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Found 10 records similar to Number and median age of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities, by highest earned degree, staff functions, rank, gender

Federal

Number of full-time academic teaching staff by professorial rank (total ranks, full, associate, assistant, rank/level below assistant and other (not elsewhere classified)) and sex by province.

Last Updated: Oct. 28, 2021
Date Published: May 18, 2021
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  education training and learning, faculty and teachers, postsecondary education, table
Federal

The number and proportion of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities by academic rank, gender and academic year.

Last Updated: Mar. 2, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 13, 2021
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  education training and learning, faculty and teachers, postsecondary education, table
Federal

Number and average, median, 10<sup>th</sup> and 90<sup>th</sup> percentile salaries by rank and senior administrative responsibilities of full-time academic teaching staff by university.

Last Updated: Apr. 26, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 26, 2022
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  earnings and wages by occupation industry or sector, earnings wages and non-wage benefits, education training and learning, faculty and teachers, labour, postsecondary education, sex, table
Provincial

The data represents the relative amount of manure production in the agricultural area of Alberta. It is an estimate of the degree to which livestock production may contribute to nutrient loading, pathogens and odour. The classes shown on the map are ranked between 0 (lowest) and 1 (highest). This resource was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML ZIP WMS HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  alberta, cow poop, downloadable data, environment, farming, fertilizer, livestock housing, livestock management, manure
Provincial

The data represents the relative cultivation intensity in the agricultural area of Alberta. Cultivation intensity refers to the frequency of cultivation associated with the following management systems: no till, conventional tillage and summerfallow. It is an estimate of the degree to which cultivation contributes to wind and water erosion. The classes shown on the map are ranked between 0 (lowest) and 1 (highest).This map was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML ZIP WMS HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  alberta, downloadable data, environment, farming, harvesting frequency, plant production, soil degradation, soil fertility, Government information
Provincial

This map displays an assessment of soil erosion risk for the agricultural area of Alberta. Loss of protective residue cover through cultivation will increase the potential risk of soil erosion. The vulnerability of the soil to erosion combined with the intensity of cultivation determines the degree to which the soil may be at risk. The classes shown on the map were ranked from 0 (lowest risk) to 1 (highest risk).

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: WMS XML HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  alberta, downloadable data, farming, geoscientificinformation, sedimentation, soil degradation, soil loss, Government information
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows 9 maps. Four maps show the average possible hours of sunshine for Canada in the summer months. There is a map for the entire summer and individual maps for each of the summer months (June, July, and August. The other five maps show the number of days during the year with temperatures above 32 degrees F (0 degrees C), 40 degrees F (4.4 degrees C), 50 degrees F (10 degrees C), 60 degrees F (15.6 degrees C) and 70 degrees F (21.1 degrees C).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four maps of certain climatic aspects of the growing seasons. The first map shows the mean annual length of the growing season throughout Canada, assuming the growing season to be that part of the year when the mean daily temperature is above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C). The map was constructed from data for the period 1921-1950 inclusive and is based on the mean annual number of days on which the mean temperature, as estimated from the smoothed annual course of temperature, was above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C). The number of degree-days above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C) is the difference between the daily mean temperature and 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C) when the former is more than 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  agriculture, climate, climate archives, meteorological data, precipitation
Provincial

The data represents the relative expense of fertilizer and lime in the agricultural area of Alberta. It is an estimate of the degree to which agriculture may affect nutrient levels in surface and groundwater. The classes shown on the map are ranked between 0 (lowest) and 1 (highest).Mapping the relative values of fertilizer expenses by SLC polygon area is useful as an indication of where more fertilizer is applied in the province and as a proxy indicator for crop production.It also suggests the relative agricultural intensity in various parts of the province. This resource was created in 2002 using ArcGIS.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML ZIP WMS HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  alberta, chemicals, downloadable data, environment, farming, inlandwaters, soil pollution, water pollution, Government information
Federal

Growing degree days (GDDs) are used to estimate the growth and development of plants and insects during the growing season. Growing Degree Day are computed by subtracting a base value temperature from the mean daily temperature and are assigned a value of zero if negative. Base temperatures are a point below which development does not occur for the organism in question. Growing Degree Day products are created for base 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees Celsius.

Last Updated: May 4, 2022
Date Published: May 5, 2017
Organization: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Formats: WMS PDF HTML GeoTIF ESRI REST
Keywords:  GD, agclimate, Farmlands, Agriculture, Crops, Temperature, Precipitation
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