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Found 10 records similar to European green crab - Kejimkujik

Federal

Aquatic invasive species pose economic and ecological threats to Canada's coastal waters. In response, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has established monitoring programs to detect and track the spread of aquatic invasive species, including European Green Crab, in Canadian waters. Fukui traps have been deployed annually at both new and long-term monitoring locations throughout coastal British Columbia.

Last Updated: Apr. 8, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 31, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Aquatic Invasive Species; Green Crab; Monitoring, Aquatic animals, Marine biology, Invasive species
Federal

Terra Nova National Park monitors crab populations for the presence of the invasive European Green Crab; the abundance of native Rock Crab is also monitored. Park personnel uses baited traps for these surveys.

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  European Green Crab, Rock Crab, invasive species, detection, community level shift, trapping, Newman Sound, Newfoundland
Federal

Tow, catch, and biological information for crab caught during the annual snow crab research vessel trawl survey in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 6, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Crustaceans, Population Dynamics, Fisheries, Trawl, Chionoecetes opilio, Gulf of St. Lawrence
Federal

Areas of known Snow Crab presence in the Bay of Fundy and Port Hawkesbury areas. The Coastal Oceanography and Ecosystem Research section (DFO Science) reviewed science sources and local knowledge sources to estimate where Snow Crab are seasonally present and delineate these areas. As of March 2017, this dataset delineates the presence of snow crab in the Bay of Fundy and Port Hawkesbury areas of Nova Scotia designated within the Area Response Planning (ARP), identified under the World Class Tanker Safety System (WCTSS) initiative, based on the Transport Canada's Response Organizations Standards.

A version of this dataset was created for the National Environmental Emergency Center (NEEC) following their data model and is available for download in the Resources section.

Last Updated: Nov. 13, 2019
Date Published: Jun. 21, 2018
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

Brook trout are top predators in aquatic ecosystems at Kejimkujik that integrate the effects of stressors throughout the aquatic trophic structure. They are sensitive to a variety of stressors, including acidification, changes in water quality, climate change, fishing pressure, exotic species introductions, trophic structure alterations, land use change, and watershed fragmentation. The monitoring program tracks Brook trout population status, as assessed by relative abundance and trout condition at two watersheds in Kejimkujik. Volunteer anglers record morphometric and catch per unit effort data during the months of April, May and June for 3 years in a row every 5 years.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Brook trout, Stressors, Population status, Nova Scotia
Federal

The Common loon is a highly visible water bird inhabiting many of the lakes within Kejimkujik and the greater park ecosystem. It is a top predator in freshwater ecosystems in the area and is sensitive to a variety of stressors, including mercury bio-accumulation, acidification, water level fluctuation and human disturbance. The monitoring program tracks loon population status, by recording the number of adult pairs and number of chicks on focal lakes at Kejimkujik. Monitoring occurs twice annually in June and August using field observations from volunteers and park staff.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Common Loon, Stressors, Abundance and recruitment rate, Nova-Scotia
Federal

Data layers show commercial fishery footprints for directed fisheries using bottom and pelagic longlines for groundfish and large pelagics respectively, and traps for hagfish, LFA 41 and Grey Zone lobster, snow crab, and other crab on the Scotian Shelf, the Bay of Fundy, and Georges Bank in NAFO Divisions 4VWX and Canadian portions of 5Y and 5Z. Bottom longline and trap fishery maps aggregate commercial logbook effort (bottom longline soak time and logbook entries) per 2-minute grid cell using 2002–2017 data. Pelagic longline maps aggregate speed-filtered vessel monitoring system (VMS) track lines as vessel minutes per km2 on a base-10 log scale using 2003–2018 data. The following data layers are included in the mapping service for use in marine spatial planning and ecological risk assessment: 1) multi-year and quarterly composite data layers for bottom longline and trap gear, and 2) multi-year and monthly composite data layers for pelagic longline gear.

Last Updated: May 12, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2019
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB XLS ESRI REST
Keywords:  Bottom Longline, Pelagic Longline, Trap Fishery, Oceans, Fisheries, Fish, Fishing area
Provincial

The Green/White Area dataset is comprised of all the polygons that represent the Green and White areas in the province of Alberta for the Department of Alberta Environment and Parks administrative purpose.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Nov. 16, 2021
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  alberta, boundaries, canada, green area, green white area, green white zone, green zone, live data and maps, white area
Federal

Soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) are a dominant intertidal invertebrate in Kejimkujik lagoons where they perform several important ecological functions including stabilizing the mud flat for other benthic organisms, improving water quality, and providing an important food source to several native species, including migrating shorebirds. Monitoring of population structure is necessary to determine whether the clam population is maintaining itself or declining. A pilot study was conducted in 2007 in Little Port Joli Basin to assess the status of the population and determine the cost efficiency of monitoring. This work is performed every 3 years from July to October at the same locations within the productive clam flat area.

Last Updated: Apr. 10, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Coastal, soft-shell clam, population structure, lagoons, Nova Scotia
Provincial

The Historical Green/White Area dataset is comprised of all the polygons that represent the historical Green and White areas in Alberta.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 23, 2011
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  boundaries, historical green area, historical green areas, historical green white area, historical green white areas, historical green white zone, historical green white zones, historical green zone, historical green zones
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