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Found 10 records similar to Research at a Glance: National Justice Survey 2017 - Sentencing Commissions and Guidelines

Federal

The majority of Canadians believe that judges should have at least some degree of discretion and flexibility when deciding a sentence. What we also found:

The overwhelming majority of Canadians (95%) felt that the best approach for determining fair and appropriate sentences for offenders involves giving judges at least some degree of discretion. Seven in ten (71%) Canadians thought the best way was to give judges some sort of guideline or range of sentences to choose from, with the option of going outside those ranges if they deem it necessary. About one-quarter (24%) of Canadians believed that the best way to determine a fair and appropriate sentence was to give judges full discretion (deciding on the sentence after looking at how the offence happened, why the offender did it and what sentences were given in other similar cases).

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 4, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system
Federal

Readers Note: This publication presents results of an online public opinion survey completed by a sample of Canadians who received an invitation through email, Facebook and Twitter (called an "open link" sample; see Method for more details). This survey mirrored a survey conducted with a representative sample of Canadians, the results of which are available at Research on Justice Issues

Most respondents believe that diversion of accused people from the courts, should be the preferred response in some types of offences/situations. They also believe that increased use of diversion could make the criminal justice system (CJS) more efficient and effective. The majority of respondents believe that judges should have at least some degree of discretion and flexibility when deciding a sentence.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 2, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system, Convictions
Federal

Youth want a criminal justice system (CJS) that shows empathy and takes into consideration the circumstances of individuals before and during sentencing. Youth feel that the CJS should use more alternatives to incarceration that are community-based, restorative and place a focus on rehabilitation.

We also found:

Youth believed the two most important factors in terms of sentencing are the offender’s circumstances/history, and the nature of the crime, including the context, severity and motive of the crime.
A majority of youth highlighted the need for the CJS to recognize the circumstances of vulnerable Canadians, individuals who are racialized, impoverished or those suffering from mental health challenges when making sentencing decisions.

Last Updated: Nov. 21, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Mental health, Youth engagement, Court decisions
Federal

Reader's Note: This publication presents results of an online public opinion survey completed by a sample of Canadians who received an invitation through email, Facebook and Twitter (called "open link" sample; see method for more details). This survey mirrored a survey conducted with a representative sample of Canadians, the results of which are available at Research on Justice issues.

In general, respondents were not supportive of the current MMP regime and preferred a more individualized approach to sentencing. Compared to the representative sample of Canadians, respondents to the open link survey were more knowledgeable of MMPs, more supportive of full discretion for judges in sentencing, and less supportive of MMPs.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 1, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Annual reports, Criminal justice
Federal

Canadians are generally supportive of community-based sentencing; many feel that these sentences could have a number of positive impacts from reducing crime and increasing safety to greater efficiency in the criminal justice system.

What we also found:

After reviewing statistics on incarceration rates and who is incarcerated in Canada, over half of Canadians (55%) agreed that too many people were incarcerated (17% disagreed and 18% neither agreed nor disagreed)

Support for community-based sentences was much stronger for non-violent crimes.

Last Updated: Nov. 21, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Annual reports
Federal

In general, Canadians are not supportive of the current mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) regime and prefer a more individualized approach to sentencing.

We also found:

Most Canadians indicated that they have a low to moderate level of knowledge of MMPs (52% low and 28% moderate).

Over three quarters (77%) of Canadians believed that in general, applying the same minimum sentence to all offenders who are convicted of the same offence is now fair and appropriate. Only 16% of Canadians believed MMPs lead to fair sentences.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 2, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system, Convictions
Federal

What we found:

Young people noted that the most important factors judges should consider in fair and equitable sentencing are personal circumstances and history of the accused person, and the nature of the crime, including the context, severity and motive for the crime. Ultimately, young people did not believe that mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) were beneficial because they limit judicial discretion.

Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Court decisions, Research, Justice system, judges, Criminal justice, Youth
Federal

Youth custody and community services, admissions to sentence custody by sex and sentence length ordered, five years of data.

Last Updated: Apr. 20, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 20, 2022
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  children and youth, correctional services, crime and justice, table, youth correctional services, youth crime and justice
Federal

This Revised User’s Guide (which we sometimes call the “RUG”) updates and replaces the two previous versions: the original User’s Guide released in July 2008 with the Final Version of the Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines (SSAG); and the New and Improved User’s Guide which we produced in March 2010. The previous versions of the User’s Guide have frequently been cited by the courts in their decisions, and by lawyers in their arguments about the Advisory Guidelines. This version provides us with an opportunity to update the past five years of SSAG case law, as well as to address some practical issues which have emerged since 2010. The SSAG have now been in use for more than ten years, starting with the Draft Proposal in January 2005 and then the Final Version of 2008.

Last Updated: Aug. 6, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 6, 2016
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Family Law, Spousal Support, Guide, Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines
Federal

Adult correctional services, sentenced custody admissions to provincial and territorial programs by sex and sentence length ordered, five years of data.

Last Updated: Apr. 20, 2022
Date Published: Apr. 20, 2022
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  adult correctional services, correctional services, crime and justice, table
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