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Found 10 records similar to Forest Loss - Gwaii Haanas

Federal

Gwaii Haanas evaluates changes to forest breeding songbird occupancy and diversity annually. Point counts are conducted using Acoustic Recording Units (ARUs) at permanent sampling sites.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Songbird, songbird populations, point counts, acoustic recording units, ARU, British Columbia
Federal

The forest understory vegetation community is a key ecosystem component of Haida Gwaii forests. Understory plants provide food for native fauna (bears, birds etc. ), structure for nesting habitat (eg. songbirds, auklets), and medicines for Haida use (among others).

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  black-tailed deer, Odocoileus hemionus sitchensis, forest understory, vascular plants, bryophytes, forest understory condition, browsing, shrubs, herbs
Federal

Water Quality is measured annually in both streams and lakes in Gwaii Haanas. Many water quality parameters are collected and they can be grouped into three categories: (1) Physical (e.g. temperature, depth); (2) Chemical (e.g. pH, nutrients) and (3) Biological (chlorophyll a).

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  aquatic ecosystem, water quality, freshwater systems, British Columbia
Federal

From the point of view of ecological integrity and the responsibility of the park to protect and maintain a biotic community naturally associated with the ecoregion, we are primarily interested in the extent of two land cover classes, the old-growth forest, which should not decrease in the park, and the artificially cleared areas or the anthropogenic footprint, which should not increase. This program measures the extent of old-growth forest and tracks changes in the land cover class (measured in 30x30m grid cells) to the baseline year (1990). We use land cover datasets derived from remotely-sensed satellite imagery of the park to capture forest-stand replacement events, which in our case are due to construction-related clearing or natural stand-replacing events (e.g. windthrow from storms).

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Old-growth forest extent, Spatial extent, Landcover, Remote sensing, Anthropogenic footprint
Provincial

Miscellaneous events are often the result of the cumulative impact of a combination of abiotic, insect and disease agents or events. For example, Aspen decline where repeated infestations of Forest Tent Caterpillar, are combined with several seasons of prolonged drought. The Government of Ontario tracks forest damage events to help proactively manage the detrimental effects to our forests. We monitor the threat and spread of invasive forest pest insect species in Ontario.

Last Updated: Mar. 30, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2020
Organization: Government of Ontario
Formats: HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  Economy and Business, Environment and Natural Resources, Environment and energy, Government information
Federal

In partnership with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Parks Canada monitors salmon populations on 5 key indicator streams by annually measuring the “escapement” value of salmon stocks in each watershed. ‘Escapement’ is the number of adult salmon that have escaped predation and returned to streams and rivers to spawn. This measure is part of a larger, Haida Gwaii monitoring program led by DFO. Five salmon species are monitored in Gwaii Haanas: sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), coho (O. kisutch), pink (O. gorbuscha), chum (O. keta) and chinook (O. tschawytscha

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats:
Keywords:  Escapement, salmon escapement, sockeye coho, pink, chum, chinook, key indicator
Federal

Non-native mammal species are monitored annually in areas critical for the protection important seabird islands. Remote cameras are deployed for 15-days to annually detect any changes to the mammal community at key sites. Non-native species pose the greatest ecological threat in Gwaii Haanas. Deer dramatically alter the vegetation and rats, racoons and squirrels impact native species both directly (predation) and indirectly (competition).

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Non-native mammals, remote camera, predation, mammal communities, ecological threat, British Columbia
Federal

Gwaii Haanas has partnered with ECCC to monitor a set of permanent plots mapping colony structure and burrow occupancy rate by excavating samples of burrows of Ancient Murrelet and Cassin’s Auklet. The data are used to determine if the breeding population areas are changing at specific key nesting colonies and if the change signifies an increasing or decreasing population trend. An estimated 1.5 million seabirds breed colonially on the 200+ islands, islets and rocks of Haida Gwaii, including globally and nationally significant proportions of 5 seabird species. A significant threat to breeding seabirds is predation by non-native mammals, notably raccoons and rats.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ancient Murrelet, Cassin’s Auklet, plot system, burrow occupancy, breeding population, breeding seabirds, colony-nesting, British Columbia
Provincial

An abiotic damage event is a non-biological event -- such as wind or an ice storm -- that has damaged areas of forested land. Abiotic damage event information is mainly used to: * generate summary maps for these events at a general or provincial scale * monitor the extent of damage for forest fire prevention purposes * calculate gross timber volume loss estimates caused by these events Instructions for downloading this dataset: * select the link below and scroll down the metadata record page until you find Transfer Options in the Distribution Information section * select the link beside the Data for download label * you must provide your name, organization and email address in order to access the dataset This product requires the use of GIS software. *[GIS]: geographic information system

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2020
Organization: Government of Ontario
Formats: HTML other ESRI REST
Keywords:  Economy and Business, Environment and Natural Resources, Environment and energy, Government information
Federal

Annual decay rates in soil humus are monitored in 12 permanent forest plots within PEI National Park using year-to-year dry weight losses of standardized wood pieces (tongue depressors) as a proxy for soil decomposition. Climate change, pollution, dominant vegetation and land-use can all have profound influences on forest soil decomposition.

Last Updated: Oct. 8, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, soil, forest, decomposition rate
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