation and artificial structures, including meadows and culverts. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, birds, Bank swallow, Riparia riparia, Barn swallow, Hirundo rustica
Federal

Odonata monitoring is conducted in four shallow water ponds within the wetland ecosystems of PEI National Park. Park staff collect exuviae (the remains of aquatic larval stage exoskeleton) of metamorphosed larvae from the order odonata twice per year: in the early summer (June) and late summer (August) during peak emergence periods. The objective of the measure is to acquire baseline data on the species diversity and relative abundance of dragonflies and damselflies within wetlands of the national park. Taxonomic diversity and abundance are compared against historical levels to assess ecological integrity.

Last Updated: Oct. 8, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, wetlands, odonata, dragonflies, biodiversity, exuviae
Federal

Plant Watch is a national program which has been incorporated into ecological integrity monitoring in PEI National Park. The program adds to understanding of how common plant phenology is responding to climate change. PEI National Park monitors the first bloom Julian dates of four species within the forest ecosystem: Red Maple (Acer rubrum), Eastern Larch (Larix laricina), Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis), and Starflower (Trientalis borealis).

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, PlantWatch, first bloom, bunchberry, Cornus Canadensis, starflower, Trientalis borealis, red maple, Acer rubrum
Federal

Prince Edward Island with its sandstone bedrock and dynamic sandy beaches is very sensitive to the effects of sea-level rise. The north shore of PEI National Park is exposed to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and large waves and storm surge. By monitoring the nearshore ice, the level of PEI National Park’s coastal protection against erosion during the winter months can be assessed. The combination of rising sea levels, increased storm intensities, and higher waves is predicted to lead to increased flooding, infrastructure loss, and increased erosion in coastal areas.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, coastal, ice, climate change, erosion, time lapse photography
Federal

PEI National Park samples Chlorophyll-a to measure aquatic productivity in four freshwater ponds. The sampling is carried out on an hourly basis between May-October each year using YSI sonde data loggers. In PEINP, all freshwater ponds are shallow (maximum depth is 4.5 m) and non-stratifying. Chlorophyll-a is used to assess primary productivity in freshwater ponds at PEI National Park.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, chlorophyll a, productivity, temperature, pond, primary productivity, data loggers
Federal

Stream benthic invertebrates are important indicators of aquatic health and have been monitored in PEI National Park to assess community diversity as well as abundance of pollution tolerant and intolerant taxa in streams. Benthic invertebrates are collected on an annual basis using the sampling methods developed by Environment Canada for the "CABIN" stream monitoring network. Samples are sorted and invertebrates are classified to the lowest possible taxomonic classification to determine abundance and biodiversity in these aquatic ecosystems. Community biodiversity is assessed using the Simpson’s reciprocal index (D).

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invertebrates, benthic, CABIN, diversity, abundance, pollution, stream
Federal

Plant Watch is a national program which has been incorporated into ecological integrity monitoring in PEI National Park. The program adds to understanding of how common plant phenology is responding to climate change. PEI National Park monitors the first bloom Julian dates of five species within the wetland and coastal ecosystems: Bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica), Beach Pea (Lathyrus japonicus), Wildrose (Rosa virginiana), Rhodora (Rhododendron canadense), and Labrador Tea (Ledum groenlandicum).

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, PlantWatch, first bloom, bunchberry, Cornus Canadensis, starflower, Trientalis borealis, red maple, Acer rubrum
Federal

Forest canopy or over-story species composition provides useful information on forest tree species present at the stand and landscape level. Much of PEI National Park’s forest areas were cleared for settlement and agriculture prior to park establishment and have regenerated with early successional softwood species. Forest types, stand area (ha), percent canopy crown coverage and the proportion (percent) of tree species present within National Park forested areas are determined by remote sensing experts every 10 years, where the proportion of PEI National Parks forest ecosystem that is comprised of softwood species is calculated. The observed percent softwood forested area within PEI National Park is compared against the expected percent of softwood composition generated using available soil information to conjecture original forest types and softwood composition by applying Nova Scotia’s Eco-site Classification.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, forest, composition, tree species, crown
Federal

Freshwater ponds are monitored annually for fish species diversity and American eel abundance (catch per unit effort, or CUE), and American eel total length. Hoop traps and gee-type minnow traps are used to sample fish communities in four ponds within PEI National Park. Each pond is sampled over a three day period with a fishing effort of 3 trap nights in 9 different trap sectors of a pond. Species abundance is recorded for each net.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, freshwater, fish, biodiversity, community, pond, abundance, American eel, Anguilla rostrata
Federal

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an alien invasive species that is considered a threat to wetland plant community biodiversity. In PEI National Park, annual monitoring focuses on distribution within the park and individual wetlands, as well as density once detected. Assessing management effectiveness is also a goal of the monitoring program. Each year all known sites containing purple loosestrife are surveyed during the blooming period and management actions (i.e.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, wetlands, invasive species, purple loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria
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