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Found 10 records similar to Salmon - Gwaii Haanas

Federal

Salmon escapement data constitute important corporate knowledge which must be adequately maintained and accessible. The Salmon Escapement Database (NuSEDS) is the DFO Pacific Region’s central database that stores individual spawner survey data records, spawner abundance estimates and the linkages between the two. Annual abundance estimates are maintained by population, as defined by freshwater location and run timing. Each population is referenced to the location of the stream mouth.

Last Updated: Sep. 16, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 1999
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV XLS RTF
Keywords:  Pacific Ocean, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Vancouver Island, Haida Gwaii, Pacific Salmon, Escapement, BC16, Salmon Spawning Observations
Federal

This program is used to determine juvenile salmonid population status and trends for Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Surveys occur annually during the first two weeks of August and are focused on Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). Data are derived from in-stream salmon fry sampling by use of minnow trap at select streams in the Long Beach and West Coast Trail units of the Park with historical runs of salmon. Salmonid fishes act as an ecological process vector, connecting and transporting energy and nutrients between the freshwater environments, coastal forests and marine ecosystems.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Salmon, Coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii), Stream restoration
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada's (DFO’s) Atlantic Salmon Watch Program (ASWP) was established in 1991 to study the abundance, distribution and biology of Atlantic salmon in British Columbia and its adjacent waters. The ASWP relies on voluntary reports from Indigenous, recreational and commercial fishers, processors, field biologists and hatchery workers. If you capture or observe an Atlantic salmon in BC waters, please keep the carcass and call the toll-free reporting line at 1-800-811-6010 or email aswp@dfo-mpo.gc.ca. Donation is not mandatory but it provides valuable samples for our scientific study.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, fish farming, salmon farming, British Columbia, BC, Atlantic salmon, DFO
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO’s) Pacific Aquaculture Regulations and Conditions of Licence for aquaculture in B.C. require licence holders to take various fish escape prevention measures, including maintaining cage and nets in a manner to prevent the escape of farmed fish into the ocean as well as responding to remedy the cause of the escape as soon as possible. When there is evidence that an escape event has occurred, licence holders must report the incident to the department within 24 hours either through the Observe Record and Report Line (ORR 1-800-465-4336), or to a dedicated email mailbox, detailing the cause, time and location of the event and the species, size and number of fish involved. The licence holder must also provide fish health information about the stock, such as exposure to therapeutants.

Last Updated: Jul. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 22, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, licence, fish farming, salmon farming, aquaculture escapes, British Columbia, BC
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Chinook Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Fisheries management, Fisheries policy
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Coho Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Fisheries policy, Fisheries
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Chum Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Fish, Fisheries
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Sockeye Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Fish, Fisheries management
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Sockeye Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Conservation areas, Fisheries management
Federal

A Conservation Unit (CU) is a group of wild Pacific salmon sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if extirpated, is very unlikely to recolonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe, such as a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations. Holtby and Ciruna (2007) provided a framework for aggregating the five species of salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) found on Canada’s Pacific coast into species-specific CUs based on three primary characteristics: ecotypology, life history and genetics. The first stage in the description of the Conservation Units is based solely on ecology. The ecotypologies used in this framework include a combined characterization of both freshwater and near-shore marine environments, and is termed “joint adaptive zone”.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: SHP XLSX HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Pink Salmon, Escapement, Conservation Units, Wild Salmon Policy, Pacific, British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Conservation areas, Fisheries
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