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Found 10 records similar to Temporal changes in human pressures and wetland response in the St. Lawrence River

Federal

The specific composition, biomass, vertical distribution and metal content of submerged and emergent aquatic plants in the St. Lawrence were evaluated. The riparian vegetation community of the St. Lawrence is characterized by the presence of extensive wetlands in the floodplain, a border of emergent plants and vast underwater meadows dominated by American wild celery (Vallisneria americana), a strong indicator species of metal concentration.

Supplemental Information

The St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP) 2011 to 2026 (see http://planstlaurent.qc.ca/en/home.html) is the latest Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence and builds on the four previous agreements implemented since 1988.

For more information on SLAP, please visit https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/environmental-funding/ecosystem-initiatives/st-lawrence-action-plan.html

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  submerged aquatic vegetation, emergent aquatic vegetation, Vallisneria americana, macrophyte, metals, indicator, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), Environment
Federal

The epiphytic cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia pisum forms spherical colonies embedded in a gelatinous matrix that is attached to submerged aquatic vegetation. In surveys of two fluvial lakes of the St. Lawrence River conducted in 2006–2007, growth conditions and diazotrophic ability in conjunction with the biomass and condition of its supporting macrophyte, Vallisneria americana, were examined. G. pisum integrates complex, temporally variable water-quality characteristics that are dependent upon hydrology and water residence time, thus acting as an early warning indicator of incipient habitat degradation that may lead to cyanobacterial proliferation and low biomass of vascular macrophytes. Supplemental Information

The St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP) 2011 to 2026 (see http://planstlaurent.qc.ca/en/home.html) is the latest Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence and builds on the four previous agreements implemented since 1988.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  St. Lawrence River, Lake Saint-Pierre, Lake Saint-Louis, epiphytic cyanobacteria, Gloeotichia pisum, Vallisneria americana, nitrogen depletion, indicator, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP)
Federal

Parasite communities were examined in Johnny Darters (Etheostoma nigrum) collected from five localities in the St. Lawrence River in southwestern Quebec: two reference localities, one polluted locality upstream of the Island of Montreal and downstream of industrial and agricultural activity, and two polluted localities downstream of the Island of Montreal in the plume from the wastewater treatment facility. Fish from the upstream polluted locality had the highest parasite species richness and total parasite numbers, and fish from the downstream polluted localities the lowest. Differences between reference and polluted localities were mainly due to higher abundances of the brain-encysting trematode, Ornithodiplostomum sp., at the reference localities. Differences between upstream and downstream polluted localities were mainly due to a higher diversity and abundance of trematodes in fish at the upstream locality

Supplemental Information

The St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP) 2011 to 2026 (see http://planstlaurent.qc.ca/en/home.html) is the latest Canada-Quebec Agreement on the St. Lawrence and builds on the four previous agreements implemented since 1988.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2019
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Johnny Darter (Etheostoma nigrum), Fish, parasite communities, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), St. Lawrence River, Parasites, Environment, Biota, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants
Federal

Increased productivity from sewage effluents can enhance species richness locally. Results from a study of Spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius) in 1999 showed that prevalence and the mean number of myxozoan parasite species per host were higher downstream of the wastewater outflow from the Island of Montreal than upstream in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. This was attributed to organic enrichment of the sediments which presumably lead to increased densities of oligochaetes, the alternate hosts, downstream of Montreal. Spottail shiners subsequently were collected every August/early September in 2001–2004 to examine the stability and repeatability of these patterns.

Last Updated: Jul. 28, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, Myxozoans, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), St. Lawrence River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Federal

In this study, seven non‐specific biomarkers were compared in Spottail Shiners (Notropis hudsonius Clinton) from localities receiving urban and industrial effluents and relatively clean localities in the St Lawrence River, Canada. Pigmented macrophages are involved in a variety of functions including the detoxification and recycling of exogenous and endogenous material, responses to foreign material or infectious agents, and antigen recognition. Pigmented macrophage aggregates are focal accumulations of pigmented macrophages found in the spleen, kidney, liver and other organs of fishes. They may respond to toxicants or exposure to infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria either by increasing in number and size or by changing the shape of the aggregation.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), pigmented macrophages, St. Lawrence River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Federal

Aquatic systems near major urban centers are constantly contaminated with effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Pharmaceuticals are part of the contamination and several classes of drugs have been detected in surface waters in the last decade. To better understand the impact of those pharmaceuticals in ecosystems, the exposure to aquatic species needs to be investigated. This study presents a new simple and rugged quantitative method for the determination of several classes of drugs using plasma from Northern Pike (Esox lucius) environmentally exposed to a major but highly diluted urban effluent.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 26, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  St. Lawrence River, Îles de Boucherville, Îlet Vert, Northern Pike (Esox lucius), Pharmaceuticals, fish, blood plasma, Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP)
Federal

The Richelieu River, Quebec, is a highly-regulated waterway subject to numerous anthropogenic influences from municipal effluents and agricultural activities. Parasite communities in 234 spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius) were examined from 4 localities in late spring 2003 and 2004. Parasite component community similarity among localities could not be directly linked to available upstream water quality measurements or anthropogenic activity and was best explained by precipitation. This study suggests that fish parasite species composition and richness in the Richelieu River are influenced by environmental parameters which in turn ultimately are driven by a combination of climatic conditions and anthropogenic activities in the watershed.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), Fish, parasite communities, precipitation, St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP), Richelieu River, Parasites, Environment, Biota
Federal

Restrictions in the utilization of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures have led to the increased usage of alternative flame retardant additives in a wide range of commercial applications. The present study examined the occurrence of established and emerging flame retardants (EFRs) in fish from a densely-populated urbanized sector of the St. Lawrence River (Montreal, Quebec, Canada). Thirty-eight PBDE congeners and sixteen EFRs were determined in fish belonging to three predatory species (yellow perch, northern pike, and muskellunge). The bioavailability of these EFRs in human-impacted aquatic ecosystems warrants further environmental assessment and toxicity testing.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  emerging flame retardants (EFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), dechloranes, contaminants, Fish, yellow perch (Perca flavescens), northern pike (Esox lucius), muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP)
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The Nutrients in the St. Lawrence River indicator reports on the status of total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations along the St. Lawrence River. It rates total nitrogen and total phosphorus status based on whether total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations exceed Quebec's total phosphorus water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life and a total nitrogen water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life specific to the St. Lawrence River. Exceeding a water quality guideline suggests a greater risk to the health of the St. Lawrence River ecosystem posed by phosphorus and/or nitrogen.Information is provided to Canadians in a number of formats including: static and interactive maps, charts and graphs, HTML and CSV data tables and downloadable reports.

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2019
Date Published: Aug. 22, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, water, water quality, St. Lawrence River, regional ecosystems, nutrients, phosphorus, nitrogen, monitoring stations
Federal

The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators CESI program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The Phosphorus and Nitrogen Levels in the St. Lawrence River indicator reports on the status of total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations along the St. Lawrence River for the 2010 to 2012 period. The indicator rates nitrogen and phosphorus status based on whether total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations exceed Quebec's total phosphorus water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life, and its total nitrogen water quality guideline for the protection of aquatic life. When phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations exceed their respective water quality guidelines, this exceedance indicates that phosphorus and nitrogen pose a greater risk to the health of the St. Lawrence River aquatic ecosystem.

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2019
Date Published: Aug. 22, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  environmental indicators, water, water quality, St. Lawrence River, regional ecosystems, nitrogen, monitoring stations, water quality guidelines
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