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Found 10 records similar to Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris) Population Counts, British Columbia, 1977-2013

Provincial

Modeled data showing the likely distribution of sea otters. CRIMS is a legacy dataset of BC coastal resource data that was acquired in a systematic and synoptic manner from 1979 and was intermittently updated throughout the years. Resource information was collected in nine study areas using a peer-reviewed provincial Resource Information Standards Committee consisting of DFO Fishery Officers, First Nations, and other subject matter experts. There are currently no plans to update this legacy data.

Last Updated: May 19, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  distribution, marine mammal, sea otter, Government information
Federal

River otters (Lontra canadensis) are semi-aquatic mammalian predators closely associated to freshwater resources but also linked to terrestrial habitat features, at the aquatic-terrestrial interface of riparian zones. This species is an indicator of freshwater ecosystem conditions as healthy tributaries should be able to sustain populations of this resident top-level predator with two main ecological requirements: the availability of food and shelter opportunities. The purpose of the river otter monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to determine the total number of distinct groups as an indication of population status. The sampling methods for this measure involve an annual census in winter, usually between the end of January to early March, where transects are conducted on the entire lengths of the main watercourses from the estuaries to the Park’s border.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  river otter, Lontra canadensis, semi-aquatic, mammal, predator, indicator species, trophic level, riparian zones, tributaries
Federal

This program measures kelp density from annual dive transects during August and September at a number of sites in the Broken Group Islands of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Kelp species assessed include Agarum spp., Macrocystis pyrifera, Eisenia arborea, Pterygophora californica, Saccharina spp. and Desmarestia spp. Kelp forests are phyletically diverse, structurally complex and highly productive ecosystems in temperate rocky marine coastlines, thereby providing a suitable suite of measures indicative of subtidal ecosystem health.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Kelp ecosystem, Kelp forest, Kelp Density, Agarum spp., Macrocystis pyrifera, Eisenia arborea, Pterygophera californica, Saccharina spp.
Federal

The Fisheries and Oceans Canada ecosystem surveys are conducted annually and are a source of integrated ecosystem monitoring data. These survey data are the primary data source for monitoring trends in species distribution, abundance, and biological condition within the region, and also provide data to the Atlantic Zonal Monitoring Program (AZMP) for monitoring hydrographic conditions, along with zooplankton and phytoplankton. The surveys follow a stratified random sampling design, and include sampling using a bottom otter trawl, CTD rosette and vertical plankton tows. Data from the bottom trawl catch are used to monitor the distribution and abundance of fish and invertebrates throughout the Scotian Shelf, Bay of Fundy and Georges Bank.

Last Updated: May 19, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 14, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Agricultural Aquatic Sciences, Agriculture, Animals/Vertebrates, Aquatic Sciences, Biological Classification, Biosphere, Earth Science, Ecological Dynamics, Fish
Federal

The Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) ecosystem surveys consist of research vessel survey data collected to monitor the distribution and abundance of fish and invertebrates throughout the Scotian Shelf, Bay of Fundy and Georges Bank. The surveys follow a stratified random sampling design, and include sampling of fish and invertebrates using a bottom otter trawl. These survey data are the primary data source for monitoring trends in species distribution, abundance, and biological condition within the region, and also provide data to the Atlantic Zonal Monitoring Program (AZMP) for monitoring hydrographic variability. Collected data includes total catch in numbers and weights by species.

Last Updated: May 19, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 31, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: XLSX CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Agricultural Aquatic Sciences, Agriculture, Animals/Vertebrates, Aquatic Sciences, Biological Classification, Biosphere, Earth Science, Ecological Dynamics, Fish
Federal

Considered the "king" of sea lions, the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) is the biggest of all sea lions and enjoys a lifespan of up to thirty years. In Canada, the Steller can be spotted along the rocky coast of British Columbia. This hefty mammal usually travels alone or in a small group, but wisely, it joins others for protection during the mating and birthing season. Little is known about its oceanic lifestyle; however, the good news for this sea-loving mammal is that since the Steller sea lion first became protected in 1970, the size of the adult population has more than doubled.

Last Updated: Jan. 20, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Steller Sea Lion, Aerial Survey, Abundance, Haulout Location, British Columbia, Pacific, Scientific information, Scientific research, Population distribution
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO’s) conditions of licence for marine finfish aquaculture contain monitoring and intervention requirements to minimize the potential exposure of wild and farmed fish to sea lice. The Industry Sea Lice Abundance Counts report is updated monthly. It shows which Atlantic salmon farms were actively raising fish during the month and the results of industry's monthly sea lice monitoring. Please see the Open Data page for DFO sea lice audits of BC marine finfish aquaculture sites to see data from 2011 to 2015.

Last Updated: Jun. 9, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 3, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, fish farming, salmon farming, sea lice, British Columbia, BC
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 16, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 13, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Campelen, Gulf Biogeographic Zone, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Northern Gulf, Sea Pen Field, Sea Pen, Pennatulacea, Marine biology
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 16, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 13, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Western II A, Gulf Biogeographic Zone, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Southern Gulf, Sea Pen Field, Sea Pen, Pennatulacea, Marine biology
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Sea Pen Field, Sea Pen, Pennatulacea, Western II A, Marine biology
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