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Found 10 records similar to Stream Hydrology - Terra Nova

Federal

Hydrological patterns determine water depth, flow intensity, duration, and frequency of flooding, as well as low flow periods. Water levels in streams are not considered stable, but fluctuate seasonally. Hydrologic conditions primarily affect abiotic factors such as habitat structure, temperature and water chemistry, which in turn determine the biotic components (species composition, species richness, primary productivity) of the stream ecosystem. In PEI National Park, stream discharge (m3/sec) is predicted in four streams within PEI National Park using Onset HOBO U20 water level loggers and rating curves generated in four small 1 – 3rd order streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, hydrology, water level, flow intensity, Richards-Baker Index (RBI), stream flow index
Federal

Hydrological inputs and outputs determine water depth, flow patterns, and duration and frequency of flooding. The seasonal pattern of changes in a wetland’s water level is called the hydroperiod. Year-to-year variability of hydroperiod is related to climate and site specific conditions. Hydrologic conditions primarily affect abiotic factors such as nutrient availability, soil chemistry, and water chemistry which all, in turn, determine the biotic components (species composition, species richness, primary productivity) of wetland ecosystems.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, hydrology, water level, flow index, flow, hydroperiod, Richards-Baker Index (RBI), wetland, water level loggers
Provincial

Stream flow data are available for a number of streams across the province. New Stream flow data is available from June through September. Those who hold a Water Withdrawal for Irrigation Purposes Permit can use this tool to confirm the water flow in Island streams, and to determine whether they may legally draw water for irrigation purposes.

Last Updated: Jun. 29, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 29, 2021
Organization: Government of Prince Edward Island
Formats: XML HTML RDF CSV other RSS
Keywords:  stream, river, creek, brook, monitoring, irrigation
Provincial

Points with rotations that indicate downstream flow direction. Can be displayed with arrow symbols to show flow direction. There is one point at the upstream end for each stream network feature

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Dec. 11, 2014
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML PDF HTML WMS
Keywords:  Britsh Columbia, CWB, FWA, corporate watershed base, freshwater atlas, stream direction, Government information
Federal

A drainage basin is the area that drains all precipitation into a river or stream system into a common outlet such as a lake or sea. There are two main river basins in Nunavut: the Thelon River flows into Hudson Bay and the Back River empties into the Arctic Ocean. Most of Nunavut’s area is not drained through large rivers; instead the water flows directly to the ocean through small rivers and streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, watersheds
Federal

Stream hydrology strongly affects habitat quality for most stream-dwelling species, and is affected by both climate and land use. This measure, which is colocated with stream temperature regime, reports on flow parameters in 10-12 park streams over time - using in-situ water level data loggers, as well as hydrometric stations.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hydrology, Stream Flow, Water Level, Environment Canada, data loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

This dataset contains annual mean stream water flow/discharge data derived from daily means for headwater streams draining forested hillslopes measured at stream catchments C31, C32, C33, C34, C35, C37, C38, C39, C42, C46, C47, C49, and C50 in the Turkey Lakes Watershed, approximately 60 km northwest of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. This data set is recorded as annual mean flow by calendar year (January-December in litres per second), annual mean flow by water year (October to September in litres per second), and annual number of zero flow days by water year. Daily mean flows that were used to derive this data set were recorded from 1981-2012 by the Great Lakes Forestry Centre, and are reported for 1981-2011 due to some inaccuracies throughout the 2012 data.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 27, 2020
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream water flow, Turkey Lakes Watershed, Long Term Study, Biological diversity, Aquatic ecosystems, Boreal ecosystems, Chemistry, Climate change, Ecology
Provincial

The placer potential mapping process consisted of applying a classification rating of 1 to 5 (lowest to highest) for all streams within the planning area. Factors affecting a stream's potential included development history and hard rock mining potential (gold deposit potential). Terrain attributes such as potential overburden thichness, water flow, or local topography were not factored into the rating due to lack of knowledges for most unmined drainages.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 10, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Provincial

This dataset is produced for the Government of Alberta and is available to the general public. Please consult the Distribution Information of this metadata for the appropriate contact to acquire this dataset. The Base Watersheds data was created by re-working and post-processing the digital elevation data from the Alberta Provincial Digital Elevation Model, the digital hydrography data from the Base Stream and Flow Representation Lines, the Base Waterbody Polygons and the Base Hydrography Point Events and the digital boundaries of the ATS Version 4.1 Alberta Provincial Boundary. The digital elevation data was hydrologically corrected using simplified versions of the Base Stream and Flow Representation Lines and the Base Waterbody Polygons.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Nov. 1, 2018
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML other
Keywords:  alberta, elevation, geoscientificinformation, hydrocoding, hydrology, inlandwaters, reaches, routes, strahler order
Federal

In eastern Canada, Harlequin ducks are uncommon and are listed by COSEWIC as a species of special concern. Resident of fast flowing-rivers and streams during the breeding season, their presence and abundance reflects the health of these ecosystems. The park censuses harlequin ducks on four rivers and streams of Gros Morne National Park; the Spring breeding survey is done in 1 day of helicopter surveys, every 5 years in May.

Last Updated: Jun. 19, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Special Concern Species, Harlequin Duck, Aerial Survey, Newfoundland
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