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Found 10 records similar to Drinking is up to you (poster)

Federal

Drinking tonight? (poster). Tips for a good night.

Last Updated: Nov. 5, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 3, 2021
Organization: Public Health Agency of Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Tips, for a, good, night, Weed, alcohol, Prescription, medications, For
Federal

Hey, are you ok? Poster to help identify alcohol overdoses. Too many alcohol overdoses aren't addressed because the difference between being really drunk and an overdose can sometimes be hard to identify.

Last Updated: Nov. 5, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 3, 2021
Organization: Public Health Agency of Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Hey, are, you, ok, poster, Alcohol, poisoning, protected, Good
Federal

The Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality are established by Health Canada in collaboration with the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Committee on Drinking Water (CDW) and other federal government departments.

Last Updated: Oct. 7, 2020
Date Published: May 14, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Water, water quality, drinking water, potable water, guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality.
Federal

Health Canada has developed a guideline value for chloramines in drinking water to protect the health of Canadians. Learn about what it means to have chloramines in your drinking water.

Last Updated: Oct. 7, 2020
Date Published: Feb. 7, 2020
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Water Talk, drinking water, Chloramines.
Federal

It is not considered necessary to establish a maximum acceptable concentration for chloramines in drinking water, based on the low toxicity of monochloramine at concentrations found in drinking water. Any measures taken to limit the concentration of chloramines or their by-products in drinking water supplies must not compromise the effectiveness of disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chloramines, chloramines in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

It is not considered necessary to establish a guideline for chlorine in drinking water, based on its low toxicity at concentrations found in drinking water as a result of treatment. Any measures taken to limit the concentration of chlorine or its by-products in drinking water supplies must not compromise the effectiveness of disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chlorine, chlorine in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chlorite in drinking water is 1 mg/L. The MAC for chlorate in drinking water is 1 mg/L. A guideline for chlorine dioxide is not required because of its rapid reduction to chlorite in drinking water. Utilities should make every effort to meet the guidelines, however, any method of control employed must not compromise the effectiveness of water disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chlorite, chlorite in drinking-water, chlorate, chlorate in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The production of ammonia is a normal part of metabolism, and levels occurring in the human body from metabolic processes generally exceed concentrations found in drinking water. The concentration of free ammonia entering the distribution system can lead to nitrification and the potential increase of nitrate and nitrite in drinking water. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with ammonia in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, ammonia, ammonia in drinking-water, health risks
Federal

Bromate is usually found in drinking water as a result of water treatment, rather than through source water contamination. The presence of bromate in treated drinking water is primarily related to the reaction between ozone and naturally occurring bromide in source water and to its formation during the generation of hypochlorite solutions used to disinfect water. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with bromate in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 3, 2018
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, bromate, bromate in drinking-water, health risks
Federal

Safe drinking water is everybody's business. Managing drinking water supplies properly, from the source water to the consumer's tap, takes a great deal of knowledge and coordination among multiple stakeholders--from governments and businesses, to individuals like you and me.

Last Updated: Oct. 7, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 12, 2019
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Water, water quality, drinking water, potable water
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