Open Government Portal

Found 10 records similar to Inventory of active beaver colonies - Gros Morne

Federal

The park employs aerial surveys to map active beaver lodges/dams in Terra Nova. A selection of sites are ground-thruthed on foot or by canoe.

Last Updated: Oct. 30, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  beaver, beaver lodge, beaver dam, aerial survey, wetland, Newfoundland
Federal

Stream hydrology strongly affects habitat quality for most stream-dwelling species, and is affected by both climate and land use. This measure, which is colocated with stream temperature regime, reports on flow parameters in 10-12 park streams over time - using in-situ water level data loggers, as well as hydrometric stations.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hydrology, Stream Flow, Water Level, Environment Canada, data loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Elk Island National Park measures beaver abundance and distribution every three years in the fall using aerial surveys to count beaver food caches.

Last Updated: Jun. 5, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Beaver, abundance, distribution, active lodges, aerial survey, beaver food caches, beaver dams, beaver ponds, Alberta
Federal

In eastern Canada, Harlequin ducks are uncommon and are listed by COSEWIC as a species of special concern. Resident of fast flowing-rivers and streams during the breeding season, their presence and abundance reflects the health of these ecosystems. The park censuses harlequin ducks on four rivers and streams of Gros Morne National Park; the Spring breeding survey is done in 1 day of helicopter surveys, every 5 years in May.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Special Concern Species, Harlequin Duck, Aerial Survey, Newfoundland
Federal

Stream thermal regime has important consequences for aquatic organisms, and is sensitive to climate and land use. The Park is monitoring thermal regimes at 10 sites annually from spring to fall using temperature loggers. The water temperature is recorded hourly and these data used to assess the suitability of the thermal environment of streams for Brook Trout.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream Thermal Regime, Salmonid temperature stress, Temperature Loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

The beaver (Castor canadensis) is a large, primarily nocturnal semi-aquatic rodent used as an indicator of the conditions in freshwater ecosystems due to its role as a keystone species and an ecosystem engineer. The potential for beaver colonization within Kouchibouguac National Park is considerable due to the quantity of first and second order streams within its borders. In addition, the most important and preferred food source available to beavers in the Park is the trembling aspen (Populous tremuloides); though this tree species colonizes disturbed areas and is usually replaced by conifers or shade-tolerant hardwoods in long-term succession. Hence, the population dynamics of beavers can reflect large-scale changes in forest ecosystems.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  beaver, Castor canadensis, semi-aquatic, rodent, keystone species, ecosystem engineer, indicator species, ponds, streams
Federal

Beavers are a key component of the Riding Mountain National Park ecosystems. The park surveys active beaver food caches by air in 30 habitat blocks every 3 years. These surveys have been conducted since 1973.

Last Updated: Apr. 18, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Beaver Abundance, beaver food caches, Aerial Survey, Manitoba
Federal

This dataset focuses on monitoring beaver colonies in Forillon National Park. Beavers have a major influence on aquatic ecosystems in the park. Monitoring fluctuations in this population can help us better understand variations in the physicochemical characteristics of watercourses and possibly in other aquatic populations in the park. Beaver colony data are collected primarily as part of a park-wide aerial survey by helicopter.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  beaver, inventory, dam, hut, colony
Federal

Introduced Moose, lacking natural predators in Gros Morne, are causing widespread damage in park forests. Park-wide Moose density will be monitored using aerial surveys and estimated using the Gasaway (1986) stratified random block method. Bull, cow, calf and unknown Moose are counted in randomly-selected blocks expected to have extremely high, high and low moose density. Survey occurs in late February or March, with sufficient snow cover to see tracks.

Last Updated: Jun. 13, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Moose, introduced herbivore, overbrowsing, Aerial Survey, Newfoundland
Federal

Atlantic salmon are an ecologically and culturally important species in healthy aquatic systems of western Newfoundland. This measure determines the status and trend, over a 10 year period, of Atlantic salmon returning to spawn in three rivers in Gros Morne - Western Brook, Trout River and Deer Arm Brook. Secondarily, it will detect invasive anadromous species. A salmonid counting fence is rotated through the 3 rivers.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Atlantic salmon, Western Brook, Deer Arm Brook, Trout River, Fish Fence, non-native anadromous fish, Newfoundland
Date modified: