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Found 10 records similar to Atlantic Colonies - Density Analysis

Federal

These fish-eating colonial waterbirds breed and nest in colonies on islands in and around Fathom Five National Marine Park. Five species of colonial waterbird are monitored. These birds and their eggs are effective measures of environmental contamination and aquatic ecosystem health.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Colonial Waterbirds, environmental contamination, breeding, nesting, islands, aquatic ecosystem health, eggs, Herring Gull, Ring-billed Gull
Federal

Monitoring contaminants in gull and tern eggs is a useful tool for gaining insights into local environmental conditions because gulls and terns are integrators of processes occurring at lower levels in the food web and their eggs are generally formed using local food sources. Therefore, the chemical composition of the egg will reflect the chemical characteristics of the region in the vicinity of the breeding colony, including level of contaminants, such as mercury. Eggs are collected any time after laying, ideally well before hatching, but after the full clutch size (3 eggs) has been reached, generally around the middle of June. The collection site is a colony on Lake Mamawi, in the Peace Athabasca Delta; in addition to collection sites outside the park.

Last Updated: Apr. 23, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Contaminants, chemical composition, mercury level, ring-billed gull, waterbird eggs, Alberta, Northwest Territories
Federal

Herring gull (Larus arentatus, HERG), great blue heron (Ardea Herodias GBHE), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus, DCCO) and ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis, RBGU) have been monitored in Pukaskwa National Park since 1977 as part of the colonial waterbird monitoring program. A complete count of active nests on islands found along the ~120km of coast of Pukaskwa is conducted based on the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) protocol. The nest count is carried out during the peak of breeding over a period of 2-3 weeks. From 1977 – 1981, surveys were conducted annually and used an island numbering system (Old Colony Number in datasheet).

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Colonial waterbirds, Pukaskwa, herring gull, Larus argentatus, great blue heron, Ardea Herodias, double-crested cormorant, Phalacrocorax auritus, ring-billed gull
Federal

Gwaii Haanas has partnered with ECCC to monitor a set of permanent plots mapping colony structure and burrow occupancy rate by excavating samples of burrows of Ancient Murrelet and Cassin’s Auklet. The data are used to determine if the breeding population areas are changing at specific key nesting colonies and if the change signifies an increasing or decreasing population trend. An estimated 1.5 million seabirds breed colonially on the 200+ islands, islets and rocks of Haida Gwaii, including globally and nationally significant proportions of 5 seabird species. A significant threat to breeding seabirds is predation by non-native mammals, notably raccoons and rats.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ancient Murrelet, Cassin’s Auklet, plot system, burrow occupancy, breeding population, breeding seabirds, colony-nesting, British Columbia
Federal

Colonial Waterbird Health and Contaminants

This dataset contains metals, including total mercury levels, stable nitrogen isotope values, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDFs) levels in eggs of seven species of colonial waterbirds (California Gull, Franklin’s Gull, Herring Gull, Ring-billed Gull, Caspian Tern, Common Tern and Forster's Tern). Data are available for 1977, 2009, and 2011 – 2015 for sites located in the Peace-Athabasca Delta/western Lake Athabasca. Geographic coverage was expanded in 2014 and 2015 to include additional egg collection sites across Alberta, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories. While no applicable guidelines exist for these measurements, our expert assessment is that the observed levels of mercury are not likely to pose a risk to these bird populations.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 22, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  oil sands, monitoring, biodiversity, contaminants, colonial waterbirds, swallows, Wildlife, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants
Provincial

The distribution of nesting areas for bird colonies in coastal British Columbia showing relative abundance (RA) by season and overall relative importance (RI). RI is based on project region and not on the province as a whole. Number counts for various species in the colony location are provided. CRIMS is a legacy dataset of BC coastal resource data that was acquired in a systematic and synoptic manner from 1979 and was intermittently updated throughout the years.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  Canada, Seabirds, biology, bird colony, habitat, marine bird, ornithology, population count, shorebird
Federal

The second largest concentration of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in North America is found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These seabirds are indicators for the condition of coastal, marine, as well as estuarine ecosystems due to the use of these nesting and/or breeding grounds, and their reliance on the distribution of small fish populations in lagoons or along the outer beaches of barrier islands throughout the breeding season. The purpose of the common tern colony monitoring program is to determine the annual total number of nests and estimate mean clutch size in order to evaluate long-term breeding population health. The methods for this measure involve an annual systematic census on Tern Islands over a 1-2 day period in mid-to late June during the late incubation stage.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 8, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  common tern, Sterna hirundo, seabird, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding colonies, indicator species, coastal ecosystems, marine ecosystems
Federal

The coastal ecosystem is an indicator of the ecological integrity of the MANPRC. In total, 31 rare plant species are found in the coastal ecosystem of the MANCPR. Rare plants have been selected as a measure of the coastal ecosystem indicator. The objectives of the monitoring program are to detect changes over time in 1) the number of colonies of rare plants and 2) the abundance of focal species.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Rare plants, Cirsium scariosum, Meadow thistle, Taraxacum laurentianum, Gulf of St. Lawrence dandelion, Pedicularis palustris, marsh lousewort, Erigeron lonchophyllus, short-ray fleabane
Federal

The tundra ecosystem is an indicator of the ecological integrity of the MANPRC. In total, 40 rare plant species are found in the tundra of the MANCPR. Rare plants have been selected as a measure of the tundra indicator. The objectives of the monitoring program are to detect changes over time in 1) the number of colonies of rare plants and 2) the abundance of focal species.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Rare plants, Anemone multifida var. multifida, cut-leaved anemone, Cerastium alpinum ssp. Lanatum, woolly alpine chickweed, Cypripedium passerinum, sparrow's-egg lady's-slipper, Cystopteris montana, mountain bladder fern
Federal

This program assesses demographic parameters and breeding abundance of 5 species of ground (burrow) nesting seabirds: Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) at the Seabird Rocks Colony through population counts and capture-mark-recapture techniques. Counts of individuals at the colony are done 3-4 times throughout a breeding season (May-July) to estimate the size of the breeding populations. A banding (capture-mark-recapture) program to estimate annual survivorship of the two storm-petrel species is done via mist-net arrays on two consecutive nights in early May and/or mid-to-late July. This project seeks to track the present status of the ground and burrrow-nesting seabirds on Seabird Rocks and any recovery that may occur due to future habitat restoration and/or predator-control measures.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Nesting seabirds, Breeding abundance, Annual survivorship, Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata)
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