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Found 10 records similar to Black swift - Jasper

Federal

Bank swallows (Riparia riparia) and Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) have been listed as Threatened species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest at variety of sites associated with vertical soil banks, including riverbanks and road cuts. Barn swallows nest at variety of sites associated with vegetation and artificial structures, including meadows and culverts. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, birds, Bank swallow, Riparia riparia, Barn swallow, Hirundo rustica
Federal

This program is used to track Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) population trend, local abundance, and annual survivorship. Bird banding, re-sighting visits and nesting population counts occur annually in the spring, with banding occurring in May to July since 2007, and nesting population counts occurring in late May or early June since 2008. The measurement for this species represents a complete annual census of birds nesting at key nesting locations across the park and is standardized across the three National Parks in the Coastal British Columbia bioregion with links to monitoring programs taking place in Alaska and Washington State. Completely dependent on marine shorelines for its food and nesting, these monogamous and long-lived birds establish well-defined breeding pairs and occupy composite feeding and nesting territories year after year, often along low-sloping gravel or rocky shorelines where intertidal prey are abundant.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani), Population trend, Annual survivorship, Abundance, Rocky intertidal habitat
Federal

Black Oystercatcher breeding success is estimated by visually surveying known breeding habitat in key areas of Gwaii Haanas. Surveys are conducted twice a year during breeding season. Black Oysercatchers are very vulnerable to disturbances, predation of eggs and young, predators, oil spills and reduction of food sources due to global warming. They are also considered to be a keystone species in the north Pacific, and an indicator of the health of the rocky shoreline and intertidal community.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Black Oystercatcher, breeding, breeding success, keystone species, British Columbia, rocky shoreline, intertidal community
Federal

Common nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) inventory supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Common nighthawks are a Threatened Species protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Common nighthawks migrate north between early May to mid-June to breed in or near open or semi-open sites across a variety of habitats. During the breeding season, data are collected at these sites by audio recorders to determine presence/nesting and inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Species at Risk Act, SARA, Chordeiles minor, Common nighthawk
Federal

The number of common loons and their breeding range have decreased significantly since the beginning of the century. There is concern about the number of breeding pairs and the number of fledglings. In order to determine what the population status is throughout La Mauricie National Park, loons are monitored through two aerial surveys carried out over all the lakes in the park of more than three hectares as well as by canoe on the most accessible lakes in order to confirm the presence of loons and locate their nests.

Last Updated: Jun. 13, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Loons, Waterbirds, Common Loon, Population Cycle, Aerial Survey, Canoe, Mauricie
Federal

The Piping Plover in Nova Scotia is listed as ‘endangered’ by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Plovers are sensitive to stressors such as human disturbance and habitat loss. Piping plover breeding population censuses and productivity will be monitored at all coastal beaches in Kejimkujik every year. This work occurs during the plover breeding season (May- August) with 3-5 visits per week at both St.Catherines and Little Port Joli Beaches.

Last Updated: Mar. 21, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Coastal, Piping plover, dunes, Nova Scotia
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the Great black-backed and European herring gulls . Field data from 1996 to 2015. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the Great black-backed and European herring gulls for nesting. The presence of this species is characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Great black-backed gull, European herring gull, abondance, nest, egg, ecological integrity, tundra
Federal

Blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) is an introduced pathogen affecting whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis). Whitebark pine is an endangered species protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and Limber pine is designated as an endangered species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Infection and mortality rates of these species are increasing across their northern range. Every five years, data are collected from permanently marked plots to monitor infection levels across all mountain national parks and at various sites across provinces.

Last Updated: Mar. 8, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Parc, Whitebark pine, Pinus albicaulis, blister rust, Cronartium ribicola, invasive species, introduced species, disease
Federal

Gwaii Haanas has partnered with ECCC to monitor a set of permanent plots mapping colony structure and burrow occupancy rate by excavating samples of burrows of Ancient Murrelet and Cassin’s Auklet. The data are used to determine if the breeding population areas are changing at specific key nesting colonies and if the change signifies an increasing or decreasing population trend. An estimated 1.5 million seabirds breed colonially on the 200+ islands, islets and rocks of Haida Gwaii, including globally and nationally significant proportions of 5 seabird species. A significant threat to breeding seabirds is predation by non-native mammals, notably raccoons and rats.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ancient Murrelet, Cassin’s Auklet, plot system, burrow occupancy, breeding population, breeding seabirds, colony-nesting, British Columbia
Federal

The following snapshot aims to highlight how Anti-Black racism and systemic discrimination are key drivers of health inequalities faced by diverse Black Canadian communities.

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2020
Date Published: Sep. 8, 2020
Organization: Public Health Agency of Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Social determinants, inequities, Black Canadians, anti-Black racism, determinant of health, discrimination, systemic, institutional, education
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