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Found 10 records similar to Sensitive Species Secure Habitat - Waterton Lakes - Forest

Provincial

This dataset contains four layers: Grizzly Bear Core Access Management Area, Grizzly Bear Secondary Access Management Area, Grizzly Bear Habitat Linkage, and Grizzly Bear Support Zone. The Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan Management Zones dataset provides a spatial representation of the proposed Recovery, Support, and Habitat Linkage Zones as described in Chapter 4 of the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan(see references for link). Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) zone delineations are based upon agreed upon grizzly bear core and secondary grizzly bear watershed units determined by Alberta Environment and Parks, and the Boreal Grizzly bear range of the Chinchaga area. Grizzly bear watershed units are characterised as being either Core or Secondary grizzly bear habitat.

Last Updated: Sep. 28, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 15, 2022
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML other
Keywords:  -CANADA, ACCESS-MANAGEMENT, ALBERTA, BIOTA, ENVIRONMENT, GRIZZLY-BEAR, HABITAT, PLANNINGCADASTRE, RECOVERY-PLAN
Provincial

Grizzly bear habitat to be incorporated into the Central Coast Land and Coastal Resource Management Plan

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 12, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  BC, Canada, Cariboo, Central Coast Forest District, Mid Coast Forest District, Williams Lake, class 1 habitat, class 2 habitat, grizzly bear
Federal

This dataset contains species counts that have been collected using an array of 30 remote wildlife cameras. The purpose of the study is to monitor grizzly populations. The wildlife cameras are therefore placed strategically in Grizzly habitat within and adjacent to the Firth River Corridor in Ivvavik National Park. The wildlife cameras capture a photo when an animal enters its’ zone of detection and saves the photo along with time and day.

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Grizzly Bear Occupancy, Grizzly, carnivores, Ivvavik National Park, keystone species, wildlife cameras, Firth River, terrestrial
Provincial

Boundaries identifying similar behavioural ecotypes and sub-populations of Grizzly bears. This dataset contains versions from multiple years. From 2018 on, NatureServe conservation concern ranking categories (e.g., Very Low, Low, Moderate, High, Extreme Concern) supersede the pre-2018 population status categories (e.g., Viable, Threatened, Extirpated) contained in the field STATUS. NatureServe conservation concern ranking categories reflect population size and trend, genetic and demographic isolation, as well as threats to bears and their habitats.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 21, 2013
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML PDF HTML WMS
Keywords:  GBPU, Grizzly Bear, Grizzly Bear Population Unit, Population, bear, grizzly, unit, Government information
Federal

Sensitivity analyses indicate that a small drop in black bear survival rates greatly increases the risk of extinction in both females and males. Since the mortality rate of bears in the park is directly affected by harvesting intensity and habitat alteration, La Mauricie National Park aims to limit human activities to ensure that a viable black bear population is maintained. The relative abundance of the black bear is assessed in the spring using a network of 30 sampling stations equipped with surveillance cameras or trail cameras..

Last Updated: Sep. 17, 2019
Date Published: Sep. 17, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Carnivores, Black Bear, Population Cycle, Trail Camera, Surveillance Camera, Station, Cameras, Mauricie
Federal

Motion-detection cameras are a cost-effective and non-invasive tool used in Waterton Lakes National Park for sampling mammal populations and estimating species occurrence. Occupancy modelling, which uses detection/non-detection data from cameras, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses. Data are collected throughout the year across Waterton Lakes National Park to determine change in the distribution of key animal populations as well as supporting demographic predictions to better inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  multi-species mammal occupancy, native species, cougar, lynx, grizzly bears, red fox, wolf, wolves, wolverine
Provincial

Capability mapping showing provincially significant winter ranges from CORE for moose, bighorn sheep, mule deer, goat, black bear, grizzly bear and caribou. Disclaimer: This is older strategic scale mapping information that may be superseded in some areas with more detailed TEM mapping information

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 12, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  BC, Canada, Cariboo, GOAT, Williams Lake, bighorn sheep, black bear, cabatility, cariboo
Provincial

Outline of Moose Habitat area (important grizzly area too)

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 12, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  BC, Canada, Cariboo, Williams Lake, Williams Lake SRMP, grizzly bear, moose habitat, Government information
Federal

Birds are the most diverse of land vertebrates and are an important indicator of ecosystem health. Large protected areas, such as Waterton Lakes National Park, provide important habitat for a wide range of bird species. Data collected can provide a number of ecological indices; for example, used to assess the effects of land use and climate change. Yearly data are collected at these sites using audio recorders to determine indices of bird diversity and occupancy trends to inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest birds, acoustic monitoring, portable recorders, bird guilds, Montane Cordillera, Alberta
Federal

Non-native plants have invaded most low-elevation habitats and physically disturbed sites in Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP). Parks Canada devotes substantial resources annually to efforts to control or eradicate the most invasive and persistent non-native plants. A Non-native Plant Condition Monitoring protocol was developed to detect changes in the abundance and distribution of non-native plant species across vulnerable regions of WLNP, and to gain an understanding of the severities and differences in impacts that non-native plants have on native plant communities. Relative abundance (I.e.

Last Updated: Apr. 16, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  invasive non-native plants, percent cover, relative abundance, random sampling, power analysis, Alberta
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